LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'shop made plane'

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Building the Infill Shooting Plane #11: Makin' it pretty

08-06-2016 09:17 PM by JayT | 11 comments »

Most of the body is now shaped, but a couple more areas I like to touch. The corner of the 3/8 base plate is still at a 90 . . . . . . . . so I round it to match the wood body and eliminate a sharp corner. I also round over the top of the escapement area a bit to eliminate that corner, as well. No picture of what it looked like, but these are the areas that get some attention. Now it’s just a matter of sanding everything to whatever level you desire. Don’...

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Building the Infill Shooting Plane #10: Body Work

08-06-2016 08:44 PM by JayT | 2 comments »

With the bottom and side flattened, the next step is to work the mouth and shape the body. Doesn’t matter which you do first, or if you have a short attention span like me, feel free to switch back and forth to break up the monotony. For the blog post, however, we’ll cover one at a time. Finish the mouth With a slim file, work the mouth to even up the metal and wood, smooth the surfaces and adjust the mouth to final dimensions. If the wood overhangs the metal, a sharp chi...

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Building the Infill Shooting Plane #9: Rondo in B Flat

08-01-2016 01:25 AM by JayT | 2 comments »

After letting the epoxy cure for a couple hours, the steel and body are now firmly attached and the machine screws holding the two pieces of steel together can be removed and replaced with slotted brass machine screws. Make sure to use a degreasing cleaner to clean any remaining cutting fluid out of the holes (I use brake cleaner again) and use some kind of thread locker on the machine screws. I use epoxy, tinted to a brass color, just in case one of the screws and the countersunk hole don&...

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Building the Infill Shooting Plane #4: Feeling Froggy

07-21-2016 02:12 AM by JayT | 5 comments »

Here’s where we left off. Mouth opening has been cut and worked to final dimension. Now it’s time to get the frog to fit. A transitional frog has the little bump out on the bottom where the lever cap screw attaches. On an original body, there’s a pocket for that part, we just need to recreate it. Easiest way to mark it out is to first use a small square to mark a line perpendicular to the bed intersecting the line on the face of the bed. This will be the ...

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Building the Infill Shooting Plane #3: Open up and say aaah

07-20-2016 02:07 AM by JayT | 4 comments »

With layout all marked up, it’s time to cut the opening. I did this with a sliding compound miter saw and the plane was designed to make that the best tool to use. If you don’t have a SCMS or are just more comfortable with a table saw and miter gauge or handsaws, no reason not to use them. For a miter saw, set the bevel to 20 degrees and the miter to 45 degrees. Hopefully you have a depth stop. If so, mark the proper distance up from the table on a piece of scrap and do som...

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Building the Infill Shooting Plane #2: Prepare to open your mouth

07-20-2016 12:34 AM by JayT | 0 comments »

With materials in hand, it’s time to start the actual work. First step is to create the mouth, bedding surface for the iron and front escapement area for the shavings. For infill bench planes, the wood can be cut completely apart and held on with the two metal sides during final assembly. Since this shooting plane only has one metal side, that strategy is not a good possibility. With many wooden plane builds, making this opening requires either chiseling out the area or doing a ...

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A Pair of Small Infill Smoothers #1: Let the games begin!

03-05-2015 03:29 AM by Ripthorn | 7 comments »

As some of you may have seen, I built a prototype of a small infill smoother (blog starts here). This went well enough that I decided to make one for myself from precision ground steel. Well, as it turns out, with the way lengths work for precision ground O1, I ended up buying enough for 3 small smoothers and 4 blades, which is perfect, since the prototype needs a blade. So off went my money and a few days later, a package arrived with the steel, some new drill bits, and a scriber. A go...

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