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Cross-Cut Sled (From reclaimed wood...LOL)

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Project by Hawgnutz posted 12-01-2007 12:53 AM 11688 views 9 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, the weather called for overcast and intermittent rain, here, so I could not undertake any new major projects, or finish my boxes due to humidity. So my mind turned to making one of my minor projects—I had some old maple or beech I salvaged from pallets and I had a 12×24 piece of 1/2” ply laying by my bench… looks like I got the makings for a cross-cut sled. Yessiree Bob! I had some mahogany that was narrow and fit perfectly in my 3/4” miter slot that was used for the runners. I resawed them to about 5/16×3/4” thickness and glued them to the bottom of the plywood base. I used some #6×3/4” counter sunk screws to further secure them.

Troubles came when I tried to rip the fence from the salvaged wood. I got about 14” into the rip of the salvaged wood when my table saw got bound up. Terrible time getting the wood out. Seems the humidity expanded the wood, and coupled with the fact that I was ripping right trough the center rings of the wood all added up to a bind. See the picture below and you can see how the wood is trying to warp around the cut.

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So, I found a piece of redwood 3×4 left over from a fencing project. I ripped it 2 1/2” high and glued and screwed the back fence to 1/2” plywood cut 12”x24.”

I only screwed one corner of the front fence so I could use my expensive shims to ensure a 90 degree cut. I temorarily screwed a block of wood close to front fence edge opposite of pivot screw and clamped the free end of teh front fence to it. I then used my shims (see them in the plastic bag…LOL) and added or substracted them until the fence was exactly 90 degrees from the blade.

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Use a precision square to make sure it is 90 degrees!

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Then I used the pieces from the salvaged wood I first tried to rip and made a protective fence to keep stray fingers AWAY from the blade when it exits the sled. (Kinda gorilla engineering, but it works real gooder!)
I also added a plexiglass cover over the blade for my protection from flying debris and the spinning blade! (One sugestion when drilling plexiglass—Use old drill bit you won’t mind getting melted plastic all in the channels. It took me a little time to clear mine! LOL Lessons learned the hard way!)

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The plexiglass is close to the blade when the blade is fully extended.

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The weather continued to threaten and I could feel moisture on my skin, so I packed it all up and headed inside.

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Here is the finished project stored away, but ready at a moments—or a few minutes—notice!

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Now, I won’t feel unsafe or hesitant to crosscut smaller pieces.

-- Saving barnwood from the scrapyards





13 comments so far

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 5176 days


#1 posted 12-01-2007 01:03 AM

You Arizona boys, let a little rain drop scare you out!!! The chop box looks good, Marc. That is a good trick for everyone to pay attention to. The one with the block of wood and the playing cards. That looks a lot easier than the way I did mine. You will be glad you have this and want a great big one next.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 5176 days


#2 posted 12-01-2007 01:03 AM

You Arizona boys, let a little rain drop scare you out!!! The chop box looks good, Marc. That is a good trick for everyone to pay attention to. The one with the block of wood and the playing cards. That looks a lot easier than the way I did mine. You will be glad you have this and want a great big one next.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Hawgnutz's profile

Hawgnutz

526 posts in 5290 days


#3 posted 12-01-2007 01:26 AM

LOL…. I remember BAD storms! This little piss-ant rain ain’t nothin. But it is hard to work outside with power tools and then hustle to get em all in when the rain starts. And me with 2 bad legs using a crutch, too….LOL

YOU remember how we don’t get rain too often, but when we do it is feast, not famine. Just a steady drizzle since I got inside, but I am sure glad I got this done. It has been on my “to-do” list for a while.

(By the way, Tom…. You must have thought your comment was affully IMPORTANT—you said it twice…LOL)

God Bless,
Hawg

-- Saving barnwood from the scrapyards

View ben's profile

ben

158 posts in 5084 days


#4 posted 12-01-2007 02:22 AM

what’s a blade made of when it’s shiny gold like that?

View Hawgnutz's profile

Hawgnutz

526 posts in 5290 days


#5 posted 12-01-2007 02:46 AM

The blade is a Ridgid 50-tooth combo. It is a great blade and only $40.00! It is a non-stick coating. I got one for my circular saw, too.

God Bless,
Hawg

-- Saving barnwood from the scrapyards

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16292 posts in 5432 days


#6 posted 12-01-2007 02:53 AM

Nice sled, Hawg.

I get good service out of that blade too.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View David's profile

David

1969 posts in 5353 days


#7 posted 12-01-2007 03:04 AM

Hawg -

Very nice sled . . . I like the plexiglas protector!

David

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14578 posts in 5280 days


#8 posted 12-02-2007 08:11 AM

Nice sled Hawg. And to think it was basically free – except for the work involved.

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View mot's profile

mot

4928 posts in 5250 days


#9 posted 12-02-2007 06:32 PM

Yeah, the plexiglass is a great idea. It looks like it does the job!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

26812 posts in 5065 days


#10 posted 12-03-2007 11:31 PM

Good sled Hawg. I like the safety shield. The humidity down under is bad at the moment doors are sticking & the air is dense.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View btn's profile

btn

2 posts in 4389 days


#11 posted 09-15-2009 07:25 PM

I appreciate your comment “hustle to get em all in when the rain starts”. One looks at the woodworking magazines and sees all the fancy dry heated well-lit shops. My tools live in the garage, I work in the driveway. It is not easy to work in heavy clothes (freeze your fingers for precise stuff). I give up when the temperature drops below -10C. (some power tool cords go stiff)

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118200 posts in 4791 days


#12 posted 09-16-2009 06:58 AM

that”s a nice one well done

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2496 posts in 4321 days


#13 posted 02-21-2010 08:21 AM

Next time you drill anything other than wood dip your bit in liquid dish soap. Works great on your bandsaw blades when you cut aluminum too.

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