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C - Table with built in shelf

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Project by EdsCustomWoodCrafts posted 04-12-2019 01:40 AM 675 views 3 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My wife has a home office that she recently purchased a Chaise Lounger , its a model that doesn’t have any arms on it, so it makes it difficult to read or drink a cup of coffee at. So She asked me to come up with a idea of a table.
So I came across a lot of style’s of table that would work great but something stuck out about this style of table and mainly it was the joint that was used to assemble it, its called a finger joint (box joint) and its simply a series of fingers and slot that when mated together forms an extremely strong joint as well as looking very attractive and not as hard to complete as say a dovetail joint. My blog detailing this project goes into a lot more detail but these are the steps I took in making this project, but please feel free to click the below links for he Project Blog and Complete plans on making it.

Materials Needed

I wanted to use by some 1” x 12” Oak and Maple woods to make this but my home center didn’t have any so I opted to buy some 1” thick Stair threads so that is what I did. I basically ripped the bullnose edging of and I was at the races and for a fraction of the cost as well.

Crosscutting the parts

Once I ripped the bullnose edging that was on the workpieces I turned to my crosscut sled to cut them to final size and to be honest I spent more time in this project in the glue up than any other phase. This project only had 5 parts to it.


The Box Joint Jig

I actually didn’t have a box joint jig for my table saw so I went about making one, I actually put a lot of time into this jig because I really like using finger joints in projects so I put together this little jig for the table-saw that I found on www.instructables.comwww.instructables.com

Cutting the finger joints

With the jig built it was time to cut the box joints, since there were only 5 pieces project this didn’t take very long and within about 90 minutes I had cut all box joints into their respective parts. Some parts had both ends of a board jointed with box joints and other boards only needed 1 end with them.


I actually needed to add a sacrificial fence to my fence on the jig because a couple of the boards were too tall and felt a little on the nervous side running them through the 1/2” wide dado stack.

Dry Assembly & Clamping Aids

To aid me during the glue-ups I actually had another side project and that was to make some right angled clamping jigs I had some scrap MDF so I banged out about 6 of them to aid in the clamping of the table parts. It was crucial that all joints were at 90° because it only had 1 side to it and I didn’t want the table tipping over. I also always do a dry assembly to rehearse the glue up and know were to add clamps. This table took a week to glue up because I didn’t want to take a chance on working on a table section and the glue was not fully cured, so I added a piece of the table every day leaving the glue dry for 24 hours for each joint.


Here are the right angled clamping jigs


One section all clamped up.

Glue-Up

Like I had mentioned I glue up one section at a time so as that it had 24 hours to cure between project sections. I also used a few tricks to help me with limited cleanup of glue squeeze-out along the joint line, in theory you place tape adjacent to the joint so any squeeze out goes onto the tape and them once cured you just rip up the tape and you have a nice clean line, this worked great and I will be using this in the future.

Sanding

In between each glued up section I sanded the parts with 150 grit and finally once the table was assembled I used 220 grit that was probably overkill but I didn’t have any other grit other than courser grits.

Finished Table

I finally applied 3 coats of Minwax Polyacrylic finish and sanded in between each coat and I have to say that the table came out great and the wife is very happy.

Well that is all I have and thanks for reading, please feel free to check out my website where I blogged in more details and have plans for plans for for sale on my site.

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com





6 comments so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

4227 posts in 3481 days


#1 posted 04-12-2019 01:53 AM

Nice work and thanks for all the great build photos.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

931 posts in 1852 days


#2 posted 04-12-2019 02:32 AM



Nice work and thanks for all the great build photos.

- swirt

Thanks and your welcome after all this is a woodworking site although I love seeing the finished project I really like seeing behind the scenes pics

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

437 posts in 1801 days


#3 posted 04-12-2019 06:55 PM

A+

-- James E McIntyre

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

931 posts in 1852 days


#4 posted 04-12-2019 07:00 PM



Very nice design. The 90* braces were a great idea.
Thanks for posting your work process.

- James E McIntyre


Thanks James much appreciated .. yes the clamp jigs came in handy

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

437 posts in 1801 days


#5 posted 04-12-2019 08:05 PM

Very nice design. The 90* braces were a great idea.
Looks like you had 3 projects you could have posted in one.
Those are some strong looking finger joints.

Gotta look into those stair threads as an alternative wood source.
Thanks for posting your work process.

-- James E McIntyre

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile

woodshaver Tony C

6829 posts in 3862 days


#6 posted 04-17-2019 12:58 PM

Look great Ed… All those photos are nice to see! Nice work!

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

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