LumberJocks

mnorusis's Favorites

  • Advertise with us
View WayneC's profile

Handplane Reference #3: Handplane Related Videos

04-02-2007 12:46 AM by WayneC | 4 comments »

This is a collection of handplane related videos. This is intended primarily as a personal reference, but feel free to suggest additions and comment on the content: I own the following videos/DVDs: RECLAIMING FLEA MARKET PLANES VIDEO WITH ERNIE CONOVER – Excellent vide on how to restore old handplanes. Sharpening Woodworking Tools with Leonard Lee – good video on sharpening Hand Tool Techniques Part 1: Plane Sharpening by David Charlesworth – If your interested ...

Read this entry »


View Mike Lingenfelter's profile

Jigs and Fixtures #1: Planer Sled

05-22-2008 02:39 AM by Mike Lingenfelter | 21 comments »

As part of my workbench project I needed to mill up a somewhat large piece of lumber for the main chop on my face vise. It was larger than my 6” Jointer could handle. I needed to find an easy way to mill the 2 large faces. I have been wanting to make a Planer Sled for awhile now, so that’s what I did. I based mine on one Keith Rust did for Fine Woodworking “Flatten Boards without a Jointer”. This article is available at finewoodworking.com, but it is only available if you have a ...

Read this entry »


View Andy's profile

"Art Box" Tutorial #4: Corner Splines

06-23-2009 08:18 PM by Andy | 26 comments »

Updated 1/15/12 We now have our box assembled and glued up. Depending on the temperature, let it dry for a couple of hours, or overnight to be safe.Take the tape off and clean up any dried glue. This is a good time to smooth up the bottom to get rid of any rocking.You can double stick sandpaper onto a very flat and firm surface and slide the bottom across that. The problem with this approach is that sheet sandpaper is way too small. You can stick down several sheets and if you go very s...

Read this entry »


View GaryK's profile

Making a simple inlay

05-19-2008 10:03 PM by GaryK | 21 comments »

Here’s the technique I used to make the inlay in the TV Stand that I recently posted..First you need to make a little jig like you would for finger/box joints...Then make a cut and then move the cut you just made over the piece of wood on your jig. ..Then flip it over, center it between two cuts and do it again..Then you glue in small pieces of wood into the cuts and then bandsaw cut off the inlays...Here you can see two different inlay woods. It all depends on the effect you are goi...

Read this entry »


View John Fry's profile

A small table that took a whole lot of work

04-10-2008 06:20 AM by John Fry | 40 comments »

This is my first blog entry ever. :-) So I hope I do it right. This is a photo essay of the construction of a couple of “Drum Tables”. A drum table made of Indonesian rosewood and wenge. A second table of Asian ebony and wenge was made at the same time. They have a 21” diameter at the top, and stand 23” tall. The main cylinder has an 18” outside diameter. The curved side panels are all bent laminations, and veneered with the final wood choice. The curve...

Read this entry »


View Kerux's profile

Swirl Inlay Using Table Saw Jig

04-15-2008 12:22 AM by Kerux | 23 comments »

Here is a tutorial on the “Swirl” inlay that I use, but with a twist, this time I made a little jig for the table saw. As you can see it is a small simple sled. I then took the sled and marked a line of what I thought would be a good angle for most pen blanks. I don’t know what the exact angle is… I just eye balled it. It is more than 45 degree’s of that I’m sure of. I measure up the blank as seen here so that a little less than half the blank ...

Read this entry »


View Porosky's profile

Drunken Cutting Boards #2: Smooth Flowing Drunken Checker board

09-21-2009 03:49 AM by Porosky | 15 comments »

So having read part #1 I’ll complete the second variation of the Drunken checker board pattern. The process is basically the same except for one critical part and is as follows. Start again by taping two blanks together. This time In stead of making opposing S cuts I’ll follow the S pattern with each cut. (I get a little sloppy, but it works out OK). Follow the Part #1 procedure. CRITICAL PART! This step creates the difference between the pattern in part one ...

Read this entry »



DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com