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Fuzzy Logic

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Project by DaDijionDon posted 02-20-2019 06:50 AM 1000 views 0 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I made this wall art using the scraps from an end grain cutting board I made. It was the first time I had ever sanded up to 3000 grit.. that was a game changer for me. The pictures are of (and it remains) an unfinished amalgamation of wood and glue. No finish whatsoever. I am pretty proud of this piece.. now I aspire to complicate the situation much further. It seems I’m perpetually driven to make things so complicated I can no longer understand what my goal is.

-- Listen!.... Do you smell that?





23 comments so far

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

14007 posts in 3165 days


#1 posted 02-20-2019 08:02 AM

This is indeed mindblowing pattern and some realy hard work. I like those different pattern wooden spoons too.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2197 posts in 871 days


#2 posted 02-20-2019 09:36 AM

“It seems I’m perpetually driven to make things so complicated I can no longer understand what my goal is.”

That’s kind of a goal in itself.

Interesting post. I imagine the 3000 grit will get you some weird feedback. I have also gone way past the prescribed 220 tops for ANYTHING thought process. Your initial pic of that “mirror” you’ve created is proof that there are some things that going forward with can net you.

Interesting post, thanks for sharing. Nice wall art BTW.

-- Think safe, be safe

View htl's profile

htl

4536 posts in 1457 days


#3 posted 02-20-2019 10:06 AM

It’s so nice, beautiful work !!!

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View DaDijionDon's profile

DaDijionDon

18 posts in 29 days


#4 posted 02-20-2019 10:16 AM

As far as sanding grits, I’ve even started going up to 10000 on some of my cutting boards. The mirror finish seems to repel water.. the obvious drawback being that Nothing penetrates, so the customary mineral oil beeswax finish won’t take either. But I have accounted for this, at least theoretically. I welcome any feedback if my assumptions are wrong, the last thing I would want to do is put out germ factories as cutting boards. But! Since I happen to have a rather large vacuum oven, that also works as a pressure chamber, I’ve started sanding some of my cutting boards all the way to 10000. Then Applying a very thick beeswax mineral oil mixture, more of a paste really, topping it off with a normal ratio wax/oil to make sure it stays completely submerged under vacuum. Beeswax melting point is around 140° so after pulling about half of the vac, when I can see the air fizzing out of the wood I’ll set the oven at 150°f and wait a couple hours (no convection in a vacuum so it takes longer to heat the whole mess up) before pulling a full vac. It’s amazing how long it takes for the wood to release all it’s air and stop fizzing so it sits overnight like this. Still at 150° I release the vacuum by opening a tank of nitrogen and actually reverse the whole situation by putting 50lb of positive pressure in.

My hypothesis being that all the empty capillaries will instead of filling with air, will fill with the thick mixture of beeswax/oil. (I use nitrogen because I want to avoid humidity entering the process… And really, just because the tank is there, why not?)
Turn off the heat, let cool, release the pressure,and voila! I get to have my mirror finish on a fully impregnated cutting board that doesn’t need to be oiled every month.

It occurs to me now that a) I should sterilize the beeswax before doing this process, and b) I have no idea what I’m talking about. ... And C) I should probably detail this whole thing in a proper forum to get educated feedback on process and pitfall…

Haha… Okay, didn’t really mean to go off on all that right now… Guess I’m a little excited by the possibilities. I’ve only just begun this line of experimenting.. so.. forgive me. Heh

-- Listen!.... Do you smell that?

View Mojo1's profile

Mojo1

280 posts in 2988 days


#5 posted 02-20-2019 01:15 PM

Verly interlesting!

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2769 posts in 1920 days


#6 posted 02-20-2019 02:20 PM

Very interesting indeed – being 76 yr and lazy, I’m pretty sure I’ll let you continue and be happy to read of your exploits

btw – I totally applaud your ingenuity and execution

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View sirthinkalot's profile

sirthinkalot

31 posts in 736 days


#7 posted 02-20-2019 03:03 PM

lota work in that board … as my dad would say you have a healthy dose of sticktoitiveness :)

I would be interested in hearing a bit more on your oven chamber sometime if you were willing I enjoy new processes and have am at the begining stages of setting up to do some wood stabilizing.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2573 posts in 1520 days


#8 posted 02-20-2019 03:12 PM

Impressive!

I had pondered putting CBs into a vacuum so the oil fully penetrated, your idea of adding the wax w/heat is clever!

I guess I’ll need to come up with some form of a box strong enough to withstand the negative pressure and try your ideas out.

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

1808 posts in 2001 days


#9 posted 02-20-2019 04:01 PM

Makes my eyes hurt, but I can certainly appreciate the work that went into that. When you say you sanded to 3000 grit, do they have sand paper that fine or do you use something like “Micromesh”, what most pen makers use? I just don’t see how you “sand” something that big, that fine… a compund, maybe.

Great piece.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View DaDijionDon's profile

DaDijionDon

18 posts in 29 days


#10 posted 02-20-2019 04:22 PM

I was really quite surprised at how quickly it went… At 1500 I switched to wet sanding, since I only do one face past 320 it saves a lot of time too. I figure I only spent 5 minutes… Maybe less… On each grit past 1000. At 1500 it seemed to cloud up (even without wet sanding) but after 2000 it starts to look like glass. Going to 10000 is obviously ridiculous… But it is does get slightly more glass like with each grit. So maybe not ridiculous… Let’s say overkill.

-- Listen!.... Do you smell that?

View BobHall's profile

BobHall

50 posts in 1582 days


#11 posted 02-20-2019 04:25 PM

Your board is beautiful! Your process of vacuum and heat is fascinating. I have often considered applying finish and then vacuum on smaller scales, but never anything so large! The heat makes perfect sense to liquify the finish too, but I’m not sure I follow the purpose of the nitrogen. And as an aside, I assume you are versed in the hazards of nitrogen?

-- Bob "jack of all trades, master of none"

View DaDijionDon's profile

DaDijionDon

18 posts in 29 days


#12 posted 02-20-2019 04:26 PM

I know some people use acrylic boxes for wood stabilization, which you can buy relatively inexpensively at bestvaluevacs. Com. And a standard Harbour freight vacuum pump works just fine…(make sure and put a ball valve in between the pump and your pot so you don’t suck the oil out of the pump into the vacuum)


Impressive!

I had pondered putting CBs into a vacuum so the oil fully penetrated, your idea of adding the wax w/heat is clever!

I guess I ll need to come up with some form of a box strong enough to withstand the negative pressure and try your ideas out.

- splintergroup


-- Listen!.... Do you smell that?

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2914 posts in 1238 days


#13 posted 02-20-2019 04:28 PM

Nice work and welcome to LJs. The unfinished finish is amazing.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View DaDijionDon's profile

DaDijionDon

18 posts in 29 days


#14 posted 02-20-2019 04:30 PM

I was not familiar with nitrogen asphyxiation, thank you for the heads up. I come from the Cannabis industry in northern California which is why I have a large vacuum oven in the first place. I take butane explosion very seriously, as such, it’s force of habit that I always have a powerful exhaust fan running when I am dealing with my vacuum oven. they’re actually wired in line so I don’t even have to think about it


but I m not sure I follow the purpose of the nitrogen. And as an aside, I assume you are versed in the hazards of nitrogen?

- BobHall


-- Listen!.... Do you smell that?

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

288 posts in 77 days


#15 posted 02-20-2019 04:31 PM

How was the pattern created?

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