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Greene & Greene Thorsen Sideboard #5: Mortising

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 12-21-2019 02:48 AM 754 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Material Prep Part 5 of Greene & Greene Thorsen Sideboard series Part 6: Veneering the Panels »

With the rough material preparation complete, I work on bringing the stock to final dimensions and cutting the mortises. I start by flattening one face of each part on the jointer, then square up one adjacent edge. The opposite face is planed parallel and then the part is cut to width on the table saw. To clean up any saw marks left by the table saw, I make a final pass on the jointer.

This sideboard is like a 3D puzzle. I mark the parts carefully to be sure I keep them correctly oriented as I cut the mortises and rabbets. To help keep things straight, I break the sideboard up into several smaller sub-assemblies, starting with the leg sections.

I cut the mortises for the floating tenons using the Leigh FMT Pro. Since the parts have a 3/16” offset, I make up a 3/16” shim to space the parts while cutting the mortises.

Some of the parts require long stopped grooves for the veneered side panels. Years ago I made the Jeffery Miller mortising block from plans in FWW magazine. This is a useful jig for making this type of groove since it can produce very long, accurate stopped grooves with ease. I use the 3/16” shim here as well to be sure the groove are aligned properly after assembly.

Since I am using 3/4” baltic birch cores veneered with 1/16” sapele on both sides, my grooves need to be 13/16”, which requires two passes with the router bit.

To finish the grooves, I square up the corners with chisels.

I do a quick dry assembly of the sideboard to check the fit of the parts and panels and check for any interferences. Everything looks good so far. This view also shows why I needed to make my benchtop larger for this project.

Next Steps: Veneer and fit the panels for the bottoms and backs.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



9 comments so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

7950 posts in 1622 days


#1 posted 12-21-2019 03:14 AM

damn it tung when you throw out the candy like this i just want to come over with a nice pinot and help you make some dust buddy.nice work.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View stefang's profile

stefang

17039 posts in 3972 days


#2 posted 12-21-2019 10:23 AM

Very nice work. I can’t help being a little envious of your large assortment of Powermatic tools and a so well organized shop.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View sras's profile

sras

5310 posts in 3767 days


#3 posted 12-21-2019 04:09 PM

I’m enjoying the progress update!

Do you happen to know the FWW issue number for that jig? I’m having trouble finding it in my search effort (so far)...

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1133 days


#4 posted 12-21-2019 04:14 PM



I m enjoying the progress update!

Do you happen to know the FWW issue number for that jig? I m having trouble finding it in my search effort (so far)...

- sras


Issue 172.

https://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/27/how-to-cut-mortises-with-a-plunge-router

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View sras's profile

sras

5310 posts in 3767 days


#5 posted 12-21-2019 05:17 PM

Thanks! It is now saved!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1133 days


#6 posted 12-21-2019 06:20 PM

And I should correct my post- the mortise block design is by Jeffrey Miller not Jeffrey Greene (a guy I worked with years ago….).

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

629 posts in 417 days


#7 posted 12-21-2019 09:53 PM

The FMT Pro is a sweet item.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3489 posts in 2986 days


#8 posted 12-22-2019 01:05 AM

G&G furniture always looks amazing but the devil is in the details and there are so many of them you can get lost without keeping careful track of what goes where like you are doing. The FMT Pro looks like it really helped with a lot of the mortises. I’m going to have to look up that jig.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View pottz's profile

pottz

7950 posts in 1622 days


#9 posted 12-22-2019 01:22 AM



G&G furniture always looks amazing but the devil is in the details and there are so many of them you can get lost without keeping careful track of what goes where like you are doing. The FMT Pro looks like it really helped with a lot of the mortises. I m going to have to look up that jig.

- EarlS

good point earl,i made a g&g hall table with 3 drawers and i thought it looked simple but wow was i surprised at the amount of work doing it right.i have a great appreciation for anyone doing it at the level tung does.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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