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Trying new tools #2: Thin Kerf Blade Stabilizer

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Blog entry by jamsomito posted 05-20-2020 02:44 PM 273 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: japanese pull saw - Suizan Ryoba Folding hand saw Part 2 of Trying new tools series no next part

I had this blade stabilizer handed down to me from someone who didn’t use it. I was warned I wouldn’t be able to utilize my full cutting depth with it on so I just never bothered. My cuts have been fine with thin kerf blades so far so why bother. But, I recently built a jointer sled and I wanted this to be as smooth and true as possible, so I thought I’d give it a whirl. I was only taking thin shavings anyways, so it didn’t matter if it stuck up past the table on the other side of the blade.

Did it work? I have absolutely no idea! haha

My cuts came out fine. There are a few teeth marks on my pieces afterwards, but frankly it looks the same as if I had made a regular resaw or rip without the stabilizer. But this was a big piece and a really thin shaving, so maybe it could have been worse.

One observation was that it actually didn’t come up above the table, which was a nice surprise. My maximum cutting depth is about 2-3/4”, just barely enough for my 2” piece on a plywood sled like you can see in the picture above. I had it raised all the way and it wouldn’t have interfered even with a regular rip cut.

I usually have to use a few spacers from my dado set on regular thin kerf blades because my saw is older and isn’t set up for them. The treads on the arbor don’t go far enough to tighten the nut down on the blade. So I’m thinking I’ll actually keep using this stabilizer moving forward. It’s not getting in the way of anything. It might, maybe, perhaps, in some cases help… maybe. And I can keep all my shims with my dado set then too.

So there ya have it – I’m going to keep using it, but not for the reasons intended.

EDIT: Here’s a couple pics of the finish I got off the blade. Flat, but will need some sanding.



6 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3674 posts in 3085 days


#1 posted 05-20-2020 05:42 PM

I’ve used a stabilizer for at least 15 years and never really thought much of it. Lately, I’ve been trying to get my Sharkguard riving knife set up. The stabilizing disk moves the blade over far enough that the adjustment slot for the riving knife won’t let me line up the knife and the edge of the blade. Last night I thought I’d try to set up the riving knife adjustment block with the stabilizer taken off. I wound up trading one set of problems for another. I finally gave up, took off the adjustment block, put the stabilizer back on and I will make a different set up to hold the Sharkguard. During the process of trying to get things to work, I also realized all of my zero insert plates were cut for the blade with the stabilizer installed. Guess I’ll keep using it. Whether it works or not???

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

543 posts in 1163 days


#2 posted 05-20-2020 05:46 PM

Wait, are you putting it between the blade and the arbor flange? Am I putting it on the wrong side of the blade?

EDIT: ah, I did a quick search and it looks like usually it’s a set of two? Is that correct? I only have one.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3674 posts in 3085 days


#3 posted 05-20-2020 07:53 PM

Mine came as a set.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View AlanWS's profile

AlanWS

48 posts in 4295 days


#4 posted 05-21-2020 04:32 PM

There are two different types of blade stabilizers: one type that is used singly, and pairs used together. The pairs are hollow ground, and the single ones are flat.

-- Alan in Wisconsin

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

543 posts in 1163 days


#5 posted 05-21-2020 04:36 PM

Learn something new every day. Thanks, Alan!

View Andre's profile

Andre

3460 posts in 2543 days


#6 posted 05-21-2020 05:13 PM

Problem with the pairs is they screw up zero clearance inserts and any sleds and jigs.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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