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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'moulding plane'

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View Mattyboy's profile

Hollow and Round Moulding Plane Build

06-22-2015 09:17 AM by Mattyboy | 6 comments »

After the frustration of eBay, Etsy and tool dealers, I decided to experiment with making my own hollow and round moulding (OK, I’m American but I like the Brit spelling better) planes. Some of you will think I’m a heretic for this, but I made pairs of #6, #8 and #10 by laminating parts together. I am writing this in the hopes it will inspire others to do the same. What follows is the sequence of a typical build. Since this is an experiment and I’m not trying to make p...

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View WoodAndShop's profile

How to Clean & Oil Your Antique Molding Planes

05-29-2014 02:31 PM by WoodAndShop | 0 comments »

By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com) In my above video I show how I clean and oil my antique molding planes. Of course, this method can apply to any wooden hand planes. My friend was kind enough to give me about 65 antique molding planes (thanks Bill!). Instead of spending a ton of time refurbishing them all right now, I thought I’d simply clean and oil them, and refurbish a plane when needed. I like to use boiled linseed oil (if you can’t find it at a local ha...

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View Paul Sellers's profile

Strongest mitre for picture frame - How I made it

02-16-2012 02:42 PM by Paul Sellers | 4 comments »

Moulding the stock Following up from the video film on the strength of these mitres. These are the steps I took to make this picture-frame moulded and inlaid stock and the frame itself. It’s dead straight forward using a pair of wooden T&G planes, a moulding plane, a tenon saw and a plane. You can make a simple shooting board with stop screwed to a board at 45-degrees or a proper one with removable stops. I took about 45 minutes to make it. Mould the stock with the moulding plane. I...

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Wood Types and Properties #2: Know your wood #2-Beech

05-14-2011 05:38 PM by Paul Sellers | 3 comments »

Beech trees grow abundantly throughout the temperate zones of Europe, Asia and North America. The wood is of very even denseness throughout the grain because of its relatively small pores evenly distributed through both the early and late growth of each growth cycle (annual ring). My first mallet was made from beech and most mallets for three hundred years would have come from the beech tree. Though that is the case, and beech is a hard wood, I find beech just a little too soft for making...

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View Kent Shepherd's profile

My Hand Tool Journey #4: Moulding Plane Set-up; Part Two

12-01-2009 01:13 AM by Kent Shepherd | 7 comments »

Last time we were about to reassemble the plane after sharpening. if you have ever set-up and used any wooden plane, you’ll find the principal is the same for a moulding plane. The only real difference is sharpening the profile on the moulding plane. First, place all the parts back in the body. Try to get the iron about even with the sole of the plane.Then, lightly tap on the wedge. If you just get it snug, but not tight, you will be able to then adjust the iron out of the body. If anyt...

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View Kent Shepherd's profile

My Hand Tool Journey #3: Wood Moulding Plane --Set-Up

11-26-2009 01:10 AM by Kent Shepherd | 9 comments »

Last time I showed a wooden moulding plane I have. Now I want to share how I tuned it up. Keep in mind, while I am a professional woodworker, I am not a long time experienced plane user. I have seen some guys doing videos that really know their stuff. I have seen other guys do videos that think they know their stuff. I simply want to share what has worked for me in my short career in hand plane use. Since I don’t have a video camera, this will have to do for now. First, I disassemble...

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View Kent Shepherd's profile

My Hand Tool Journey #2: Hand Plane Use

11-25-2009 01:46 AM by Kent Shepherd | 9 comments »

In part one of this series I showed you many of the hand tools I have accumulated over the years. I guess having fantastic tools doesn’t mean much if you never use them. To be honest, I owned several of mine long before I really knew how to properly tune-up, sharpen, or use them. I guess having my Bridge City planes kinda of spoiled me, because they were so good from the box, I needed no skill to set them up or sharpen them. Then I bought a Leigh-Nielson low angle block plane. It too ne...

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