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Greene & Greene Thorsen Sideboard #6: Veneering the Panels

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 12-30-2019 05:33 PM 683 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Mortising Part 6 of Greene & Greene Thorsen Sideboard series no next part

With the majority of the joinery completed, I move on to making the veneered panels. I use a vacuum press to attach the 1/16” sapele veneer to the Baltic birch cores.

The veneer is arranged in a book match pattern. To assure a tight fit between the veneers, I first pull them together with a stretchy blue tape on the back side. The elastic nature of the tape helps pull the joint tight. Once taped and tight, I flip the veneers over and apply a strip of veneer tape down the center of the seam. The blue tape is then removed.

I mix up a small batch of UltraCAT veneer adhesive, spread evenly on the Baltic birch cores with a roller and apply the veneers top and bottom. I slip them into the vacuum bag, and let them cure overnight. An old heating blanket over the top helps the adhesive cure.

Next Steps: Cut square holes for the ebony plugs and shape the parts in preparation for assembly.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



12 comments so far

View sras's profile

sras

5310 posts in 3767 days


#1 posted 12-30-2019 06:56 PM

Nice progress! Where did you source your veneer?

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1133 days


#2 posted 12-30-2019 07:25 PM



Nice progress! Where did you source your veneer?

- sras


Steve- I ordered the veneer through Certainly Woods, except for the veneer for the doors which I resawed from the same board I cut the drawer fronts from.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View ShopCat's profile

ShopCat

121 posts in 4217 days


#3 posted 12-30-2019 11:08 PM

The vacuum press and bag look very JoeWoodworker. If so, what is the gray box on the side of the press

-- ShopCat

View ShopCat's profile

ShopCat

121 posts in 4217 days


#4 posted 12-30-2019 11:21 PM

Also, I have a tub of UltraCat, never used it. I started out years ago with Titebond Coldpress, bought the UltraCat, but end up using the Titebond. I have a couple of projects where I am going to need a very durable long term bond, and while I’ve never had Titebond fail, it’s never been used on anything heavy duty. JoeWW is very sold on the UCat, seems to know what he’s doing. So how do you like UC?

-- ShopCat

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1133 days


#5 posted 12-31-2019 12:07 AM



The vacuum press and bag look very JoeWoodworker. If so, what is the gray box on the side of the press

- ShopCat


It’s just a J-box to hold the wiring

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1133 days


#6 posted 12-31-2019 12:13 AM



Also, I have a tub of UltraCat, never used it. I started out years ago with Titebond Coldpress, bought the UltraCat, but end up using the Titebond. I have a couple of projects where I am going to need a very durable long term bond, and while I ve never had Titebond fail, it s never been used on anything heavy duty. JoeWW is very sold on the UCat, seems to know what he s doing. So how do you like UC?

- ShopCat


I prefer urea formaldehyde glues for veneer work due to the rigidity of the bond line. I’d choose something different if I needed flexibility in the finished panel. UltraCAT works well as do the other brands of UF. Be sure to wear a respirator if you choose to use it when it’s in powder form.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Rich's profile

Rich

5241 posts in 1227 days


#7 posted 12-31-2019 12:21 AM

Looks awesome as usual, Tung. I gotta ask though, is that a workshop or a hospital operating room? It’s so clean. I bet you could eat off of those floors. Just so long as my wife doesn’t see those photos. I’ve convinced her a shop should have a few inches of sawdust and cutoffs on the floor.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8468 posts in 3436 days


#8 posted 12-31-2019 01:23 AM

Looking good.
+1 on UF glues vs PVA for the hard glue line. The drawbacks to UF are toxicity, the need for very good clamping pressure, and the lack of reversibility. I prefer animal glues for those reasons but UF glues are a close second.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View pottz's profile

pottz

7950 posts in 1622 days


#9 posted 12-31-2019 03:08 AM



Looks awesome as usual, Tung. I gotta ask though, is that a workshop or a hospital operating room? It s so clean. I bet you could eat off of those floors. Just so long as my wife doesn t see those photos. I ve convinced her a shop should have a few inches of sawdust and cutoffs on the floor.

- Rich


you just missed the nurse as she ducked out of the pic-lol.it is clean and the beautiful work that comes out of it is very clean.i always love a tungoil journey,it never dissapoints.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1133 days


#10 posted 12-31-2019 01:28 PM



Looks awesome as usual, Tung. I gotta ask though, is that a workshop or a hospital operating room? It s so clean. I bet you could eat off of those floors. Just so long as my wife doesn t see those photos. I ve convinced her a shop should have a few inches of sawdust and cutoffs on the floor.

- Rich


I sweep it all off stage right ….

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1133 days


#11 posted 12-31-2019 01:33 PM



Looking good.
+1 on UF glues vs PVA for the hard glue line. The drawbacks to UF are toxicity, the need for very good clamping pressure, and the lack of reversibility. I prefer animal glues for those reasons but UF glues are a close second.

- shipwright


Thanks Paul, and excellent points on the UF. Toxicity is a serious issue with this stuff. The powder is very fine and light, easily airborne and breathed in. And since it’s water activated….not a good thing to breath in!

If I ever attempt anything remotely as detailed as your work I’d definitely be looking at Hyde glue for the reversibility.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3295 posts in 1860 days


#12 posted 12-31-2019 03:25 PM

I have a largish veneering project coming up, great to see a master woodsman hard at it for inspiration!

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