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azwoodworker

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59 posts in 2834 days

Location: Phoenix Arizona
Website:

I have done a number of things in life but started refinishing when I was 14 for sisters and relatives friends in My Dads basement. Went off to study engineering but came back to woodworking after 40 years. Love working with wood and hoping to make it a full-time endeavor.

I have a small home shop with many milling capacities. I have moved from purchased lumber to milling lumber unique to Arizona. I use an Alaskan Mill with a single chainsaw, 076 or Mcollogh, and a Sperber mill with two Stilth 076AV on a 4-foot bar and a winch.

Currently have a good stock of slabs and lumber and working out the drying. I have done hundreds of projects outdoors and indoors mostly learned as I went with only some classes. I work in the Event Set up industry as a Carpenter and Lighting tech. With Covid that is gone. Still do various woodworking jobs for others, but have not started selling any furniture pieces besides Mantels and other production companies.

Hope soon to be working on My own live pieces and starting to sell the Projects I make.

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7 comments so far

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azwoodworker

59 posts in 2834 days


#1 posted 07-10-2013 02:11 AM

I have purchased a Stanley 45 Combination plane and wondering if anyone knows what the 55 blades fit into the 45.

I managed to pick up some missing parts for it but still have no blades for it. I would like to start with a box of cutting blades but in no real hurry. Mainly purchased it as a part disease and part to solve a problem of matching molding I come across that can’t be made with the router bits I have.

Came across a sale of Box number 2 of the Combo 55 on Craigslist with a little high price but want to check if these blades fit on the 45. The large Blog Blood and Gore state the 45 blades will fit the 45 but most of the 55’s will not fit the 45. He leaves out what blades fit and what does not.

Anyone have any ideas what will fit? The one being sold is Box number 2. Thanks in advance. This is my first posting.

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scrollsaw

13030 posts in 4906 days


#2 posted 07-10-2013 02:11 AM

Welcome to LumberJocks.

-- Todd

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surfin2

51275 posts in 4188 days


#3 posted 07-10-2013 02:38 AM

Go to forums click on Start new topic, pick topic,
enter your question there, you’ll get more responses…

Welcome To LumberJocks.
Good Luck…

-- Rick

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azwoodworker

59 posts in 2834 days


#4 posted 07-10-2013 02:39 AM

Thanks

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a1Jim

118161 posts in 4629 days


#5 posted 07-10-2013 05:53 AM

Welcome to Ljs a world wide community were there are great people,super projects and great woodworkers.Enjoy !
Because I often get asked questions by new members I’ve included the answers to the most( FAQ) along with my welcoming message to LJs.
You should know that posting questions or projects here (your profile page) will not get you very many responses’ just because it’s your profile page not part of a main forum. To post in a main forum read below.
Want to know how to post something?
See the drop-down box underneath my Lumberjocks in the upper right hand corner. Click on the arrow and select which type of posting you want to make (Project, Blog entry, Forum topic). This will take you to the appropriate page and you just fill in the form.
Sending Private messages(PMs) to other members
Click on the word” home” next to the profile picture of the member you want to contact ,then click on “send message”
http://lumberjocks.com/help/getting-started
Need help with posting or other questions ?
Contact:
Martin SojKa ( LJs founder)
http://lumberjocks.com/msojka
Ms DebbieP AKA Debbie Pribele (Ljs community manager)http://lumberjocks.com/MsDebbieP
Just for the record even though I have a large number of post I’m not involved with LJs management ,I’m just another member.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

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SnowyRiver

51458 posts in 4532 days


#6 posted 07-10-2013 12:57 PM

Welcome aboard. It’s great that you could join us on Lumberjocks.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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azwoodworker

59 posts in 2834 days


#7 posted 02-01-2021 09:52 AM

Hi, was doing some research on the slabs and boards on the trees I have been milling over the last few years and came across a post on Aleppo or Afghan pine that I remember seeing when I milled my first Afghan Pine but did not have much to add. Not much else was added since so I thought I’d give some conclusions after drying and building with it. I know Aleppo Pine and Afghan Pine are different, but many people use the names interchangeably. I’ve milled and dried Afghan pine over the last 4 years and found the marble image sap to be remarkably unique to no other wood. In fact, my first thought was the only way to use this wood would be to paint it. The post was on the sap as it was still seeping and will for some time before it really dries. Since that time I found some people really like the intensity of the marble look of the sap.

Points on use.
1) The sap eventually dries to a hardness that can be cut, planed, and worked with, but does get brittle so carving is all hand without the mallet. It can chip easily. Glues fine once dried.

2) Afghan Pine is the hardest pine I have ever used. You can’t dent it with a fingernail no matter the pressure.

3) The Sap and the wood itself take a long time to dry in air drying in Arizona. Far longer than Mesquite, Ash, Cottonwood, Ironwood, or Jupiter. I slabbed a 36 inch wide 7 ft log flatsawn and dried European style and after 1 1/2 years, the sap completely dried. Prior to that I had other slabs I built a number of projects with some of the wood which received a lot less drying time and found to have higher moisture, as I milled the pieces to thickness, and sap still ran but worked with it. In the end, I used flake Shellac as a sanding sealer and it never affected the finished product.

4) The wood sands well, and planes well, and besides taking some time for the sap to dry it is good wood, but soft would not be my definition. I also cut a number for firewood for a client and has to be split as it burns smokey and some find it creates more soot. I gave a number of thick slabs about 10 to 12 inches wide that some of my friends used for Counters at coffee shops.

5) Afghan pine has some extremely thick bark much thicker than any of the woods I milled up, but I also found that it had a very pretty color when the bark was shaved. In this, I used a Jointer to make a tapered leg and shaved the bark. The table after a few years and coated with lacquer still doing well.

6) I decided to make a table with tapered splayed legs and make the Kitchen Hutch. The table was for a friend who wanted a slab and then pushed to make a table. The Table itself was just lacquered. The Afghan pine remained white and did not yellow like normal pine. I did the bark legs design as it wasn’t really my project, but I did not want something without some ascetics to go out of the shop. The Tree was cut in the winter. The Pine cut in the summer the bark falls off but winter seems to stay fixed. I did add some pin nails to some.

The Cabinet I made out of the milled lumber and made the cabinet. There has been no warping or problems with the cabinet. The wood was just air dryed and then I sealed it with Shellac and an oil enamel to complete.

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