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Vertical Holding Jig for Tablesaw

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Project by Jim Jakosh posted 06-18-2019 03:28 AM 904 views 2 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a jig I made tonight to be able to safely and accurately slot the ends of some long vertical pieces. I had no other way to hold them safely.
This could be a tenon jig too. I was given a big cast iron tenon jig but it did not fit my tablesaw so I gave it back. This was made along those lines only I used maple plywood for the bulk to clamp to.

It is made from 1/2” and 5/8” maple plywood and doweled and screwed and glued together. It is 4” wide x 8” long and 6” high with a vertical rail to insure the piece is held square. I left a 1/4” lip on the bottom for the piece to sit on so the edge is never dragged across the top of the saw. It rides totally on the jig like a sled!

The only finish on it is wax on the bottom and side.
It worked good to put the 1/4” slots in the pieces of the next project. It held the parts real well and I felt comfortable using it that way.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!





18 comments so far

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

14666 posts in 3288 days


#1 posted 06-18-2019 03:47 AM

I’m always in the mood for new fresh jig ideas… Very smar thinking on this one

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

8460 posts in 2464 days


#2 posted 06-18-2019 04:05 AM

I have a tenon jig but this will do the job and you can not beat the cost. Good one Jim.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1190 posts in 326 days


#3 posted 06-18-2019 05:35 AM

I may need to copy this. When building my last flag display case I needed to cut 22.5 degrees on the ends, so i screwed a tall auxiliary fence (piece of plywood) onto my fence and made a square ā€œJā€ shaped piece of wood that I hung off the aux fence. Worked so-so but had to babysit each second of each cut.

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

931 posts in 1002 days


#4 posted 06-18-2019 10:30 AM

Yes I can see this jig coming soon, You did a nice job on this.

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

802 posts in 2370 days


#5 posted 06-18-2019 11:21 AM

Nice jig! I agree with SMP on the use. I use my tenon jig for the 22.5 cuts on a flag box. That jig would be a great use for that.

-- Petey

View lew's profile

lew

12807 posts in 4176 days


#6 posted 06-18-2019 01:53 PM

Sweet little jig, Jim!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3106 posts in 995 days


#7 posted 06-18-2019 06:03 PM

Nice Jim

I’m with you, those stand em up, and run the skinny end through the blade make my knees a tad weak. I have a fence mounted jig to do that, and somewhere buried under a LOT, is an old fashioned metal tenon jig. Any configuration will work, you just have to be 90* to the saw table, and running parallel to the blade.

Even doing just one tall cut, just holding up to a short fence, is putting your piano playing career in jeopardy. That thing kicks out, and there you are. Obviously can’t use an over guard, so it’s just bare spinny blade.

This is definitely one of those “lots of ways to skin this cat” deals. But please folks, use something, not to invites disaster. There is your use of a square box, to run along the fence. If you mounted a strip right at the back side to keep it from going over, you could get by with less clamp, but if that works, it’s certainly safe.

Glen Huey has a different deal, but his piece to be cut is pushed back into the corner, so clamp is optional.

I am currently using one like this that straddles the fence. I have a strip at the back like Glens back wall, so all that is needed is to pinch it with your guiding fingers at the top of the jig. You could add a clamp like the one shown though.

You can make it like a sled, so it runs in the miter gauge, like a metal tenon jig.

Sorry for the safety sermon, but without the fence to help support the work, it can go sideways quickly. But being able to make that cut opens an entire world of joints you can easily master, any of which will improve your woodworking, as the laps, and tenons are all strong joints with great face grain glue surface.

-- Think safe, be safe

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6270 posts in 2686 days


#8 posted 06-18-2019 07:38 PM

That’s a real interesting jig there, Jim. I did the J shape thing for my Biesmeyer fence to build flag cases. I had tear out issues and came up with the idea of using double sided tape to hold thin strips against the backer. It works like a champ and easily replaced.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22890 posts in 3526 days


#9 posted 06-18-2019 07:55 PM

Thank you all for the nice comments…..... glad you liked it!

Hi SMP, I had a lot of different ideas on this one but they all had a degree of” iffy” to them and I did not feel comfortable trying an end cut with the blade up 2”.

Hi Steve. I like all of those solutions- especially that second one that goes over the fence. The one thing I added to this one is that the part never touches the top of the table saw..it rests on the bottom of the jig and slides along like a part on a sled. If I had the part down to the table and it caught the edge of the insert or a wood chip, It might kick it out of line and with the blade up 2” I would not want that to happen. The cast iron one I was given ran in the miter slot, but my saw does not have any slots.

Hi Bob, thin scrap pieces behind the part is always a good idea to prevent tear-out.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6225 posts in 1133 days


#10 posted 06-18-2019 08:15 PM

GREAT JOB :<)))) GRATZ TOP 3

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3106 posts in 995 days


#11 posted 06-18-2019 08:45 PM



The one thing I added to this one is that the part never touches the top of the table saw..it rests on the bottom of the jig and slides along like a part on a sled. If I had the part down to the table and it caught the edge of the insert or a wood chip, It might kick it out of line and with the blade up 2” I would not want that to happen.

Cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

I can see that looking at it may seem like this could happen, but the biggest differences between the others I posted, and even an old metal jig is they all have the vertical support behind the stock, so they will push it along just like any stock pushes on a TS surface.

I do ascribe to having the vertical support off the TS table, so only your stock is pushed. Mine is actually about 1 inch off, this eliminates drag, you don’t need to do anything to stop potential sawdust build-up, and support wise the real work is done at the mid to upper portion of the support.

The difficulty I see is taking a cut that, either a lap type, or a tenon type cut, blade height needs to be just so. On yours you need to remember to have the distance off the table always in your calculation, so 2 heights if you will.

Plus because of the blade direction, and your movement the board can more easily be pushed backward away from your vertical support, unless you clamp really firmly. With the support behind your stock, just simple finger pressure on the stock, pressing toward the jig is all you need. I dispense with a clamp altogether, unless the stock is wider than 4”. Wide stock = more drag, more chance of movement. plus wide stock will chatter against the jig as you push it through much of the time. I would think that would cause inaccuracy. So I do clamp wider stock, usually I use one of these, they have adequate reach, and can be made strong, quickly.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

25465 posts in 4272 days


#12 posted 06-19-2019 12:31 AM

Good one Jim. Interesting you put the vertical stop piece at the front instead of behind the workpiece.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22890 posts in 3526 days


#13 posted 06-19-2019 02:05 AM

Thanks Tony and Tony!

Hi Steve and Tony. The stop is at the back of the part as I feed it through because the blade is cutting toward me as I feed it in. On that first photo, the part has passed the blade already. This is the same position as the three jigs you have shown.
Standing that high, I would never feed it through without a clamp to hold it. I have to concentrate on keeping the jig against the fence and I want to insure the part is tight to the jig all the while.

Cheers, Jim.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View mafe's profile

mafe

12075 posts in 3510 days


#14 posted 06-19-2019 02:19 PM

Hi Jim,
Less is plenty!
Lovely simple idea.
(I just cut some tall pieces yester day and dit it the stupid way…. even I have a tenon jig).
You always come up with cool ideas and simple solutions.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22890 posts in 3526 days


#15 posted 06-19-2019 07:35 PM

Thanks mads. This was out of necessity…my other option was to bandsaw and file the cuts!
You have some pretty spectacular ideas yourself!!
Cheers, my friend….........Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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