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Project by tyvekboy posted 08-02-2010 01:08 AM 8029 views 4 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Aug 2, 2010

Think outside the box.

Here are some uses for Tyvek Homewrap besides wrapping homes with it.

GRILL COVER (Picture #1)
When my store bought grill cover started to fall apart, I decided to make one out of TYVEK. I used the old one as a pattern and made this one. If I were to make another one, I would make the top part of it out of two layers laminated with contact cement. It would be more waterproof than this one.

TOOL COVERS (Picture #2)
To help keep the dust off my machine tool, I made TYVEK tool covers. All seams are with contact cement. Since this is a basement shop, if there is ever a water leak, tools will stay dry.

UMBRELLA REPAIR (Pictures #3-#6)
I had an umbrella that worked fine but the material was falling apart. I took a pattern off the old one and made a new one out of TYVEK. Seams again were made with contact cement. The nice think about TYVEK is that you can sew through it and it won’t rip out. The umbrella has to be sewn onto the frame of the umbrella. As you can see in picture 6, you can even braid tiny strips of Tyvek into “rope” which I used to tie the umbrella when closed.
(Wish I knew how to rotate pictures in these postings.)

Hope this gives you all some ideas of other uses of Tyvek.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized





19 comments so far

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2601 posts in 3985 days


#1 posted 08-02-2010 06:03 AM

I kinda beg to differ, if it is used to protect your tools it is woodworking related. The umbrella might be an exception. Nice creative use of tyvek!

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20000 posts in 4643 days


#2 posted 08-02-2010 06:15 AM

I guess you’re covering wood working tools and the umbrella has a wooden handle ;-)) Can you buy it in small quanities?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20000 posts in 4643 days


#3 posted 08-02-2010 06:19 AM

BTW, rotate before you download

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 4026 days


#4 posted 08-02-2010 01:18 PM

Great idea and easy to make. However, I would be concerned about the potential for moisture condensation on the cast iron tops of my tools causing rust if the cover was to stay on for an extended period. I’ve always heard that tool covers should be made of a breathable fabric/material. Here in Alabama, the humidity gets so high sometimes that this could really be an issue.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View rance's profile

rance

4274 posts in 4127 days


#5 posted 08-02-2010 01:26 PM

Nice job. I’m guessing that for tool covers, the Tyvek allows it to breathe so there’s less rusting?

I made a Wind Sock using Tyvek and a 5 gallon bucket. I sewed it though. Worked great. I’ve considered making a kite or two from it. I saw in one of your other projects that you are interested in other uses, you might look into using it for the sail of a hang glider. Don’t know if I’d get under that one though.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

2092 posts in 3980 days


#6 posted 08-02-2010 06:09 PM

I didn’t mean to cause such a stir with this TIP but posted it to open up options. For example, ROCKLER is now selling a dust catcher called FastCap® that looks like a tent that goes around your Miter Saw. I looked at that and wondered if I couldn’t make one similar to that with Tyvek.

You could also use it in the winter time if you park your car outside. Cut a piece of it big enough to cover your windshield and long enough to close in your front doors of your car or truck. When it snows, ices or frosts overnight, you come out and just remove it and no snow, ice or frost on your windshield. Unlike plastic which would do the same thing, it wouldn’t freeze and crack like plastic would … i think. It’s easy to store and is durable. In your car you could also use it as an emergency ground cover if you had to work on your car (change a tire) and were in your go-to-church clothes and didn’t want to get them dirty.

RANCE – Funny thing you mentioned making a kite with Tyvek. I was just reading the Sept. 2010 issue of Popular Mechanics and on page 122 there was an article on building just that. I think your wind sock idea was good. I thought about making a hang glider out of it. I should work. But like you, I don’t know if I’d get under it. It is tough stuff though. What did the Wright brothers use?

DOCHOLLADAY – I don’t know if there would be condensation under the cover. I think for condensation to occur, you would have to have 2 disimmilar temperatures. Also, the cover is opened on the bottom so there is sufficient air circulation. What the cover really does is keep dust off of cast iron tool tops. Dust attracts moisture and moisture causes rust.

TOPAMAXSURVIVOR – When I looked at that sideways picture I said huh?.. So I looked at the photo that I was downloading and it looked ok. I did take that picture with the camera turned sideways. I guess when photos are uploaded here they are automatically turned with the wide side on the sides and the skinny sides on the top and bottom. Got to experiment with it more.

You can buy it in rolls that are about 3-4 feet wide and about 150 feet long. However I prefer to get the 9 foot wide rolls that are about 150 feet long for about $150.00 at Lowes (or for more at HD). I cut my sail for my sailboat out of one piece with no seams.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 3907 days


#7 posted 08-02-2010 08:17 PM

You are indeed the TYVEK boy!

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20000 posts in 4643 days


#8 posted 08-02-2010 09:15 PM

Your puter probably displays them in the proper orientaion. My Nikon system has me do it manually which is good and bad; everything has a price on it’s head ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20000 posts in 4643 days


#9 posted 08-02-2010 09:16 PM

Forgot to say when you paste it here, it looses the auto orientation and shows the way it is saved in youir system.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Ken Fitzpatrick's profile

Ken Fitzpatrick

376 posts in 4990 days


#10 posted 08-03-2010 03:53 PM

What a great idea with so many uses. Thanks for posting. I’m on my way to buy a roll

-- • "I have noticed that nothing I have never said ever did me any harm."....... Calvin Coolidge

View swirt's profile

swirt

5850 posts in 3939 days


#11 posted 08-03-2010 04:22 PM

Really clever ideas, with some applications for woodworking. Thanks.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View rmac's profile

rmac

235 posts in 4027 days


#12 posted 08-04-2010 05:28 AM

Alex,

Two questions about the contact cement:

1. What kind do you use?

2. Do you apply it to both surfaces, let it tack up, and then stick them together in the way that contact cement is usually used? Or do you use some other technique with the Tyvek?

Thanks,

—Russ

-- My table saw laughs at hot dogs. http://thesorteddetails.blogspot.com/

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

2092 posts in 3980 days


#13 posted 08-04-2010 02:36 PM

RMAC—I use the aromatic contact cement …. the kind that they ask to see your ID when you buy it at the big box stores. I do apply it to two sides and let it tack up before I stick them together.

TIP: If you want to align the pieces before sticking it togeher (like when I’m making my boats) I use a “slip sheet” or a piece of scrap Tyvek without any glue on it between the two surfaces that have contact cement on them. This allows you to align it and then all you have to do is pull out the slip sheet and stick the pieces together.

ANOTHER TIP: You can also do such things as when making a bag, add a “tunnel” through which you can pass a draw string or even a bungie cord. In the case of the grill cover, I just stuck on long straps on the surface with those plastic clip-buckels that are on back packs to hold it on.

Hope this gives you more ideas.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View rmac's profile

rmac

235 posts in 4027 days


#14 posted 08-04-2010 05:52 PM

Alex,

Thanks for the hints! There are no boats in my future, but I am definitely going to make a BBQ cover or two.

—Russ

-- My table saw laughs at hot dogs. http://thesorteddetails.blogspot.com/

View Claymation's profile

Claymation

165 posts in 3783 days


#15 posted 09-24-2010 02:50 AM

Makes the shop look like a morgue ! ;-)

-- Clay (Master Kindler) ~ Central VA

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