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Folding frame saw #2: Folding frame / buck saw - hiking version part II.

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Blog entry by mafe posted 01-04-2019 11:24 PM 1620 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Folding frame / buck saw
hiking version.

Press here for part three: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/129193

So let’s get on with the build, last time we looked at an antique carpenters folding frame saw, which was the inspiration for me to do this project – in this part of the blog, I’ll walk you through my own build.


To make some understanding, we start here.
This is the saw I will be making, a foldable frame saw for my hikes.
I went for a fixed blade and string for the tensioning, so I could keep the weight down.


Pictures are from a hammock hike with two of my friends, Claus and Torben, Torben had brought a big lumberjack saw, so we could compare them in use.


Torben sawing away.


Back in the work shop, wood is cut to usable length and dimensions.
Just feeling my way as I go, no fixed plans.
Chose the shorter of the Bahco blades (The fish – Swedish), since I wanted a saw that was not to heavy for hiking.


A zoom in.


I minimized the dimensions as much as I had the guts to do, while still believing it would end up rigid and cut to length for the two handles.


Marking the center of the wood, with a cutting gauge.


Making a deep marking, so I can use it as guide for sawing the rabbet later.


Time to find out how and where the blade should be mounted.
It was important to get it right, so it could pivot into the handle later.
Later in the blog, I’ll work a little on the blade, but as little as possible.


Drilling holes for the blade to be mounted in.


Then opening the kerf / rabbet for the blade to pivot in.
Yes of course I used a frame saw for this. ;-)


Opening the kerf down the side of the handle.


Adjusting the width, with the Bahco blade.


Used a drill bit to pull the saw blade.


After plenty of fiddling with the blade getting stuck, due to the tooth set, I decided to run it through the table saw…
Hmmmmmmm, should have done that from the start. :-o Learning by doing.


Here is the concept.
The two handles are holding the blade and can rotate around it, to become a protector.


Folded up, so the blade is inside the handles.
Now I could find the final length of the handles also.


Time to cut the cross bar to final length.
Marking up for the tenon.
The tenons are only guiding, so they don’t need to be too deep, I choose to let them stop just before the blade rabbet.


Using a square to find the correct length and mark the tenons precise.


Marking the mortises on the handles.


Cutting the tenon shoulders of the cross bar.
The small block a test cut.


Then I set up my tenon jig, to cut the tenons.
Again making test cuts first.


Finally cutting them into the cross bar.


Tenon!


Cleaning up, with the lovely 311.
I love that plane!


Now where I have the final dimensions, I can mark the mortises sides up.


Cutting the mortises with a chisel.


Japanese chisel – not that it makes a difference, since I did not talk to it… ;-)


Testing the depth of the mortise.


Tadaaaaa!


Cleaning up with an English chisel. :-D


Fist assembly, and wauuuuuuu it fits!


Just for the smile.


Here this part of the blog ends, with a functional sav.

See you soon…

I think the English call it a frame saw and the Americans a buck saw…
Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bow_saw
Frame saw / rammesav, names and meanings in Danish: https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armsav

Press here for part three: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/129193

Hope it can be to some inspiration, perhaps even to make one.

Best thoughts,

MaFe

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



14 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

12840 posts in 4233 days


#1 posted 01-04-2019 11:33 PM

Thanks for the “ride along”, Mads!

I really like the addition of the leather hand hold wrap. That’ll save some blisters!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Druid's profile

Druid

2137 posts in 3273 days


#2 posted 01-05-2019 12:51 AM

Interesting project Mads. Looks good. Thanks for sharing.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4112 posts in 1060 days


#3 posted 01-05-2019 02:04 AM

That’s a nice simple frame saw, Mads. Looks quite good for hiking.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

23188 posts in 3583 days


#4 posted 01-05-2019 04:12 AM

Great tour of your project, Mads!!

