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Wall-mounted Console #7: Turning the corner

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Blog entry by builtinbkyn posted 03-01-2019 03:49 AM 517 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: I've got the power! Part 7 of Wall-mounted Console series Part 8: Finishing the finish? »

After meeting with the tree removal guy and taking care of a few things that were neglected during the outage – LAUNDRY mostly lol, I milled the remaining components. Everything is dry fit and looking almost like a finished product.

Using simple techniques that I’ve seen dozens of times on YT, but usually fail to employ, made things much easier and cleaner. Using a chisel to form a kerf for the saw is one. Such a simple and quick little method ensures a crisp shoulder, but I generally fail to do it, instead using the knife line to start the kerf which sometimes goes well and sometime doesn’t.

Pics of how things go together and some of the work I was able to get done this afternoon.

Tomorrow I’ll pull it apart and start to hand scrape everything, followed by sanding. There’s a scratch that I caused when I failed to tighten one of the screws for the sole plate on the router after centering the bushing when I did the splines. It’s visible in the first pic. A silly brain fart, but I’ll have to work it out.

Before I do that I need to cut the doors to size and mortise in the knife hinges. I’m using touch latches with magnets, so those need to be located while I can still take things apart and locate the screws. Otherwise I’ll be messing around trying to do this when things are already glued and I can’t get a drill inside.

I’m conflicted on how to proceed with the glue-up. I think I’ll give the whole thing a thinned sealer coat of shellac to prevent squeeze out from effecting the finish, and use blue tape to mask off the joint areas during glue-up. These are the stages where I get somewhat lost in the weeds, and it’s probably the most critical for a successful project. Any suggestions are more than welcome :) The finish is something I haven’t tried, but appears to be fool proof – meaning I can’t mess it up – Maloof 2 part finishing system. I picked up the poly oil and the oil wax.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)



14 comments so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

2548 posts in 2135 days


#1 posted 03-01-2019 04:17 AM

On special projects I rub down the glue joints with a paste wax when it is clamped up during glue up dry run, any dry glue just peels off and the paste wax will dissolve with DNA wipe or shellac finish. I use Chapmans wax but pretty sure any neutral one will work fine. That Walnut looks fantastic, beautiful wood for a fine project!
OSMOS oil makes Walnut look very rich and provides a great long tough finish.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2927 posts in 1269 days


#2 posted 03-01-2019 04:25 AM

Andre the wax doesn’t get into the pores of the wood and interfere with the finish? What should the wax not contain for this to work? I have Staples Crystal Clear paste wax. Like I said, this is where I get lost in the weeds lol

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2654 posts in 2677 days


#3 posted 03-01-2019 12:19 PM

Bill – I now have hand tool envy to add to my list of sins.

I use the same approach you mentioned for squeeze out and it works pretty darn well. I’ve always been nervous about trying the wax approach like Andre mentioned, mostly because of all of the horror stories about wax messing up the finish. With my luck I wouldn’t get the wax off the wood and I’d wind up smearing it all over the piece which would mean starting over on the finish.

As Kenny will say – that’s a sexy beast you’re making right there.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Andre's profile

Andre

2548 posts in 2135 days


#4 posted 03-01-2019 02:51 PM

Bill – You and me both as far as finishing goes! I usually do Shellac finish and wax, now starting to use OSMOS and have never had a problem. I use an old batch of Shellac that’s been in the shop for years for the first wipe. Only use this method for inside joints that are hard to get too!, another option is just wipe it a wet/damp rag, much easier and safer if you can access it easily? Only time I have ever had problems with a finish was because of Glue left on the wood, tight joint will have minimal squeeze out? Is that marking knife a shop made one, like the shape.

Haven’t seen Staples brand around here, see it is Carnauba based Chapman’s is Beeswax, not sure it matters?
https://claphams.com/product/beeswax-furniture-polish/

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2927 posts in 1269 days


#5 posted 03-01-2019 03:23 PM

Andre I’ve found wiping with a damp cloth usually just allows the glue to soak into the pores of the wood further. That was my usual method, but I feel it just created more work trying to sand enough to remove those effected areas. Yeah not sure about Carnauba being very good below a finish if I can’t remove all of it. There’s so much on the net about various woodworking methods, but very little on assembly and glue-up which is really a defining factor in the end results. Basically the information on glue-up is confined to gluing up surface components for table tops and benches.

The Osmo oil looks to be similar to the Maloof poly oil finish/oil wax finish, at least in theory :) I don’t know what the formulation for the Maloof finish is. The Osmo finish uses Sunflower oil, Soybean oil, Thissle oil, Carnauba wax, candelilla wax according to the description on Amazon.

The knife was purchased from Japan Woodworker. I like it because the blade is long and thin so it can reach into tight spaces for marking.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8928 posts in 1467 days


#6 posted 03-01-2019 03:57 PM

That’s a sexy beast you’re making right there!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1748 posts in 1341 days


#7 posted 03-01-2019 04:53 PM

I can’t wait to see the finish hit this “sexy beast” and explode, that grain is beautiful. Looking good.

-- Brian Noel

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8928 posts in 1467 days


#8 posted 03-01-2019 04:58 PM

I bet you wish you had a saw like the one in the 3rd pic eh Brian? ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

3433 posts in 1653 days


#9 posted 03-01-2019 11:38 PM

Looking good Bill!

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2927 posts in 1269 days


#10 posted 03-02-2019 03:50 AM

Thanks guys. Sometimes when you think you turned the corner and then you find out you still have a few more to navigate. I dry fitted this a few times and everything seemed fine. Today I decided to clamp it tighter to see what I was really working with. I may make some corner blocks for this for final glue up, but it almost seems unnecessary as it goes together pretty well just clamping across the carcass.

Well anyway the two upper corners were not seating properly. I measured everything and it seems 1/32nd” does really make a difference. The two dividers were just a little too tall. Man I know I measured two, three maybe four times before making any part of this, but hell, better to be too big than too small. A pass on the router table and a few strokes with a chisel and block plane and all is good in Pittsburgh.

Didn’t get much else done other than cutting the doors to length and cabinet scraping the interior faces. I’ll do the exterior faces after assembly. Hopefully I can put this to bed this weekend.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Andre's profile

Andre

2548 posts in 2135 days


#11 posted 03-02-2019 06:41 AM

Ahhhhh, to strife for perfection! Someday I might try that! In the meantime all my work will have Fingerprints:)

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2927 posts in 1269 days


#12 posted 03-02-2019 01:44 PM

LOL Andre there’s very little perfection in what I do in the shop and out. :p I squeezed and prodded it, but it just wasn’t going together the way it should. With that little tweaking I did it now practically falls together, literally. There’s only that long clamp holding it together. Ah still enough time to mess up lol

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View pottz's profile

pottz

4715 posts in 1313 days


#13 posted 03-02-2019 04:23 PM

have confidence bill,you wont mess it up.looking real nice.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2927 posts in 1269 days


#14 posted 03-02-2019 07:59 PM

Thanks Larry. I’m getting a little more confident. I think once I do something a few hundred times, the doubts will fade lol

In the shop and working toward completion. The whole thing pretty much falls together with everything square and tight except one corner that is throwing me for a loop. I’ve checked everything for square, rechecked dimensions, checked for twist in the long boards and even checked wall thickness with calipers, yet I can’t figure out what the issue is. I am 99% sure it will close and not be an issue. It’s all together and looks like it’s glued with no clamps at all. I can even pick it up and move it around. But that damn corner is bugging me. But I’m also not messing with it. I have to learn to leave well enough alone and I will ;)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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