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Festool stuff #5: Bench dogs for the 20mm holes - reviews, 3d printed, upgrade and ramblings.

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Blog entry by mafe posted 12-14-2019 03:56 PM 1909 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Bench dogs for the 20mm holes
reviews, 3d printed, upgrade and ramblings.

I bought some new dogs for my worktable a few weeks back, some 3D printed plastic and some in precision made aluminium and wanted to make a short review and share some thoughts on this.
Nope it was not Chihuahua…
Wrrooouuuffff!
The plastic version was mainly bought to use for fixture of jigs and other stuff to the table and because I was curious to see them. ;-)


Here they are.
Green 3D printed plastic dogs, from a seller called Yumiland on E-bay UK, price 20GBP for all of them, including the low spacers.
Aluminium dogs and extenders, from the Danish tool company https://www.dorchdanola.dk , 44GBP for 4 low dogs, two extenders and two FS track washers that converts the extenders into guide rail dogs.
All dogs are threaded with M8.


Just a closer look, to see the quality.
I screwed the extenders on top of the aluminium dogs here, they can be screwed under also or you can put the nuts you see in the plastic bag and use them to lock a FS track saw track or a Festool fence to the table, for fast and easy removal.
The black dog on the left is one from a workmate type table and the one on right Festools original dogs.


Close-up of a 3D printed dog, quite amazing what can be made today on a printer!


Here some of my early home made fixtures.
20mm aluminium rod with a rubber top.
Jig holder, with plasterboard fixture that goes through the holes.
The most simple one, bolt, washer and wing nut.
The problem with the holds, was they were not centred up with the holes, when I needed that, otherwise they are more than enough.


I’m impressed that you can 3D print this stuff, but not impressed that there were an edge on the top, this made the things you put up against it off centre… Grrrrr, why did they not just do like on the bottom made a little rounding, so the edge would not be a problem…


Ok, it can be fixed easy, just a short piece of 8M rod in the drill press.


A washer and the dog.
Spin it and with sandpaper or a file remove the edge and round it a little.


Like this.


Now we only have the small lines on the sides that stick out a wee, these also have to be filed off, to make sure the dog are flat to the work piece.
Also the part that goes into the bench, otherwise you risk making damage to the holes in the MDF when pulling them out.
So yes a wonderful value for money, but not ready out of the box – I still think the price are so fair, that spending 20 minutes fixing them are well worth it, so I can recommend these.


Here the aluminium dogs, I’m pleased with the quality.
The flat side on the dogs will help you not make marks in the things you put against them, but they can also be the opper side if you bang into the sharp corner… so a matter of taste – with this type you need to make sure they are flat against the workpiece, when using flat side.
The extender can be used in many ways.
(I have a feeling the dogs are a tiny bit too small since they moves almost too easy in the holes… but it’s so little that it’s almost nothing).


I found a big washer and a M8 finger bolt to match, so I could tighten them down.


This can also be used on the plastic dogs.


Sawing with dogs.
Put the wood on the table against the dogs – a dog with extender on top and one further up the table.


Now the track can be put against the extenders.


Now you will have a perfect 90° cut.
This is fast and functional if you don’t have the track mounted on the table or 45° cuts where you position the back extender in the 45° line of the holes.


I quickly found some bigger finger screws, the small were a pain in the some where dark.

That’s it, no more ramblings about dogs, big smile.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, wrrrouuuffff.

Best thoughts,

MaFe

———————————————

bench dogs, festool bench dogs, rail dogs, mft3 dogs, festool dogs, festool, mft3

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



12 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

12933 posts in 4361 days


#1 posted 12-14-2019 05:59 PM

Those look really nice!

I have watched the kids at school (where I used to teach and still substitute) make things with the 3-D printers. It is amazing- especially with the imaginations of teenagers!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Brit's profile

Brit

7889 posts in 3448 days


#2 posted 12-14-2019 06:29 PM

Excellent addition Mads. Do they come in pink? LOL.

-- Andy - Old Chinese proverb says: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it."

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3423 posts in 1426 days


#3 posted 12-15-2019 02:21 AM

Love the whole Fe$tool MFT concept with dogs. Love that fact that you are prepared to track saw across your tabletop.
NO idea how you made it but by the look of it, it may need a new transplant. I made my first one with a ruler, tape measure, a set square, hole punch, 20mm TCT forstner bit, drill press and free hand drilling for out of drill press reach holes. With that method, there would be no way I’d have faith in an accurate 90° using dogs only.

I used the Parf Guide Sytem (that has now been improved by the new Parf Mk II Guide System),

to build a MFT clone(s) for myself and friends… I have made over 1/2 doz. of them and from table recipients, I have recovered cost from generous friendly donations. Helluva more reliable than my initial attempt.

I have a 3D printer, however, have shied away from making dogs due to tolerance reliability. You need to take care when filling,

as wrong pressure may (repeat may) disproportion two diameters… probably a fools excuse but as we strive for 101% accuracy, all has to be considered.

I have a swag of stainless dogs

which are nowhere as tool friendly as plastic and aluminium… I have blades/chissels to prove it.

