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Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #29: Corner Bracing and Slip Seats

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 03-28-2019 12:17 AM 1111 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 28: Chair Assembly Part 29 of Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair series Part 30: Stain and Finish »

With the chair assembled , the next step is to fabricate and install the corner braces and slip seats. To get the miter angles accurate for the corner blocks, I use a Bora MiteriX angle duplicator.

After measuring the angle, one side of the tool is removed to set the miter saw.

The resulting angles make for a perfect fit. I add some glue and screw the blocks in place set so the top of the slip seat is flush with the top of the chair side rails.

The slip seats are cut from Baltic birch plywood. To facilitate cutting the seats, I make a tablesaw sled to cut the angles.

The slip seats are difficult to cut accurately since each chair is slightly different. I sneak up on the correct angles and assure there is clearance for the seat covering using shims all around.

Next steps: drop off the slip seats at the upholster, stain and finish.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



4 comments so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

6210 posts in 3696 days


#1 posted 03-28-2019 02:40 AM

Hey that’s looking pretty neat. Did you leave enough room for upholstery? I usually leave 1/4” on each side for batting and leather when I make cushions. Let the upholstery shop make the call, but be sure to communicate with them about the clearance.

Lookin’ good!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4009 posts in 3231 days


#2 posted 03-28-2019 02:46 AM

That is a slick tool. Gotta remember that one. I made frames for the upholstery without the slip seat. There is some sag in the seat already.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1383 posts in 1378 days


#3 posted 03-28-2019 02:58 AM



Hey that s looking pretty neat. Did you leave enough room for upholstery? I usually leave 1/4” on each side for batting and leather when I make cushions. Let the upholstery shop make the call, but be sure to communicate with them about the clearance.

Lookin good!

- pintodeluxe


It’s a good point Willie, I did talk to the upholsterer about clearance and for the leather I’m using they suggested no more than 1/8” all around. When I got the cutting for color approval, I used it to zero in on the actual size which is slightly under 1/8”.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1383 posts in 1378 days


#4 posted 03-28-2019 03:01 AM



That is a slick tool. Gotta remember that one. I made frames for the upholstery without the slip seat. There is some sag in the seat already.

- EarlS


I spoke to the upholster about that as well. They advised to use a solid plywood slipseat and based on the approval sets they covered for me earlier this week they were right. Very comfy.

One thing about leather that I forgot to mention in my write up is to drill some air holes in the slip seat to allow the seat to breath. Unlike fabrics covering, the leather acts like a balloon if you don’t add breather holes.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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