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Light Weight Crosscut Sled

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Project by DustyS06 posted 05-29-2019 10:56 PM 1295 views 15 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I finally got tired of having to use my large heavy sled for all my crosscut requirements so I finally built myself a sled, that will still handle almost all my crosscut needs, and is both light weight and smaller as well.

The sled’s base is made from 1/2” birch plywood measuring 24” L x 14” W with one of the corners trimmed off and nine 2” diameter holes to reduce the overall weight of the base. For the fence I used a piece of 1.5” x 1.5” aluminum angle to match the length of the base with a cut-out to clear the saw blade. To attach the fence to the base I used a couple of studded knobs which fit into T-nuts that rest in counterbores cut into the bottom of the base. To fancy things up a little I used black walnut to make both the front fence and the table saw blade guard. I added a small adjustable locking stop block which allows me to make multiple cuts of identical length with ease.

For a finish I applied three coats of gloss polyurethane sanding between each of the coats.

-- Dusty





11 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22995 posts in 3554 days


#1 posted 05-29-2019 11:48 PM

Cool lightweight sled, Dusty. Is that on a Ryobi table saw?

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View NotaJock's profile

NotaJock

164 posts in 1548 days


#2 posted 05-29-2019 11:56 PM

Looks good but a couple of questions if you please.
Can we see a pic of this sled from the bottom, how is the blade guard connected?
How does this look on the 5 cut test? I see no allowance for adjustment.
What kind of tablesaw is yours? You couldn’t get those pics from my old craftsman 10”.
Thanks,
Mike

-- Mike in SoCal, now East Texas

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4101 posts in 2437 days


#3 posted 05-30-2019 12:35 AM

That is a unique looking sled and a job well done.

I like smaller sleds more than larger ones.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3365 posts in 1023 days


#4 posted 05-30-2019 02:34 AM

I’m also wondering how to adjust the fence if a 5 cut says you need to move. Looks like the T Nutz would be tough to relocate a smidge over if needed. Heck even with a screw, you need a different hole.

Loving the shape, and with the 1/2” ply base, the cut outs, and lighter components it would be light, and easier to haul around.

-- Think safe, be safe

View htl's profile

htl

4760 posts in 1608 days


#5 posted 05-30-2019 04:54 AM

Should clear up a few things.

Nice job!!!

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View pottz's profile

pottz

5751 posts in 1433 days


#6 posted 05-30-2019 01:55 PM

good idea large sleds can get pretty heavy to lug around.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

2034 posts in 3530 days


#7 posted 05-30-2019 02:52 PM

Very nice.

-- Chris K

View Mainebarn's profile

Mainebarn

14 posts in 100 days


#8 posted 05-30-2019 02:52 PM

Nice. I like that!

-- Brian

View DustyS06's profile

DustyS06

25 posts in 498 days


#9 posted 05-31-2019 04:57 PM

Yes, it’s a Ryobi BT3000 Table Saw. Check out my BT3000 Ryobi Tablesaw/Router Workstation (my first project).

The holes in the left side of the rear fence are slightly larger than the diameter of the studded knobs . Therefore I’m able to make the minute adjustments necessary for the five cut method to the left side of the fence. Only the right side of the rear fence is firmly attached to the base. I actually started out by putting the right side of the base against the table saw fence as I knew it was parallel to both the saw blade and miter slots on the table saw. I then attached the UHMW plastic runners to the base and made the cut into the base prior to attaching the rear fence. Then I proceeded to the five cut process which came out to be within 0.0049 of 90 degrees on the second test. Lucked out I guess.

I glued and screwed the blade guard the the base.

-- Dusty

View DustyS06's profile

DustyS06

25 posts in 498 days


#10 posted 05-31-2019 04:59 PM

Yes, it’s a Ryobi BT3000 Table Saw. Check out my BT3000 Ryobi Tablesaw/Router Workstation (my first project).
The holes in the left side of the rear fence are slightly larger than the diameter of the studded knobs . Therefore I’m able to make the minute adjustments necessary for the five cut method to the left side of the fence. Only the right side of the rear fence is firmly attached to the base. I actually started out by putting the right side of the base against the table saw fence as I knew it was parallel to both the saw blade and miter slots on the table saw. I then attached the UHMW plastic runners to the base and made the cut into the base prior to attaching the rear fence. Then I proceeded to the five cut process which came out to be within 0.0049 of 90 degrees on the second test. Lucked out I guess.

I glued and screwed the blade guard the the base.

-- Dusty

View mafe's profile

mafe

12093 posts in 3538 days


#11 posted 06-04-2019 09:41 PM

Heavy weight cool it is.
Super build.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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