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Blacksmithing from a woodworkers perspective #11: Hold fast - two types - one also for woodworking.

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Blog entry by mafe posted 05-27-2019 11:57 AM 688 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: Hardy tools DIY - tools for bending and making shoulders Part 11 of Blacksmithing from a woodworkers perspective series Part 12: Blacksmiths basics - you don’t need a lot. »

Hold fast – two types
one also for woodworking.

Once you start banging some metal, to make your own woodworking tools, you quickly realize, that often, two hands are not enough…
So time to make hold fasts, here I’ll make two types.


First we have a quick and dirty spring loaded version.
Just a bend piece of flat bar, with a hole drilled into it and a eye bolt and nut on each side.
(The spring was just a long one from the trash, think it was from a lamp).


Here on the anvil, going through the hardy hole (square hole on top) and down to where it has a spring to it.


I simply put it on my band, no reason to make it complexed, you can just put a screw.


Here from the top.
As you can see one side is open and one side have a hold, this makes different types of hold possible.
You simply put your finger in the eye and lift.


Now in use, making the next hold fast…


Now I have two hands free for tools.


Detail.


Let’s make another hold fast…


To begin with I actually just used a old bricklayer fold fast, but it came out too easy.


So a piece of car coil spring steel were straightened out.


And shaped into a curve with a food, this is a classic hold fast.
Here almost done, just needed a little more shaping.


And now in use.
It’s a simple tool, you knock on the top to make ti hold and on side or under to loosen it.


One end is shaped into a foot.


So it can hold the item tight down.


The underside of the foot got a grip surface, I made that with a Dremmel tool.


That’s it, easy peasy…
And it can be used for wood working as well, just remember the hole you use it in needs to be a bit larger, than the hold fast, for it to lock in place. I will use mine on my shaving horse workbench also.


It got it’s own place on the anvil stand.


Ready for making new tools.


Don’t do this at home…
I actually tried to harden it, but the steel got too stiff in my taste, but if we don’t try, we don’t win, now I’ll try to heat it up to light blue and see if I can find that magic spring point.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or to hold on perhaps…

Best thoughts,

MaFe

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



5 comments so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

19201 posts in 2952 days


#1 posted 05-27-2019 12:26 PM

You’ve made yourself a nice setup Mads.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22652 posts in 3490 days


#2 posted 05-27-2019 01:23 PM

Very ingenious. I just love your anvil stand and how i tis outfitted with all the needed tools right close by.

Cheer, my friend!..............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View lew's profile

lew

12761 posts in 4140 days


#3 posted 05-27-2019 02:27 PM

Thanks for the ideas, Mads!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10600 posts in 4437 days


#4 posted 05-29-2019 04:53 AM

Very interesting… I didn’t know that…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View mafe's profile

mafe

12040 posts in 3474 days


#5 posted 05-30-2019 03:11 PM

Hi,
Don, thank you, I like it, it’s not too big and fit into the woodshop.
Jim, smile, only problem is that tools have a tendency to grow… like wild flowers… Laugh.
lew, thanks.
Joe, we learn new every day. ;-)
Thank you for the comments.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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