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Stickley Coat Rack #3: More Shaping and More Joinery

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Blog entry by WirelessWoodworker posted 06-06-2020 06:39 PM 456 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Starting Joinery and Tapering Part 3 of Stickley Coat Rack series no next part

Last time I worked on the base and post, now I turn my attention to the 4 support pieces around the bottom of the post.

Here’s a video of the process (if the embed doesn’t work – here’s the link: https://youtu.be/2e4x0aqVreI)

The first step was to mortise the post into the base.

I started by drilling out most of the waste, then chopped away the rest of the bulk:

Finally, because I had already rounded the corners of the post, I rounded the corners of the mortise with a carving gouge:

Next step was to fit the corner support pieces to the post/base angle:

This was a little easier said than done, because the post already had a taper on it, so I clamped the post and half the base to the bench in order to be sure it would be straight up and down, then planed the support pieces to fit the angles. The video shows this process a little bit better than I can explain!

Then it was on to shaping the supports:

Finally, on to cutting the joinery between the supports and base/post. Both edges will get two mortise & tenons:

Finally starting to look like something!!

That’s about it for this time – hope you enjoy!

Cheers,
Tim

-- Tim, Delaware, http://www.thewirelesswoodworker.com and YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheWirelessWoodworker



3 comments so far

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

879 posts in 425 days


#1 posted 06-06-2020 08:06 PM

Very nice jointery work! I did have a question though. For cutting the curves in the support piece could a coping saw have made that easier? Would it let you cut closer to the layout lines and then clean it up with spoke shave and rasp?

And I’ve never seen a shoulder plane used to cut a rabbet. That is some “skillz” I do not possess. Probably why I have a No 78 for that sort of thing.

Keep up the good work. Can’t wait to see when its finished.

View WirelessWoodworker's profile

WirelessWoodworker

86 posts in 2027 days


#2 posted 06-07-2020 02:00 AM



Very nice jointery work! I did have a question though. For cutting the curves in the support piece could a coping saw have made that easier? Would it let you cut closer to the layout lines and then clean it up with spoke shave and rasp?

And I ve never seen a shoulder plane used to cut a rabbet. That is some “skillz” I do not possess. Probably why I have a No 78 for that sort of thing.

Keep up the good work. Can t wait to see when its finished.

- sansoo22

Thanks Sansoo!

I debated about using either the coping saw or just rough sawing it – you could certainly do it either way. The ideal hand tool would be a frame saw, which would make quick work of it, but that’s still on my list to make one of these days!

I have a skew rabbet plane that I would typically use for cutting rabbets, but for the life of me I could not figure out a good way to hold this odd shaped piece to use it! The shoulder plane works just fine for rabbets though. The best way is to just clamp a square reference face to the piece along the base of the rabbet and use that to guide the plane – works incredibly well actually. For this one I chiseled a knife line along the base of the rabbet, then used that as a reference face for the plane. You have to be a little careful the first couple swipes, but after that it guides itself.

Thanks again Sansoo!

Cheers,
Tim

-- Tim, Delaware, http://www.thewirelesswoodworker.com and YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheWirelessWoodworker

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

879 posts in 425 days


#3 posted 06-07-2020 02:32 AM

Thanks for the pointers on using the shoulder plane for rabbets. I hadnt considered a reference edge to keep it in place and on track. You’ve got more hand tool skills than I. I have an outdoor table project coming up that should get me some good practice tho. Will be using machines for dimensions and all hand tools for the joints and finishing. Which reminds me I still need a brace and some standard size auger bits.

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