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Stickley Coat Rack #1: Rough Cut, Milling, and Shaping

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Blog entry by WirelessWoodworker posted 05-17-2020 05:09 PM 497 reads 0 times favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Stickley Coat Rack series Part 2: Starting Joinery and Tapering »

My next project is going to be a fairly simple Stickley style coat rack or coat tree maybe it’s called. We enter our house via the garage door probably 90% of the time and our coat closet it by the front door, which is through our dining room from the garage, sooo… obviously most of our coats don’t actually make it to the closet – they end up draped over the backs of the dining room chairs. I wanted to tidy this up a bit, so thought I’d just go out and buy a cheap free-standing coat rack (rather than mounting hooks to the wall, so that when we have company we can just hide the rack in another room). Well, apparently these are hard to come by nowadays, so I figured why not make one!

You can watch part 1 of the project here:

Youtube Video

The basic design is taken from a relatively simple looking Stickley example I saw online:

The actual dimensions are based on a piece of leftover cherry I had in the shop, so may be a little shorter than I’d planned, but this could be good for my 5-year old to reach the top. First step – mark out my rough cuts:

Then go ahead and actually rough cut everything:

This includes re-sawing the 8/4 stock for the supports at the bottom:

Now I mill everything down to size:

I start with a jack plane with a decent camber on the iron, then switch to a jointer plane to get things flat. Finally, some cutting to final length (could certainly have used my new flip-up bench stop for this if it was added then!!):

And start the shaping:

The cut-out section on the bottom of the “feet” can actually be done a number of different ways with hand tools. For these types of cuts I typically make a bunch of kerfs with the saw, then knock-out most of the waste with a chisel, and clean-up with either a chisel, spokeshave, plane, or most likely a combination of all three. What do you guys typically do???

That’s a good place to stop for the first part! Next time I’ll start on the joinery, which should be fun due to the slight taper on the main post.

Thanks for taking a look!

Cheers,
Tim

-- Tim, Delaware, http://www.thewirelesswoodworker.com and YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheWirelessWoodworker



2 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3671 posts in 3084 days


#1 posted 05-18-2020 05:44 PM

Looks like a very good start on the coat rack. Kudos for using so many hand tools. I’m not sure I would get much woodworking done, or that it would be usable, if I had to use hand tools extensively.

Can’t go wrong with Stickley either.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View WirelessWoodworker's profile

WirelessWoodworker

84 posts in 1993 days


#2 posted 05-18-2020 06:15 PM



Looks like a very good start on the coat rack. Kudos for using so many hand tools. I m not sure I would get much woodworking done, or that it would be usable, if I had to use hand tools extensively.

Can t go wrong with Stickley either.

- EarlS

Thanks Earl!

It does take me a bit longer to get things done, but that’s the benefit of not being a professional – no timelines!

Cheers,
Tim

-- Tim, Delaware, http://www.thewirelesswoodworker.com and YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheWirelessWoodworker

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