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45° jig / sled for perfect miters

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Project by Grumpymike posted 07-30-2019 07:13 PM 1071 views 3 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I needed a jig to cut dead on 45° miters for keepsake boxes.
using the blade set to45° will create a bit of a bow in the miter. Keeping the blade at 90° keeps the gyro effect and the force of inertia true.

Some years ago I saw something similar, and the concept stuck in my pointy head. Now that I needed to improve on my miters I decided to try a jig, but how to get the work surface perfect … Well as I was using the speed square for something else … and the idea grew into this.

The clamping system sucks, just to clumsy, so there is room for some fine tuning. But the bottom line is that it works very well.

Be safe and be well

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.





18 comments so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1101 days


#1 posted 07-30-2019 08:31 PM

I use an identical jig for my box miters. Much easier than setting the saw and then having to return it to square.

View jeff's profile

jeff

1155 posts in 3976 days


#2 posted 07-30-2019 09:05 PM

Nice jig.

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1892 posts in 2006 days


#3 posted 07-30-2019 09:29 PM

Need to make a jig like this one for my shop.
Cheers!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View therealSteveN's profile (online now)

therealSteveN

3902 posts in 1086 days


#4 posted 07-30-2019 09:59 PM

If the wood to be mitered isn’t very wide, placing a strip upright at the back edge keeps the wood you are sawing from wanting to move as the blade hits it. Either that or solidly clamp the stock being cut to the jig. Not doing either can be a bit unsafe and have some wood flying around. Unfortunately I took care of a guy once missing 2 fangers. His wood moved on one of those, and he tried to grab it. Said he knew that was stupid, but he thought he could stop it.

I’m a blade tilter for bevel cuts, and use a M&T jig 90 to the tables top, and I clamp the work, and have a stock support behind the stock. That way I can do 45, 30, 33, 22.5. Those Wixey’s are unstoppable. :-) The M&T jig allows me to fine tune that exact spot where the blade hits so all the different angles are fresh. I don’t remember ever actually making a M&T part on that jig, but for bevels it just works.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

23387 posts in 3617 days


#5 posted 07-30-2019 11:40 PM

Necessity is the mother of invention. Nice going, Mike!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View mel52's profile (online now)

mel52

1032 posts in 776 days


#6 posted 07-31-2019 01:53 AM

Looks like you just showed me another jig I need. Great work !!! Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View JTTHECLOCKMAN's profile

JTTHECLOCKMAN

245 posts in 3661 days


#7 posted 07-31-2019 03:09 AM



If the wood to be mitered isn t very wide, placing a strip upright at the back edge keeps the wood you are sawing from wanting to move as the blade hits it. Either that or solidly clamp the stock being cut to the jig. Not doing either can be a bit unsafe and have some wood flying around. Unfortunately I took care of a guy once missing 2 fangers. His wood moved on one of those, and he tried to grab it. Said he knew that was stupid, but he thought he could stop it.

I m a blade tilter for bevel cuts, and use a M&T jig 90 to the tables top, and I clamp the work, and have a stock support behind the stock. That way I can do 45, 30, 33, 22.5. Those Wixey s are unstoppable. :-) The M&T jig allows me to fine tune that exact spot where the blade hits so all the different angles are fresh. I don t remember ever actually making a M&T part on that jig, but for bevels it just works.

- therealSteveN


Yea I am with this thought too. Unless you can clamp the piece being cut too much can go wrong. That is why I do not like the Micro Mark little hobby saw. The blade does not tilt and you have to use a device just like this.

-- John T.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1101 days


#8 posted 07-31-2019 03:57 AM


Not doing either can be a bit unsafe and have some wood flying around. Unfortunately I took care of a guy once missing 2 fangers.

- therealSteveN

Yea I am with this thought too. Unless you can clamp the piece being cut too much can go wrong.

- JTTHECLOCKMAN

I’ve cut literally thousands of miters on my sled that matches the OP’s. Clamps just get in the way. [additional comment removed by admin]

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

1176 posts in 2461 days


#9 posted 07-31-2019 09:48 AM

That is a different way to go about it. Thanks for posting

-- Petey

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

3273 posts in 2134 days


#10 posted 07-31-2019 11:04 AM

I admire anybody that can manufacture their own jigs and have them correct – unfortunately, I’m not one of those guys. The only jig I’ve successfully made is a circle jig for the band saw. Everything else gets the wixey or Incra miter gauge
Bottom line, good job and if it works for you, GREAT !

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

2425 posts in 2827 days


#11 posted 07-31-2019 04:53 PM

Thank you all for your comments.

Steve The photos Were posted so that you could see the construction steps, then the finished product; You only looked at the first one as your comments suggest. Look at photos 3 and 6 and you will see the registration bar and the clamps in use.

Rich Please look at all of the photos then re think your comment … Thanks

I should have and will in the future, use the finished product for the first photo … then show how it was constructed. y’all have my apology for confusing you.

Another note is that the mitered pieces shown in the photos are 1/2” particle board, I used this material to show that even this ragged material can achieve a tight, straight, and good looking miter.

Again thanks to everyone for their comments.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1101 days


#12 posted 07-31-2019 05:16 PM

Rich Please look at all of the photos then re think your comment … Thanks

- Grumpymike

Nothing to re-think. One thing I do differently is that I only raise my blade enough to make the cut. Much safer without so much of it protruding. If I set my blade as high as you do, I’d definitely use a clamp.

I also glued 220 grit sandpaper to the face of mine to provide added grip. Again, without it, I’d have to use a clamp, even though I wouldn’t trust it to hold the wood steady without the sandpaper.

My boxes are all made from mesquite. I want the grain wrapped, so if one piece gets a bad cut, I have to toss the entire board. Mesquite is too expensive to let that happen.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1488 posts in 2148 days


#13 posted 08-01-2019 09:57 PM

Can you take a picture of the back side of the jig. I would really like to see what’s going on back there.
I think I might build one of these myself.
Thanks for sharing.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View therealSteveN's profile (online now)

therealSteveN

3902 posts in 1086 days


#14 posted 08-01-2019 10:57 PM

GrumpyMike

I did not see the stop block clearly in place, that was why I typed that. Computer glitch maybe, but I thought I had clicked through all the pics. Sorry, you covered it.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

2425 posts in 2827 days


#15 posted 08-01-2019 11:40 PM

Thanks for the follow up Steve,

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

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