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Yer' Basic Shooting (Chuting) Board

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Project by rwyoung posted 04-03-2010 10:19 PM 4195 views 6 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

On Sunday’s I work over at the Kansas City Woodworkers Guild shop, mostly on the handtool collection. Fettling, sharpening, etc. But I’ve also been building some of the basic shop appliances. So far I’ve make a couple bench-hooks, a pair of winding sticks and a carving jack for the other shop rats to use.

Today I made a shooting (chuting) board to donate. This one has an adjustable fence (about +/- 1 degree). The #5 is for scale. I’ll be making the miter jacks for it next.

There are several guild members who have professed to wanting to learn more about handtool use so I’m hoping that some of them will look at this shooting board, copy it and figure out how to make improvements for their own versions.

This is about the simplest version of an adjustable fence type I could think to make. 20” deep, 12” wide working surface. Fence is 3/4” (shooting thicker material than that is freakin’ tough). The ramp area is about 3-1/2” wide. 1” cleat on the bottom. The base is 1/2” MDF and the work surface is 3/4” plywood. Coat of wax on the MDF, plywood and fence get no finish. The fence is attached with three 1/4-20 bolts and washers. In the 3/4” ply beneath the fence are three 1/4-20 threaded inserts. The three holes in the fence increase in diameter from 1/4” to a wobbled-out 5/16” at the far end of the fence. This allows the fence to pivot just a little bit for the adjustment.

Ultra-fine tuning of the angle can be done with blue-tape on the fence face.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.





10 comments so far

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

5038 posts in 5076 days


#1 posted 04-03-2010 11:21 PM

I gotta make one of these. I keep putting it off, but having one would certainly encourage me to reach for my hand planes more often. Thanks for posting!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Marc5's profile

Marc5

304 posts in 4683 days


#2 posted 04-03-2010 11:24 PM

I built one a couple years ago when I took a plane class and have found it to be indispensable. It is a quick way to tune up a end cut. Even if you are a power tool junkie I think this could come in handy. Glad to read others are seeing the benefit and/or joy in using hand tools.

Thanks for sharing.

-- Marc

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1512 posts in 4806 days


#3 posted 04-04-2010 01:36 AM

nice. since i built mine i’ve also found it indispensable. i made mine tunable using pretty much the same method as you did, but i added a dab of hot glue during my last calibration/setup in order to keep it fixed into place. I found that the force of the plane hitting the wood was gradually knocking the fence out of alignment, even though i was cracking down on the fence screws. since then it has stayed put.

View michelletwo's profile

michelletwo

2795 posts in 4357 days


#4 posted 04-04-2010 01:01 PM

hey rwy, nice board. What’s the chuting? I have never seen that. Care to enlighten me? Old spelling of shooting?

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

412 posts in 4813 days


#5 posted 04-04-2010 03:45 PM

@michelletwo -

I remember seeing the term “chute” and “chuting board” in some older books. I don’t know if it is an old spelling or if the “chute” just refers to the side where the plane rides.

@AaronK -

The simple solution I have done for a slipping fence is to glue sandpaper (medium high grit but it probably doesn’t matter) to the bottom side of the fence. That really bumps up the friction and stops the fence from sliding. Did NOT do it to this one, that is one of the “innovations” I’m hoping the “newbies” come up with on their own after using it. :)

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1512 posts in 4806 days


#6 posted 04-04-2010 04:17 PM

comforting to know that im not the only one with that problem! actually your sandpaper idea is probably better than mine.

View snewOevaD's profile

snewOevaD

26 posts in 4126 days


#7 posted 01-27-2011 03:19 PM

Newbie to hand planes here! I have a couple questions…
1. Does this shooting board slowly eat itself up? does the blade eat away the the base a bit every time you work on a piece?
2. If so, do you have a way to quickly replace the base, or quickly replace the perpendicular board?

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

412 posts in 4813 days


#8 posted 01-27-2011 04:24 PM

No. Look closely at the average bench plane. The blade does not go all the way across, there is approximately 1/8” of metal on the sole next to the blade. This is what registers against the lower edge of the ramp. The blade will remove material from the side of the board above this 1/8” but eventually stop. So long as you always use the same plane and always have the blade projection the same (or nearly so) you will not destroy the board.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1512 posts in 4806 days


#9 posted 01-27-2011 04:31 PM

that’s why shooting boards are so awesome :-)

View snewOevaD's profile

snewOevaD

26 posts in 4126 days


#10 posted 01-27-2011 10:57 PM

I need to do two things…
1. Recondition the blade in the hand plane my Dad left me
2. Make a shooting board…

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