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Resaving a Oak on a Rikon Model 10-324TG

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Blog entry by nutmegger13 posted 11-25-2020 09:56 PM 576 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Looking for some advise….
I have a 2 inch thick black oak slab. It is 22 inches wide. It is 40 inches long. I am making a table top, 3/4 inch thick. It has to be 30 inches wide. I was planning on resawing the board on my Rikon 14 inch bandsaw into 2 one inch thick boards and planing them down to 3/4 inch. My dilemma, is do I cut the 22 inch wide board in half yielding 2 pieces 10 inches wide for resawing? Or should I cut the board into 3, 7 inch boards for resawing? I don’t know how difficult it would be to resaw a 10 inch wide board on my 14 inch bandsaw. If I cut it into smaller boards, I have more side to side gluing up to get to 30 inches. I just bought a Woodslicer 3 TPI resawing blade. Also, should I use the fence or the resawing bar for doing this? Any advise would be appreciated..

Thank you..

-- nutmegger13, Connecticut



6 comments so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

6390 posts in 1558 days


#1 posted 11-25-2020 10:04 PM

Whether you go with two or three boards is up to you. 7” will be easier to resaw than 10”.

Regarding the bar, if your saw is properly tuned then you only need the fence. If it’s not, scribe a line and use the bar. Be sure to keep the board flat against either so you get pieces with parallel faces.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#2 posted 11-25-2020 11:13 PM

As Rich said, if your saw is lucky enough to have zero drift then you won’t need the board. If the saw is tuned well then 10” should be no problem but 7 should be easier to handle.

The bandsaw in my estimation is the hardest tool in the shop to tune so don’t get discouraged if it takes a lot of dialing in to get it right. Have you watched the Alex Snodgrass video?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View mitch_56's profile

mitch_56

52 posts in 1441 days


#3 posted 11-26-2020 02:32 PM

Good options above, I’ll offer a different one just for variety:

22” wide stock is pretty expensive these days, and a 30” bookmatched table top is an impressive sight to see.
Consider taking it to a mill that has a bandsaw with the capacity to re-saw a 22” wide board. It’ll cost an hour or two of shop time, which won’t be a fortune, and you’ll get a very unique result.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6310 posts in 2356 days


#4 posted 11-26-2020 03:43 PM

The Highland Woodworking Woodslicer is an excellent resaw blade and will yield great results as long as it is still sharp AND clean. It seems to dull a little more quickly than other blades I have used but while sharp gives some of the cleanest cuts. If you have never resawn anything that wide, you might not want something you have one shot at as your first attempt but as long as the saw is up to it and you take your time and don’t try to force it through, the blade will handle the 10” cut. I have personally had better luck using a fence than a bar but I would practice on something else first to see which method works better for you and your saw.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View nutmegger13's profile

nutmegger13

21 posts in 1232 days


#5 posted 11-27-2020 10:37 AM

Thanks for the input. The guy who sold me the slab of black oak, offered to mill it as Mitch suggested. My planer cannot handle something that wide however.. I was going to bookmatch the pieces I milled whether 7 or 10 inches. I think that would be a nice touch..

-- nutmegger13, Connecticut

View Bstrom's profile

Bstrom

258 posts in 141 days


#6 posted 11-27-2020 06:34 PM



The Highland Woodworking Woodslicer is an excellent resaw blade and will yield great results as long as it is still sharp AND clean. It seems to dull a little more quickly than other blades I have used but while sharp gives some of the cleanest cuts. If you have never resawn anything that wide, you might not want something you have one shot at as your first attempt but as long as the saw is up to it and you take your time and don t try to force it through, the blade will handle the 10” cut. I have personally had better luck using a fence than a bar but I would practice on something else first to see which method works better for you and your saw.

- Lazyman


I used a Wood Slicer before converting to a 12” riser setup and went with the Timberwolf 3tpi blade. It is also an excellent choice. Sawed a full 12” plank with difficulty but a 10” was fairly easy. Rip to smaller pieces if your plank has twists or cups.

-- Bstrom

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