LumberJocks

WIP: Shop Project #2: The Journey Continues

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by mawilsonWCR posted 04-30-2021 11:46 PM 365 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The Journey Begins Part 2 of WIP: Shop Project series Part 3: We have Doors »

The materials and installation crew showed up early on the 21st. Work begins:

First day was short. The wind picked up making it difficult to apply the insulation.

Day two was also cut short by the weather. Things improved on day three though one of the installers pulled a back muscle making for a third short day. Three walls up and one of three roof panels.

Day four, after a weekend, saw the basic building done:

The trailer moved into its new home today.

The roll up doors are due next week.

I’ve been debating floor covering. Epoxy seems like a good idea. Having it done in this area is ~$6/sf which would be ~$4800 for the 800sf shop area. DIY would be much less, but more labor on my part. Then there’s durability. Or I could go with a sealer instead. Regardless of what I do, I’d like to get the floor done before adding a bunch of large power tools.

-- No trees were harmed while sending this message; however, a rather large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.



7 comments so far

View HowardAppel's profile

HowardAppel

75 posts in 4115 days


#1 posted 05-01-2021 12:03 AM

Have you thought about a wood floor? Even at today’s high prices you could probably put down a decent plywood for less than the epoxy and it would probably be more comfortable for your back and knees. And any money saved by putting down plywood you could buy some of those rubber pads or MOAR TOOLS.

View darthford's profile

darthford

703 posts in 3005 days


#2 posted 05-01-2021 12:12 AM

Looking great so far. How tall is that door?


Have you thought about a wood floor? Even at today s high prices you could probably put down a decent plywood for less than the epoxy and it would probably be more comfortable for your back and knees. And any money saved by putting down plywood you could buy some of those rubber pads or MOAR TOOLS.

- HowardAppel

That got me thinking about the snap in engineered flooring vs epoxy. I looked into epoxy coatings last week but found a LOT of complaints about it peeling up by people who swore they followed the directions to the letter.

View mawilsonWCR's profile

mawilsonWCR

31 posts in 82 days


#3 posted 05-01-2021 02:04 AM


Have you thought about a wood floor?
I’ve thought about it. I’m already suffering from sticker shock related to putting wood on the walls. I guess it’s not beyond possibility. Looks like 25 sheets of 3/4” plywood plus 640 linear feet of (I’m guessing) 1x furring is still less than hiring out epoxy.

How tall is that door?
10’x10 roll up once it’s installed. Two, one on the North, one on the South, for airflow. The shop will also double as a place for my motorcycle and truck to hang out during hurricanes.

That got me thinking about the snap in engineered flooring vs epoxy.
Humidity in Florida is an issue. Floating a floor outside an air-conditioned area is problematic. I’m not sure sealing the concrete would be sufficient vapor barrier.

I looked into epoxy coatings last week but found a LOT of complaints about it peeling up by people who swore they followed the directions to the letter.
Yeah. I’ve seen the same complaints which adds to my concerns for doing a DIY epoxy coating.

-- No trees were harmed while sending this message; however, a rather large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

View HowardAppel's profile

HowardAppel

75 posts in 4115 days


#4 posted 05-01-2021 03:31 AM

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

550 posts in 4828 days


#5 posted 05-01-2021 03:54 PM

I would like to learn more about the wall and rafter assembly. Are the vertical uprights and roof pieces assembled on the ground then set into place as a single component? In the first picture that’s what it looks like. It also looks like there are stubs connected to a base plate along the edge of the slab. Are the assembled components just slipped into, or over, those stubs? How are the stubs attached to the base plate? Is the exterior panels or siding?

-- NorthWoodsMan

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3647 posts in 4794 days


#6 posted 05-02-2021 05:13 AM

Howard,

I took a look at your link and had to chuckle, wondering how pine becomes hardwood. ??? Kind of makes me wonder if their copywriter knows anything about wood.

L/W

-- “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” Benjamin Franklin -- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View mawilsonWCR's profile

mawilsonWCR

31 posts in 82 days


#7 posted 05-02-2021 05:45 AM


I would like to learn more about the wall and rafter assembly. Are the vertical uprights and roof pieces assembled on the ground then set into place as a single component? In the first picture that s what it looks like. It also looks like there are stubs connected to a base plate along the edge of the slab. Are the assembled components just slipped into, or over, those stubs? How are the stubs attached to the base plate? Is the exterior panels or siding?

- northwoodsman

The uprights and rafter assemblies were put together on the ground similar to bents for timber frames. The rafter assemblies have 12” sections of slightly smaller rectangular tube welded on that inserts into the uprights then screwed together on three sides. The sole tube likewise has smaller rectangular tube inserts welded on 4’ centers. The “bents” are sleeved over the inserts and screwed on three sides. Ultimately top and bottom are screwed on all four sides once the siding is applied. The siding is made up from ~3’ wide 20’ long panels. The faux lap siding look is an option. The structure is rated for 160mph winds. I’d guess there’s more than 1000 screws holding the building together.

-- No trees were harmed while sending this message; however, a rather large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com