Cheers, my friend…................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View stefang's profile

stefang

16712 posts in 3812 days


#5 posted 01-05-2019 04:12 PM

I have a cheap metal framed bow saw with a Swedish blade like yours. We call it a ‘gjerdesag’ here. Cuts really quick and easy. Add to that the portability factor of your fold-up model and you might be coming home with a lot of tree limbs in the future. Happy New Year Mads, glad to see some posts from you, keep up the good work!!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View icemanhank's profile

icemanhank

506 posts in 2634 days


#6 posted 01-05-2019 11:33 PM

Lovely mate

-- "These are my principles. And if you don't like them, I have others." ... Cheers, David from Sydney Australia

View swirt's profile

swirt

4140 posts in 3450 days


#7 posted 01-06-2019 03:46 AM

Nice build Mafe. That should prove to be a very handy saw.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1307 posts in 2191 days


#8 posted 01-06-2019 10:01 PM

Good to see the making of this saw. Looking forward to next chapter!
Nu har vi venindesave!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View mafe's profile

mafe

12096 posts in 3567 days


#9 posted 01-16-2019 11:34 AM

Hy guys,
Ty, ja nu har vi veninde save, så din i dit sommerhus, skøn sag, køn sag. ;-) Herligt, tak.
Swirt, thanks, it already did on several hikes, a joy for hand and eye, for me.
icemanhank, smiles.
stefang, gjerdesag, tak jeg lærer nyt hver dag. Happy new yer dear Mike, happy to see you are up and running.
Jim, Cheers, happy to have you along. ;-)
Dave Polaschek, I enjoy to be able to put it in my belt while walking.
Druid, thanks, good to see your face.
Lew, yes the blisters… it seems to work good with the leather. Smiles.
Best thoughts and thanks for the comments,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

12096 posts in 3567 days


#10 posted 01-16-2019 11:50 AM

Gengaskokaren, Nice!
I have the modern variant of the same blade but with a metal bow instead. Or actually three of them. But that one demands a lot of space when traveling. I will copy your design and build myself a rammesav or spännsåg which is the Swedish name of the same saw.
Good to see you back in business again.
- Hi, yes we can’t have too many… ;-D Look forward to see your version. Thanks.

Brit, Always nice to see your tools working some wood. Saws are fun to make aren’t they?
BTW,
I talk to my chisels Mads and they talk to me. :o)
- Laugh I also talk to mine and yes they do talk back… Words of kindness, especially the old once. Yes saws are fun making. Smiles my friend.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

12096 posts in 3567 days


#11 posted 01-16-2019 12:04 PM

I can see the link to next page is gone…
There must be a LJ burn down, so go here: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/129193 for part three.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Gengaskokaren's profile

Gengaskokaren

33 posts in 3634 days


#12 posted 01-20-2019 08:22 PM

Hmm, something weird happened with two posts of the same content. I copy my comment from the other post below.

Nice!
I have the modern variant of the same blade but with a metal bow instead. Or actually three of them. But that one demands a lot of space when traveling. I will copy your design and build myself a rammesav or spännsåg which is the Swedish name of the same saw.
Good to see you back in business again.

View Gengaskokaren's profile

Gengaskokaren

33 posts in 3634 days


#13 posted 01-20-2019 08:32 PM

It will take a while before I start with my own version of the spännsåg.
Right now I’m building a stool in ash that can be used in the shower, I sometimes have hip problems and want to sit down instead of standing on a hard floor, and making a folding mushroom knife for my wife and also trying to get a nice piece out of a burl of birch, so far it looks like a snake or maybe a murena. So I have promised myself to at least finish one of those before I start something else.

View mafe's profile

mafe

12096 posts in 3567 days


#14 posted 02-10-2019 11:41 AM

Gengaskokaren, yes strange things happened…
Sounds like a good project a shower stool, I once sat in a wheel chair for six months, after a car crash, here I loved the shower stool, that the kommune here provided, but it was ugly as hell. ;-D
My girlfriend carry every day in her bag a mushroom knife I have made her. :-)
Spännsåg på Dansk kalder vi dem rammesave.
Best thoughts and happy building,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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