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carbide insert roughing tool

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Project by John Daugherty posted 01-17-2010 04:27 AM 3261 views 5 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here’s a few pictures of a roughing tool I made for myself using a carbide insert. It’ll really hog off the wood!





8 comments so far

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 3373 days


#1 posted 01-17-2010 04:45 AM

Great job. Boy, I wish I knew how to work with metal like this. As you know, you have replicated a commercially available tool that sells for $100 without the handle. The cutter only costs $13.95 so I paid $96 for the metal that inserts in the handle and holds the cutter. I know that’s a rip-off but the commercially available tool is a great tool. I’m sure yours is just as great.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View MShort's profile

MShort

1797 posts in 3717 days


#2 posted 01-17-2010 05:59 AM

Great looking tool. We just had a demo at our club meeting this week with one of these and boy does it hog out the wood.

-- Mike, Missouri --- “A positive life can not happen with a negative mind.” ---

View StevenAntonucci's profile

StevenAntonucci

355 posts in 4237 days


#3 posted 01-17-2010 03:28 PM

I was dumbfounded when I saw the price of that tool in the catalogs. I know that you can get the cutters for a few bucks, and you can probably sharpen one with a diamond hone and a little elbow grease, but lots of folks have fallen into the hysteria that this is the best way to rough out blanks (it’s not by a long shot!)

Glad to see someone making it at least. I much prefer a bowl gouge on its side for roughing cuts, as it’s much faster and cleaner. Given enough horsepower, I can pull a 1” wide shaving and be round in 1-2 passes.

Did you burn the handle in?

-- Steven

View John Daugherty's profile

John Daugherty

33 posts in 3735 days


#4 posted 01-17-2010 08:10 PM

Steven,

It has a 1/2 inch tang 2 1/2 inches long that I epoxied into the handle.

Help me understand, what do you mean burn the handle in?

View StevenAntonucci's profile

StevenAntonucci

355 posts in 4237 days


#5 posted 01-18-2010 03:14 AM

If it was square, you drill a close sized round hole, and then heat the square section with a torch. You can then “burn in the square” with the back end of the tool. A small chamfer gets you started, but the rest is accomplish with a lot of smoke and a mallet.

Guess you machined the square round?

-- Steven

View John Daugherty's profile

John Daugherty

33 posts in 3735 days


#6 posted 01-18-2010 03:16 PM

Yes the tang was turned round. Thanks for explaining. I’ll have to remember that trick.

View StevenAntonucci's profile

StevenAntonucci

355 posts in 4237 days


#7 posted 01-19-2010 03:03 AM

If you look at old toos with square tangs (like carving gouges), I believe that’s how they set the handles. If I have a long tang, I drill a stepped hole that is smaller than the tang the whole way down and then drive the tang about hallf way, remove and reheat and then drive it the rest of the way. You don’t need to make the tang orange, just hot enough…

No glues or epoxies required, and I’ve never had one come out…

-- Steven

View Rudy Reyes - CCWoodcrafts's profile

Rudy Reyes - CCWoodcrafts

34 posts in 3269 days


#8 posted 04-02-2012 11:18 PM

GREAT JOB … where did you purchase the insert and what size of screw and tap did you use?

-- Rudy Reyes - CCWoodcrafts - Corpus Christi, Texas

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