LumberJocks

Deck has kept me out of the shop

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Project by BlueRidgeDog posted 06-29-2019 12:13 PM 667 views 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I took two months of my nights and weekends to finish a project I started a year ago. Some “fool” designed it to be 32’ long and 12’ wide…he is due a butt kicking.

It was June of last year that I dug the footers for this deck.

Then the rain came to Virginia and we did not have ten dry days in a row for nearly a year. I was also stuck on the ledger attachment, as code requires some new twists and they were explicit about not touching the brick. I though a long while on how to meet the inspector’s needs and in the end removed the brick where the attachment would be.

Cutting the brick had me stumped for a while, but I ended up using an air chisel.

Once the holes were in place, I could install the through bolt and use treated lumber and tar to seal it up.

Framing was uneventful, but one man jobs are a pain, especially when you have been around the sun many times!

Code now requires these anchors between the posts and the framing and the deck joists and the inside floor joists.

At $10 each, needing 30, it was a fun addition.

The railing is 4” hog wire. A concept I have had in my head for a long time.

All in all though I don’t object to the code improvements for decking. The end product is better and certainly safer. Though I have been out of the trades for decades, I got good marks on my inspections and was only dinged for the lack of washers on carriage bolts.

So, back to making wood chips out of untreated wood.





12 comments so far

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile

woodshaver Tony C

6831 posts in 3864 days


#1 posted 06-29-2019 01:01 PM

The photos and story show that you put your best foot forward getting this job done. It’s so important to do this job right to keep everyone safe is key. Your deck looks fantastic! Great work! I like the hog wire is it galvanized or rust proof somehow?

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

1354 posts in 2145 days


#2 posted 06-29-2019 02:12 PM

those lateral ties look like they are surface mounted with nails or screws.
Here they require that they be built into the support, not surface mounted.
If the deck starts going sideways, the wood will prevent it, not bend the nails or screws away.

-- Jeff NJ

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 290 days


#3 posted 06-29-2019 04:04 PM

All laterals are installed with approved Simpson Strong Tie fasteners (they supply them with the brace).

The hog wire is galvanized and should last my my life.

Have to stain it but will wait till spring.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3015 posts in 3949 days


#4 posted 06-29-2019 07:22 PM

My last deck was 24’x16’. I built it in two weeks alone. The temperature was in the 90’s and very humid. I rented a driller for the 12 holes. I was 62 yrs old then. Three years later and I don’t think I’d like to do it again.
The stair cases are on both sides. Like yours, being up in the air didn’t help. I like decks at waist level! Man what a difficult job.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 290 days


#5 posted 06-29-2019 07:55 PM

I think this is my last. Can’t imaging another. Waist level would be nice. Every little thing is two ladder trips…every darn little thing! No stairs yet….have to get my fence in first as it is currently a safe zone for the pup. When the fence is in I will add some steps so I can let him out from the upstairs.

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

1354 posts in 2145 days


#6 posted 06-29-2019 08:07 PM

he’s a beauty, is he a German Shepard?
You going to put corrugated under the deck, to be able to use it during the rain, and for storage?

Damn code is always changing. what’s in today, is out tomorrow. You ever notice how the old homes are, they are dry and stay up. The new homes, rot away quickly.

Wish code would just be safety related, and the rest can take care of itself.

-- Jeff NJ

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

2240 posts in 3665 days


#7 posted 07-02-2019 06:40 PM

An inspector allowed this hog wire railing?
Can’t have any sort of railing that can be climbed vertically.
One little foot in one square, one in the other. Raise one up a rung, raise the other up a rung…...eventually up and over you can go. Heck, not only a small child, your dog may be smart enough to figure out how to climb this.

-- "Fine Woodworking" is the name given to a project that takes 3 times longer than normal to finish because you used hand tools instead of power tools. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3015 posts in 3949 days


#8 posted 07-02-2019 09:08 PM



An inspector allowed this hog wire railing?
Can t have any sort of railing that can be climbed vertically.
One little foot in one square, one in the other. Raise one up a rung, raise the other up a rung…...eventually up and over you can go. Heck, not only a small child, your dog may be smart enough to figure out how to climb this.

- ohwoodeye

Yup, here in Maine, and I think most other places, railing 34”-36” and vertical balusters no more than 4 3/8” apart (the decided with of a baby’s head). Also, no more than 4 3/8” distance between deck and bottom rail.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 290 days


#9 posted 07-03-2019 01:39 PM

So in your states cable railing and similar is not to code?

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3015 posts in 3949 days


#10 posted 07-03-2019 01:55 PM



So in your states cable railing and similar is not to code?

- BlueRidgeDog

Not horizontal cable railing. Nothing a kid can climb like a ladder. Vertical spaced correctly is okay. If you’ve never seen it it’s two channels that go inside of the upper and lower rails, then you insert this cable section in holes top to bottom and turn a knurled nut on them much like tightening a bicycle wheel spoke. They look pretty nice and are fairly easy to assemble.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

499 posts in 290 days


#11 posted 07-09-2019 03:42 PM

Odd. These type of railings are permitted under residential and commercial building code. Certain localities must have additional code. Here in Virginia each locality follows IRC or the commercial and may add additional layers on that, but in rural areas you get straight IRC or IBC (previously BOCA 1 and 2).

View mtalley's profile

mtalley

111 posts in 1987 days


#12 posted 07-11-2019 06:35 AM

OK, I posted the make Video to YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mgKI_rzHh4&t=13s

I drew up a quick to-scale drawing of my version of the bracket an posted it as well:
http://mattofmanytrades.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Track-Saw-Bracket_Matt-Talley_2019.pdf

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