While on the topic of dogs, have you/viewers been exposed to the Super dog?

they are great for that flush dog… seated by a twist of the knob… does need a chamfer on the dog hole but the displayed tool or a large countersink.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View mafe's profile

mafe

12305 posts in 3695 days


#4 posted 12-17-2019 07:36 PM

Hi,

Lew, yes I have to admit also it fascinates me also, a lot, if I had a real project for it, I would buy a printer and start playing, but I can’t really find any reason and see so many just printing stuff, I feel it’s expensive for just some plastic stuff I don’t need. But positively jealous and get the feeling of a child in a toy store, when I see them.
Smiles.

Brit, ha ha ha, yes that’s just my color. Laugh. The printet versions will come in hand……..perhaps, for now they are just fun and the metal once has already been in use and are really cool.
Hmmmmm perhaps I should go and paint them pink………………………………………………….naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.

LittleBlackDuck, what a collection you have there!
I did not make my top, it was the one that came with the MFT3 table, I saw in all directions on it as you can see, I’m actually amazed I had it app 10 years now, so perhaps I should turn it soon… I did put a planning stop in it, but never use it after I got my big workbench.

I have been looking at one of these, it’s precision made stainless, like this you can make half a table in one go and don’t get the repetitive mis position factor. It’s just over 100 usd. Then I can make as many tops and other variations as I want.
Cool hole system you have there.
The Superdogs looks real yummy don’t think we have a local dealer.
Yes I’m aware the filling could result in lost precision, I was only filling of the top and the extra plastic, so no danger. On a cut of 70 cm, the 1/10 mm that it can maximum be, will not add op to something that can be seen.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3423 posts in 1426 days


#5 posted 12-18-2019 12:54 AM



.... I feel it s expensive for just some plastic stuff I don t need.

LittleBlackDuck,

I have been looking at one of these, it s precision made stainless, like this you can make half a table in one go and don t get the repetitive mis position factor. It s just over 100 usd.
- mafe


Two thing mafe,

  1. Open up your creative juices… you would be surprised at what you can 3D print (outside the workshop). Most stuff I print is small (135mm x 135mm bed) and the printers nowdays are not super shekels… also if you are engineering minded, they can be fabricated for virtually bugger all… many internet feeds to walk you through.
  2. That stainless looks cool, however, how do you drill the holes… If it’s “hand” feed of a forstner bit, misaligned bits can become expensive replacement. Whatever system is adopted, if you send out feelers amongst your local woodie buddies (and maybe combine that with any “men’s shed” clubs in the area) you could amortise the cost of that “one of use” jig to pennies.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View mafe's profile

mafe

12305 posts in 3695 days


#6 posted 12-18-2019 07:22 PM

Yes it could be fun 3D printing some stuff.
The stainless thingy has 30mm holes. So it’s used with a 30mm copy ring and 20mm spiral bit in the router. Quite clever idea.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3423 posts in 1426 days


#7 posted 12-18-2019 09:55 PM


Yes it could be fun 3D printing some stuff.
The stainless thingy has 30mm holes. So it s used with a 30mm copy ring and 20mm spiral bit in the router. Quite clever idea.
- mafe

Just in case you were one of the few thousand+ LJ members that missed my 3D post, being near Christmas, here’s a collection of 3D printed Stocking Fillers (lots of pictures, easier to view downloaded).

Now I do like the concept of that stainless thingy as you described. The copy ring would fit snug and if you used a 20mm (or 3/4” for you tragic USA misguided wretches) router bit, plunging would give a good toleranced hole and you wouldn’t have to face that crappy forstner bit bottom out or delaminating ply which stops the plunge.
Downside $100 (US$) to buy and with the weight (and size) of stainless, probably $500 (US$) to ship to Australia…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View mafe's profile

mafe

12305 posts in 3695 days


#8 posted 12-28-2019 12:55 AM

Hmmmmm I can’t make the link work…
Just looked at some of your 3D – amazing.
Yes I think the shipping will make it stupid…
Perhaps you can find a lazer guy there, who can cut you one…

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3423 posts in 1426 days


#9 posted 12-28-2019 07:55 AM



Hmmmmm I can t make the link work…

Perhaps you can find a lazer guy there, who can cut you one…
- mafe

  1. Which link… Hope it’s not the missing one the missus accuses me off.
  2. No need for another item that makes me contemplate which tool I should use. My redundancy bin is bloody redundant.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View mafe's profile

mafe

12305 posts in 3695 days


#10 posted 12-28-2019 04:51 PM

Yes the missing link, it’s exactly what I mean, found it, this morning, in the mirror, if I had only looked before…, well if I had, I might have never left the house, from now I will just stay in the workshop, curtains down and dimmed lights. My ohhh, just realizing my GF should have a medal or a guide dog, well perhaps this is why, she insist on the lights off…

Happy new year.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10861 posts in 4658 days


#11 posted 01-08-2020 08:23 PM

Mads,

COOL work…

Question: Why weren’t the 3D Printed dogs designed with the threaded holes so they would not have to be drilled?
Using Fusion 360, the threads could have been included in the 3D model.

Interesting approach…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/index.php?media/albums/users/joe-lyddon.1389/

View mafe's profile

mafe

12305 posts in 3695 days


#12 posted 01-09-2020 10:02 PM

Hi Joe.
Thanks.
The dos were designed ad delivered with a threaded hole. I just cleaned up the outside. I used that thread to hold them in the drill press.
Smiles.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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