LumberJocks

Stutz restoration

  • Advertise with us
Project by Ken Reed posted 09-09-2009 03:00 AM 3150 views 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was a project I did a number of years ago…before I got a digital camera so the photos are just scans of snapshots.

The car is a 1932 DV32 Stutz. I did NOT restore the entire car…I just did the woodwork. Back in the day all cars were built like coaches: they were framed with wood and just skinned over with metal or wicker or wood or leather….

The first shot is the car at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, which is sorta like the World Series of car shows; quite posh, cars are shown by invitation only. The next two shots are of the car the way I received it….not much to go on! My buddy and I kinda made it up as we went along because the car is a one off. (Actually only the back was much of a mystery as I had the doors and the cowl so those shapes were a given.) The last picture was the car “in process”. We did the woodwork that shows on the interior as well; door garnish moldings and some other trim but the pictures seem to have evaporated. If they turn up I’ll post them.

All the cars that I did (there were quite a few) I did utilizing the WEST System (Wood Epoxy Saturation Technique). This is a great product and sure helped out a lot as once the wood was glued up it was incredibly strong and the epoxy has great gap filling properties so we could “fudge” a bit by cutting mortises a bit loose and adjusting the part on the car. I don’t think this wood will need to be replaced in the next fifty years! The encapsulation of the wood will keep it from rotting ever again.





15 comments so far

View tooldad's profile

tooldad

665 posts in 4720 days


#1 posted 09-09-2009 03:50 AM

impressive.

Welcome to LJ!

View Innovator's profile

Innovator

3589 posts in 4419 days


#2 posted 09-09-2009 04:30 AM

Its hard to believe it is the same car.

Nice job.

-- Whether You Think You Can or You Think You Can't, YOU ARE RIGHT!!!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118161 posts in 4582 days


#3 posted 09-09-2009 04:34 AM

Another beauty Ken great job

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View Moron's profile

Moron

5048 posts in 4899 days


#4 posted 09-09-2009 04:45 AM

I rarely have time to look at another mans work but I gotta say

“Sweet”......”very Nice Work”.....Impeccable”

another “Blue Ribbon”!

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13494 posts in 4779 days


#5 posted 09-09-2009 05:46 AM

Very impressive restoration. I only did one restoration of a Model T fire engine once. It is in my projects if you care to look. It was alot of fun but nothing as nice as the stuff you do. Thanks for posting.

God Bless
tom

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 4309 days


#6 posted 02-08-2010 05:38 AM

Very nice.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 3698 days


#7 posted 03-09-2012 12:34 PM

Very Nice! I wonder if it would be acceptable to build, register and drive a wooden car today.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 3786 days


#8 posted 03-09-2012 12:40 PM

Great work, love it..
Mike, they’re still building the Morgan in England, lots of wood in those
sports cars.

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View derosa's profile

derosa

1597 posts in 3841 days


#9 posted 03-09-2012 12:50 PM

NY has a very liberal policy on building your own car. It has to have the required lights, seatbelts and can stop in a safe distance; everything else including materials is fairly open.

-- A posse ad esse

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 3698 days


#10 posted 03-09-2012 12:52 PM

Yes Glen I know about the Morgan, a ten year waiting list last time I researched it. My question really is could “we” as wood workers build our own legal to drive wooden car?
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 3698 days


#11 posted 03-09-2012 01:00 PM

Back in the early part of the last century a former neighbor of mine, and my mentor, told the story to me that in his father’s blacksmith’s shop they used to build beer trucks out of oak and ash. You know, the old “C” cabs with chain drive. I would love to do something like that with a more modern running gear. My mentor’s father was the last blacksmith in Niagara Falls a man of many skills passed down to his son and some from his son to me.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 3786 days


#12 posted 03-09-2012 01:21 PM

Mike I think you probably could do it, but I’d REALY want to have a deep conversation with the
motor vehicle branch types before going anywhere with it.
In B.C. they can be quite forgiving on the “homebuilt” type, then turn arround and fail a restoration,
and yet alow a quasi street legal race car to be liscenced.
I’m aware of a certain Chev Vega with 496 inch NOS motor that was liscenced by simply taking in the orriginal registration..no inspection required..But having said that, when last seen the only “violation” was the winshield wipers hadn’t been reinstalled after painting.

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View Ken Reed's profile

Ken Reed

158 posts in 4190 days


#13 posted 03-09-2012 01:35 PM

When mtenterprises mentions building a wooden car I’m a bit confused by just what you mean. The Morgans and essentially any pre-1930 car has wooden framing for the bodywork, but wood was abandoned for the actual main frame that holds the drive train very early on, say 1920 or before. This hybrid approach means that you have a wood frame and a steel chassis. However there were many wooden bodied cars. The “woodies” of the 30’s and 40’s mainly were favored as estate wagons and sedans and later by surfers. They were framed in heavy timber, usually ash but maple was used as well as other woods, then panels were fit into the spaces. My favorite were the skiff-bodied cars from Europe made mostly in the 20’s and fitted by famous boat and airplane constructors such as Labourdette and Nieuport. Perhaps the most famous is the H6C Hispano-Suiza bodied in copper riveted “Tulipwood”.

As far as modern cars go, several have tried older classic designs, but here’s a great modern car done entirely in wood, including the wheels! The body is made by weaving veneers, sort of like the pressed salad bowls you’ve seen.

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 3698 days


#14 posted 03-09-2012 07:48 PM

Now those are a bit beyond my skills but very cool.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View Ken Reed's profile

Ken Reed

158 posts in 4190 days


#15 posted 03-10-2012 12:33 AM

Beyond me too, but inspirational!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com