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regular-size table spoons for eating

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Project by harum posted 03-22-2018 06:13 PM 2816 views 5 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Always wanted to make wooden spoons that would look like regular table spoons and could actually be used for eating, not stirring/scooping/serving. Their shape, size, and curves are modeled after a stainless steel spoon, except that I made them a bit deeper to hold more soup. I specifically shaped the front half of the spoons somewhat pointy and with less curve, which makes picking up small bits from the plate possible—just like in the stainless steel “original”. The thickness of the walls is around 1/8” or less; they are light.

Tools used: a band saw, spoon chisel, band sander, and files. The woods are walnut, padauk, and cherry—all from the scrap bin at the local lumber yard. Finished with whatever was inside the old “Watco Butcher Block Oil and Finish” can (which, when freshly opened, is mostly a mixture of solvents with some alkyd resin and some tung oil)—hope it’s still good despite some polymerized clear and white chunks in it—at least it still smells like tung oil.

Will see how they keep their shape and color.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."





12 comments so far

View Northwest29's profile

Northwest29

1710 posts in 3608 days


#1 posted 03-22-2018 07:43 PM

Very nicely done.

-- Ron, "Curiosity is a terrible thing to waste."

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

420 posts in 1797 days


#2 posted 03-22-2018 08:50 PM

Neat! Very even and clean lines.

I’ve done a few spoons, but only a couple of moderately successful eating spoons. Problem I have with eating spoons is that they get fuzzy, which can be unpleasant. I’ve tried to mitigate the fuzzies by finishing the spoons with a knife rather than sanding, which helps a lot, but without sanding they turn out a bit more “rustic” than yours are.

View harum's profile

harum

422 posts in 2761 days


#3 posted 03-22-2018 09:17 PM

Thanks!


...
Problem I have with eating spoons is that they get fuzzy, which can be unpleasant.
...
- Jeremymcon

Yes, “fuzzy” spoons won’t do. Let’s see if several rounds of raising grain – drying – sanding will take care of this. I’ve also read that some woods give “fuzzier” spoons.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View Joe's profile

Joe

568 posts in 2204 days


#4 posted 03-22-2018 11:28 PM

You did a great job making those spoons. I hope they hold up to everyday use too. Let use know. Thanks

-- CurleyJoe, "You only learn from your mistakes"

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

420 posts in 1797 days


#5 posted 03-22-2018 11:32 PM

Yes that will definitely help! Walnut has been particularly difficult for me to keep smooth by that method, but I will admit that I generally give up after 3 or 4 successive wettings/drying. The cherry will respond better, in my experience. Good luck!

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

4385 posts in 2805 days


#6 posted 03-23-2018 12:38 AM

Those are really nice. They look perfectly uniform.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html -- ~Non multa sed multum~

View Paul Mayer's profile

Paul Mayer

1154 posts in 4183 days


#7 posted 03-23-2018 02:31 PM

Great job!

-- Paul Mayer, http://youtube.com/c/toolmetrix

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

16848 posts in 3985 days


#8 posted 03-23-2018 04:47 PM

Pretty cool wood colour splash.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View harum's profile

harum

422 posts in 2761 days


#9 posted 03-23-2018 05:00 PM

Appreciate the kind words! Here is the spoon chisel/knife I used for carving the inside bowl. It’s 1-1/2” in diameter and double edged, which makes it twice as useful as one-edged ones, especially for the left-handed.

What are good ways to sharpen it? Just sand paper on a dowel?

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View Rob Drown's profile

Rob Drown

837 posts in 4951 days


#10 posted 02-02-2021 07:42 PM

I just carved a walnut spoon finished with just olive oil and after use it has the fuzzies. To what grit should I sand or is a knife better?

How may cycles are required to get this stuff useable?

Thanks for your help. Maybe this should be in a forum

-- The expectations of life depend upon diligence; the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools. Confucius, 经过艰苦的努力的梦想可以成真

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

420 posts in 1797 days


#11 posted 02-03-2021 11:55 PM

Walnut definitely likes to get fuzzy! Sand as fine as your patience allows, I go to 1000 grit with walnut. Wet, sand with the finest grit again, repeat until it stops fuzzing.

View harum's profile

harum

422 posts in 2761 days


#12 posted 05-09-2021 04:22 AM



I just carved a walnut spoon finished with just olive oil and after use it has the fuzzies. To what grit should I sand or is a knife better?

How may cycles are required to get this stuff useable?

- Rob Drown

Olive oil? I thought it could go rancid and definitely wouldn’t provide much protection. I went through several cycles of wetting/sanding with 220, then 400. I gave these spoons away as soon as I finished them, so don’t really know how they perform. However, I made another spoon which I soaked in a 1:1 mixture by volume of fresh pure tung oil and the citrus solvent and then applied several coats of pure tung oil with 600 grit sanding between coats. Looks really shiny and feels hard. It’s a great finish when fresh oil is used. Old oil never cures in my hands, even though it doesn’t look any different.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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