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Router Lift - Stumpy Nubs' Design

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Project by sonnyr posted 05-31-2017 08:23 PM 3730 views 2 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This router lift was made utilizing Stumpy Nubs’ Design and Plans. The top is made using phenolic, the fence is left over from an old Craftsman router table and the hand crank is a 5” long 1/2” extension and a 1 1/8” socket with a wooden handle. Interchangeable Incra inserts are inlaid in the top. Dust collection is provided using a 2” connection in the back. The power switch in front turns the router and shop vac on together. A Porter Cable 690LR router is mounted on the lift.
Thanks for viewing

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!





15 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

25912 posts in 4112 days


#1 posted 05-31-2017 10:55 PM

Pretty cool!!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Terry Thompson's profile

Terry Thompson

21 posts in 1482 days


#2 posted 05-31-2017 11:26 PM

Very nice, I had seen his plans for this but had already built one from Shop Notes. I like it but I still don’t have it where want it. Some more fiddling with it and it will get there. How happy are you with yours?

-- Terry, Virginia

View sonnyr's profile

sonnyr

144 posts in 3135 days


#3 posted 05-31-2017 11:58 PM

Terry – I like it’s small footprint and the ability to easily set this up and have it ready all the time using round over bits, while having another stand alone router table ready for other jobs. I have invested in Incra products so I can use those inserts on this table.
Thank you for your comments

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

4583 posts in 2284 days


#4 posted 06-01-2017 02:09 AM

Very nice except you put the shop vac hose in the wrong position it should be at the top. You can just turn the back panel over. Bill Pentz writes:

On 1/23/04 Jim Dobbs reminded me to, “Be careful to not pull air from the top of a router. This is opposite to the direction that the router fan pushes air through the router. By pulling air from the top, you will stall the cooling air flow and burn up the router. I always put my vacuum collection in line with the cutter (edge routing) or just below the table (face routing). I learned this from experience on my first router”.

I also built a Stumpy Nubs router lift last week and made the same mistake.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

View sonnyr's profile

sonnyr

144 posts in 3135 days


#5 posted 06-01-2017 03:31 AM

Combo Prof – Thanks for the advice.

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32122 posts in 3873 days


#6 posted 06-01-2017 04:43 PM

This is an excellent router table and you did a wonderful job on it. Stumpy’s design looks like it worked out great and it will be a fine addition to your shop.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

7851 posts in 3807 days


#7 posted 06-01-2017 04:56 PM

Looks like you made it larger than mine. I love to see people add their own modifications to customize my designs to their needs. Great job!

As for the dust collection, I hear what Don is saying, but placing a dust collection hookup below a router is a very common practice that has been used for many years. There are commercial products that enclose the router beneath an existing table, and add a dust collection port there as well. In theory, what Pentz says makes sense. But in actual practice, in an average hobby-level shop, I have never heard of it being a problem. Most woodworkers only run their router for a few minutes at a time. If you were to run it for a very long period of time, you may wish to pop off the back panel and let the router’s fan do the cooling without any lower dust collection.

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

4583 posts in 2284 days


#8 posted 06-01-2017 05:19 PM

James I did think about what you say, i.e. it won’t be a problem for the hobby shop, but then it was such an easy fix. just turn he the panel so that the hole is at the top I thought it worth the mention.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

View sonnyr's profile

sonnyr

144 posts in 3135 days


#9 posted 06-01-2017 07:05 PM

Stumpy – Thank you for your comments, it means a lot to me to have the input. I followed your plan dimensions, so it just looks larger in the pictures. One thing that can’t be seen is that I drilled holes in the nuts and set pins to keep the nuts from backing off.
Again, thanks everyone for your input.

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

4583 posts in 2284 days


#10 posted 06-01-2017 07:50 PM

Sonny that sounds like a good idea. I was able to with the ratchet to get the screw to thread off the lower nut. I had to take the lift apart and re-epoxy.

Did you notice the mistake in step 10 it says 1 1/4 and should be 2 1/4, however Figure 12 shows it correctly?

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

View sonnyr's profile

sonnyr

144 posts in 3135 days


#11 posted 06-01-2017 10:56 PM

Combo – concerning step 10, to be honest I built this lift about 2 months ago (just now found time to publish it) and don’t remember this discrepancy. I made some small modifications so that the PC 690LR router would fit. Among them, gluing the 4 “routing mounting blocks” all together; there wasn’t enough space to do otherwise. Earlier when I said “set pins” I really meant allen set screws. Man, I hate getting old, it’s like the old joke about being able to hide your own Easter eggs.

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

4583 posts in 2284 days


#12 posted 06-02-2017 01:18 AM

You sound like me. I may wait a couple of months befor publishing. I also had to put the router mounting blocks adjacent. But I installed a 2 hp Drill Master, because I had it. I think the Drill Master is a Dewalt clone. When it burns out maybe I’ll get a pc. By the way the alternative to getting old is far worse.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

View Tim Royal 's profile

Tim Royal

321 posts in 2493 days


#13 posted 01-05-2019 11:23 PM

Great job! Love the parts scrounging too! That Workmate is one of my favorite things… Mine looks about that used too!

-- -Tim Royal -"Pride makes us artificial and humility makes us real." -Thomas Merton

View TimBridge's profile

TimBridge

60 posts in 2579 days


#14 posted 01-27-2021 01:35 PM

Awesome! I just got all the parts I need for this build. Planning to start it … eventually. I was wondering—can you share where you sourced the phenolic plate from? I can find thinner/smaller ones but I plan to slip my build into the wing of my table saw so I need a larger piece. I was originally planning to get a smaller phenolic plate and then inlay it into a sheet of melamine or something similar—but if I can get a sheet large enough of phenolic—all the better!

-- Tim Bridge, Northern NJ, “All my life, I’ve had one dream: to achieve my many goals.”

View sonnyr's profile

sonnyr

144 posts in 3135 days


#15 posted 01-27-2021 03:06 PM

TimBridge- Unfortunately for your needs, about 8 years ago, I purchased some phenolic router table tops (CraigsList Ad) from someone who got them from a company that went out of business near San Antonio, Texas.
Good luck on your project. I love StumpyNub’s design and having it available to do something while my main router is set up for big jobs.

-- I may be slow, but I'm easy to stop!!!

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