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Tea Boxes with swoop designs

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Project by Jerrybox posted 12-17-2018 09:52 PM 1414 views 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These two tea boxes display a technique I read about in Fine Woodworking magazine, that of removing wood in an organic design and replacing it with a contrasting wood. I did quite a few of these as learning projects before I trusted my skill on one of my tea boxes. These two boxes are walnut with swoops of purple heart, Osage Orange and Birch. Corner splines of purple heart round out the box

I find this technique challenging having made many difficult to cover up mistakes trying them. The key is to start with very thin strips of wood to make the clamping easier. Even then, some wood in a thin format does not like to bend without cracking. I suspect there is a steaming or wetting procedure that might work – if anyone reading this has suggestions.

-- Jerrybox-Boxes Unlimited





13 comments so far

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

329 posts in 789 days


#1 posted 12-17-2018 10:39 PM

Beautiful Jerry! You were my inspiration to try that on my Tea Boxes. Thanks!

-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

867 posts in 2691 days


#2 posted 12-18-2018 01:59 AM

Looks like you persevered on this one with excellent results – congrats.

-- socrbent Ohio

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3116 posts in 996 days


#3 posted 12-18-2018 07:17 AM

Nice look. Unless those boxes are much bigger than they look to be, you’ve bent in some fairly wide strips by the look of it. The others I have seen are 1/8” or thinner, and some of them have been on fairly large cutting boards. Possible that some do, but on all of them I have seen video of, or read about they are bending without steam, just a lot of clamps.

BTW I do like your wider strips, they make much more of a statement.

Thanks for posting.

-- Think safe, be safe

View madts's profile

madts

1902 posts in 2761 days


#4 posted 12-18-2018 08:14 AM

Very nice.

—Madts.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

14668 posts in 3289 days


#5 posted 12-18-2018 01:02 PM

Nice curves and lines

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Noel's profile

Noel

77 posts in 229 days


#6 posted 12-18-2018 01:38 PM

Really beautiful boxes – inlays, of course, make the design. Well done – your practice is paying dividends.

-- Just make the cut

View Jerrybox's profile

Jerrybox

27 posts in 367 days


#7 posted 12-18-2018 09:42 PM

Actually these wide strips do consist of thinner material. I no longer have the box but I believe the widest strip consist of 4 pieces.

Do we still refer to this technique as inlay? In this procedure the base piece is completely sawed apart, equivalent amount of wood removed, then the two pieces with strip forced together and glued.. Maybe a better name would be “through lay”!!

Jerry

-- Jerrybox-Boxes Unlimited

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2828 posts in 2689 days


#8 posted 12-18-2018 11:01 PM

Jerry, you have built a beautiful box. I really like the colors and the technique.

Since you asked for input, I used a similar technique on this box top.
This is the posting I did on it. .

This “Through Lay” technique works especially well if you go around the box and match all four corners. I found that the best way is to start with a board about 3” thick, clamp 1/8 veneer into a curved band saw cut (start clamps in the middle), let your veneer strips be wider than the board and plane them flush after they dry. Finally re-saw your 3” board into 3/4 strips and plane them down to 5/8 to start building your box. Lay out the box from the center outward on a book-matched board long enough to make two adjoining sides, so all four edges match. If you start with a thin board the board will fold up as you apply the clamps.

-- Big Al in IN

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

329 posts in 789 days


#9 posted 12-19-2018 05:54 AM

I love that idea Al. Plus you end up with several identical boards with a fraction of the labor by resawing it.

Congrats Jerry on another well deserved DT3!

-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View Jerrybox's profile

Jerrybox

27 posts in 367 days


#10 posted 12-20-2018 06:48 PM

Al,

I have been looking for years how to do an organic line around the sides of a box with the line meeting perfectly at the mitered corners. Your comment above makes me think that you are suggesting doing just that. Yet, I don’t follow the procedure you describe. Can you elaborate? I follow starting with a thick piece, clamp in the strip(s) and cutting it into 3/4 ” strips, but I don’t see how the layout for the 4 box sides works.

Jerry

-- Jerrybox-Boxes Unlimited

View michaelmaloney's profile

michaelmaloney

45 posts in 1974 days


#11 posted 12-26-2018 02:34 AM

I do agree that “through lay” is a better term. It helps make a beautiful statement on an otherwise dull piece. I really have to pick up that skill.

-- Michael Maloney: http://supercheapselfstorage.com.au/facilities/gold-coast/self-storage/michael-maloney/

View michaelmaloney's profile

michaelmaloney

45 posts in 1974 days


#12 posted 12-26-2018 02:34 AM

I do agree that “through lay” is a better term. It helps make a beautiful statement on an otherwise dull piece. I really have to pick up that skill.

-- Michael Maloney: http://supercheapselfstorage.com.au/facilities/gold-coast/self-storage/michael-maloney/

View newTim's profile

newTim

615 posts in 4028 days


#13 posted 02-07-2019 05:56 AM

See blog: Secrets of the String Box revealed.

http://lumberjocks.com/newTim/blog/series/3091

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com

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