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10 Books to Learn Woodworking

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Blog entry by WoodshopTherapy posted 09-04-2021 03:01 PM 547 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m sharing the top 10 woodworking books from the library I’ve built up over the past few decades. I hope you find this helpful and I’ve love to hear your feedback. Scott

Video Link—> https://youtu.be/7jjcYQ8k1qM

-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge



6 comments so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

4682 posts in 3022 days


#1 posted 09-04-2021 03:55 PM

I very seldom click on video links, :) I was getting concerned right up to the #2 pick. That one was my first “real” wood working book I purchased, actually it was loaned to me before I purchased my own, now have all of his plus the Leave Finger Prints by Gaffney, which for me was well worth the purchase.
I would add Greene & Greene by Darrell Peart and Michael Pekovich’s How and Why, Christopher Schwartz,
The Anarchist Tool Chest also rates very high.
LOL! just finished reading David Pye The Nature and Art of Workmanship and think he could of saved about a 100 pages?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3309 posts in 3407 days


#2 posted 09-04-2021 04:56 PM

Thanks for posting these, I’ve found I can never have enough resource material.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View WoodshopTherapy's profile

WoodshopTherapy

119 posts in 1320 days


#3 posted 09-04-2021 05:33 PM

Glad you found them useful! Scott


Thanks for posting these, I ve found I can never have enough resource material.

- Oldtool


-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge

View WoodshopTherapy's profile

WoodshopTherapy

119 posts in 1320 days


#4 posted 09-04-2021 05:35 PM

I’ve been curious about Mike Pekovich’s book. What are your thoughts on it?


I very seldom click on video links, :) I was getting concerned right up to the #2 pick. That one was my first “real” wood working book I purchased, actually it was loaned to me before I purchased my own, now have all of his plus the Leave Finger Prints by Gaffney, which for me was well worth the purchase.
I would add Greene & Greene by Darrell Peart and Michael Pekovich s How and Why, Christopher Schwartz,
The Anarchist Tool Chest also rates very high.
LOL! just finished reading David Pye The Nature and Art of Workmanship and think he could of saved about a 100 pages?

- Andre


-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge

View Andre's profile

Andre

4682 posts in 3022 days


#5 posted 09-05-2021 04:25 AM

Very good, especially liked the details on Kumiko, even made the jigs and made some practice ones.
Some very good inspiration in his projects and can see making some similar small cabinets with the Kuniko inserts.
I like and sort of follow Krenov’s style and find his work in the same sort of style idealism?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Chip201's profile

Chip201

9 posts in 4 days


#6 posted 09-22-2021 03:39 AM

Several months ago, I stumbled across an article about Tage Frid written by Hank Gilpin a former student. I searched and found Hank’s contact info and we shared a few stories . I met Tage when he taught a course at Highland Woodworking in Atlanta years ago. I already had his 3 book set and brought one for him to sign. He graciously said he would and took the book from me. He started laughing as he opened the book and sawdust fell out. He said he had never signed a book that someone had actually used and gotten sawdust in between the pages before. And we talked about what I had been looking at making.

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