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My Tilt-Top Tool Stand

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Project by John Veazey posted 06-03-2019 02:54 AM 756 views 8 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The stand is made from construction lumber. The sides are made from two 2×4 legs connected by 2×6 stretchers. The stretchers are attached with two 1/2×2 1/2 -in. dowels and glue at each joint. The front and back stretchers connect the sides together at the bottom. Two 1/4×4-in. hex bolts terminating into two cross dowels inserted into 15/16-in. holes in the stretchers make a secure connection for the stretchers at each corner. The eight cross dowels are made from 1 1/2-in. lengths of 3/4-in electrician’s EMT. A 5/16 hole is drilled into one side of each and a 1/4-20 nut is used to secure the hex bolt to the cross dowel. The bottom panel is cut from a piece of 1/2-in. plywood and set in a 3/8-in. deep dado.

The table top is constructed from two pieces of 3/4-in. plywood with two pieces of 1/2-in. MDF between. The MDF pieces are separated at the center by 5/8-in. to construct a channel for a 5/8-11 threaded rod. The channel is parallel to the longer sides. A 5/8-in wide x 1/16-in. dado was cut in the plywood so the channel after assembly would be 5/8-in. square. I used MDF because it was in my scrap bin. 1/2-in. plywood would also work but the dado would need to be a little deeper. I used spray-on contact adhesive to stick the pieces together. To aid in alignment of the parts after the adhesive had been applied, I drilled a few 3/8-in. perpendicular holes through the parts and inserted 3/8-in. dowels. I considered assembly with the contact adhesive to be faster than using glue, weights and clamps.

The corner hardware is made from 1/4 by 4-in. eye bolts. Carriage bolts 1/4×2 1/2-in. with lock nuts secure the eyebolts in 9/32-in. slots center of the top. 1/2 OD x 1/4 ID x 1/4-in. thick bushings fill up the space between the loop of the eyebolt and the 1/4-in. carriage bolts. The slots in the top were cut on my table saw using a jig that I made to cut the corner spline slots for picture frames. A 1/4-in. Forstner bit was used to “gouge out” room for the eye end of the bolts.

The 9/32-in. slots in the top of the legs to receive the corner hardware were cut on the table saw using a dado blade. A 1/2×2 1/2-in. dowel pin was glued in a 1/2-in. hole between the slots and the top of each leg to prevent breakage.

The 5/8-in. threaded rod is held in position by a flat washer, a lock washer and a 5/8-11 nut on both sides. Another flat washer acts as shim between the nut and the bearing block. The bearing block is made from glued-up pieces of Baltic birch plywood. I found two brass 1/2-in. NPT nipples in the plumbing department of the home center that would almost fit over the 5/8-in. threaded rod. After cutting the rod to length, a flat file was used to remove a few thousands of the thread so that the bearings would fit over the rod. The bearings were inserted into 3/4-in. holes in the bearing blocks and the blocks were mounted to the top stretchers using 1/4-in. lag bolts.

The heavy steel brackets to support the casters are made by splitting with a metal-cutting bandsaw two brackets obtained from the deck and patio builder’s section of a home store. The brackets attach to the legs with ¼-in. carriage bolts. The castors attach to the brackets with two 5/16 hex head bolts and to the end grain of the legs with two hex head 5/16 lag screws.

The table was sized to be just large enough for the planner. But if I were building it again, I would make the legs a little shorter because for me at 5’-8”, the sander work surface seems a little high (47 ½-in.). I clamped on a stick to simulate a new position for the lower stretchers if the legs were shortened. My little test showed that I could reduce the distance between the top and the lower stretchers by up to 3 ½-in.

Dimensions:
Table top 27 ½ x 25 x 2-in.
Base: 30 ½ x 25×31-in. high (without casters)
Bearing blocks: 5×2 x 1/1/2-in. wide
Top of leg to upper stretcher: 2 ½-in.
Bottom of leg to bottom of lower stretcher: 2 ½-in.

