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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'prairie style'

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Prairie Style Mosaics #2: Cut, Glue, Assemble, Repeat

05-27-2018 02:49 PM by EarlS | 5 comments »

Most of the previous entry talked about the process mechanics (cutting, gluing, and clamping). This is a picture of the essential tools for this part of the project: The initial blocks start out with only a few strips of wood with spacers between them and they look pretty rough. However, as the blocks are completed and glued to other blocks, the design starts to come together. Initial strips of bocote and bubinga with walnut spacers. Stacking them together and adding the ka...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #17: All Good things Must End

10-28-2016 01:27 AM by EarlS | 6 comments »

I’m finally finished with the desk. There were a few odds and ends that needed to be wrapped up. I decided to use figure 8 fasteners to hold the top to the base and allow it to move with the seasons. I happened to get my latest copy of Fine Woodworking and there was an article discussing how to properly connect the top and base and why it was important to allow for seasonal movement. A variety of methods were explained. I did learn that the figure 8’s along the front and back need to ...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #16: The Wood Working Blues

10-18-2016 11:59 PM by EarlS | 1 comment »

I’m a huge fan of the Blues. The Blues are my go-to music in the shop. Stax, Chess, MUddy Water, Joe Bonamassa, Beth Hart, Elvin Bishop, Buddy Guy, the list goes on and on. Well, this week I’ve been singing the Woodworking Blues. I’ve been working on the finish for the walnut desk top. Cutting the openings for the cords went well. I made an mdf template that ran the full length of the top with notches removed where the openings needed to be cut. A little dusty, but the end result t...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #15: Drawers

10-13-2016 01:49 AM by EarlS | 3 comments »

There are as many different approaches to drawers as there are woodworkers. The way I see it, a drawer is a box that slides into an opening. The use and type of drawer decide what is needed. In this case, the drawers don’t need to be fancy or complicated. The center drawer is 2” x 12- ½” x 24”, the side drawers 11– ½” wide. The drawer box is ¾” maple to give it a nice clean appearance. A cherry front will match the rest of the desk, and the drawer bottom is ¼” walnut plywood to add a vi...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #14: Breadboard Ends

10-08-2016 03:09 AM by EarlS | 3 comments »

Before I jumped into making the breadboard ends I decided to do some reading and get a little more explanation on wood movement and what role breadboard ends play. Excerpts from Popular WoodWorking magazine website: “Boards expand and contract at a greater rate across their width than they do along the length. How much they expand and contract is more a matter of species and final resting place than anything else. Also, wood tends to expand and contract more actively toward the bark ...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #11: Moving Along

09-09-2016 01:54 AM by EarlS | 3 comments »

Things finally are moving along, unfortunately, a little too fast in the case of the beveled through tenons on the bottom apron and the long stretchers. I forgot to cut the bevels on the tenons BEFORE I cut the arches. As a result I had to come up with plan B. As you can see from the picture, it entails a long fence on the miter bar and a longer piece of sacrificial wood clamped to the miter bar and the stretcher. Probably not the preferred method for cutting bevels on the tenons, b...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #10: Arches for Aprons

09-04-2016 02:01 PM by EarlS | 2 comments »

Finally feels like the project is starting to move along. Alex from Glass Heritage just told me the glass for the inserts have been cut. He sent some pictures so I can approve the colors. Meanwhile, I’d better pick up the pace if I want the desk to be complete by the time the glass is ready. Making smooth arches seems to baffle a lot of folks. The problem is that most arches require a combination of a circle with a large radius and just the right amount of flattening the circle...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #9: Time to Talk Tenons

09-03-2016 01:07 PM by EarlS | 2 comments »

Time to talk tenons. I’ve made tenons using 3 different methods, a router with a straight bit, a stacked dado on the table saw, and a tenoning jig. Tenoning Jig:I discarded the tenoning jig some time back because it was a pain to set up and keep things square. I never could get the miter bar tight but not too tight and keep things running parallel to the blade which made for tenons that were tight on one end and loose on the other. Long tenons were also a problem since the saw blade wil...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #7: Mortises Three Ways

08-21-2016 01:41 PM by EarlS | 0 comments »

As I mentioned in the last entry I broke the mortising into 3 groups. The big mortises were made using templates and a router. Most of the smaller mortises were ¾” which were made using a ¾” Forstner bit and squaring up the holes with a corner chisel. Some what tedious, but a sharp chisel makes quick work of it. Any square holes that were ½” or smaller were made with a mortising attachment on my drill press. There are some serious shortcomings in the Delta Morti...

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Taliesin Desk Build - How's and Why's #6: Big Mortises

08-14-2016 01:15 PM by EarlS | 2 comments »

All of the leg pieces have been cut to length and marked for the multitude of mortises and tenons. Before I get into the details of what I did, I wanted to talk about options for cutting mortises and tenons. I spent a lot of time researching some of the new options on the market. I really wish I lived near a wood working store that had demonstration tools to look at and maybe even try out. The Festool Domino looks like a biscuit jointer on steroids, with a special router bit mounted h...

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