Metal Parts Used (except as noted, all parts should be available in hardware store or home center):
1 ea. 5/8-11×36-in. threaded steel rod, 2 nuts, 2 lock washers, 4 flat washers
4 ea. 1/4×4-in. eye bolt with 1/2-in opening in eye
4 ea. 1 1/2-in. plastic knobs with 1/4-20 threaded insert, 4 flat washers to put under knobs
4 ea. 1/4×2 1/2-in. carriage bolts with lock nuts and flat washers
4 ea. 1/2 OD x 1/4 ID x 1/4-in. steel spacer (Mcmaster.com 92415A862)
4 ea. 1/4×3-in. lag bolts to mount bearing blocks
2 ea. brass nipple, 1/2-in. NPT, 1 1/2-in.
8 ea. 1/4×4-in. hex bolts with flat washers and nuts for lower stretchers
12-in. 3/4-in. dia. electricians EMT cut into 8, 1 1/2-in. lengths (normally comes in 10 -ft. lengths)
4 ea. castors, 2 3/4-in. wheels seem ok

For caster mounting:
2 ea. Simpson Strong Tie deck and patio connector, ML267
8 ea 1/4×2-in. carriage bolts with nuts
8 ea 5/16×1-in. hex bolts with lock nuts
8 ea. 5/16×3-in. lag bolts

Bolts, lock nuts (or lock washers) and flat washers to mount your tools.

-- John Veazey





10 comments so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1262 posts in 889 days


#1 posted 06-03-2019 03:12 AM

Looks good, how is the ‘flipping’ action with the dewalt 735 hanging on there? They are quite heavy.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View SMP's profile

SMP

1058 posts in 300 days


#2 posted 06-03-2019 03:36 AM

Very cool. So here is a thought. Rather than changing the leg height, one option would by to cut a 3 1/2” vertical groove where the front and back bolts are, with perpindicular grooves top and bottom, forming a square “C” shape. Think of like workout equipent where you can place the bar on various pins. So you could slide the table bacwards an inch (or whatever the slot is), slide it up or down the vertical channel, then slide it forward into the slot and tighten it.

View zipmac22's profile

zipmac22

34 posts in 1247 days


#3 posted 06-03-2019 04:16 AM

Great job! I’ve been looking at making a couple of these carts since I’m short on space.

-- Chris, Central Texas

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2801 posts in 2742 days


#4 posted 06-03-2019 12:10 PM

Excellent work with a thorough, well written project post!!! I’m considering one of these for the new, smaller, shop to save some space.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View John Veazey's profile

John Veazey

13 posts in 275 days


#5 posted 06-03-2019 07:48 PM


Excellent work with a thorough, well written project post!!! I m considering one of these for the new, smaller, shop to save some space.

- EarlS


Thanks.

-- John Veazey

View John Veazey's profile

John Veazey

13 posts in 275 days


#6 posted 06-03-2019 07:49 PM



Great job! I ve been looking at making a couple of these carts since I m short on space.

- zipmac22


Thanks.

-- John Veazey

View John Veazey's profile

John Veazey

13 posts in 275 days


#7 posted 06-03-2019 07:54 PM



Great job! I ve been looking at making a couple of these carts since I m short on space.

- zipmac22


Looks good, how is the ‘flipping’ action with the dewalt 735 hanging on there? They are quite heavy.

- TungOil


Well I’m not very strong but I can handle it. You have to make sure the cords don’t get caught.

-- John Veazey

View TheSawDustWhisperer's profile

TheSawDustWhisperer

54 posts in 515 days


#8 posted 06-03-2019 09:54 PM

Great build. Was thinking about building one. Yours looks like the best I’ve seen.
Will the bolts and nuts in machine hanging upside down get vibrate lose of worse fall out?

I’m going to check with the manufacturer to find out if I hang my planer upside down bolted to a vibrating machine above it, will they honor the warranty?

-- One of these days I’m going to build a dust collection system. Dusty Lungs

View woodify's profile

woodify

329 posts in 2466 days


#9 posted 06-04-2019 02:04 AM

One of these flip top carts is on my to do list. Thanks for sharing the dimensions.

-- Woodify ~~ https://www.youtube.com/woodified?sub_confirmation=1

View John Veazey's profile

John Veazey

13 posts in 275 days


#10 posted 06-04-2019 03:37 AM



Great build. Was thinking about building one. Yours looks like the best I ve seen.
Will the bolts and nuts in machine hanging upside down get vibrate lose of worse fall out?

I m going to check with the manufacturer to find out if I hang my planer upside down bolted to a vibrating machine above it, will they honor the warranty?

- TheSawDustWhisperer


I used lock nuts on the bolts attaching the tools to the table. That’s a good question about the possible damage to a tool hanging upside down. I think it would be prudent to establish habits that prevented an upside down tool from accidentally being powered on, such as always using the off switch and maybe stowing the cord securely to the tool before flipping.

-- John Veazey

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