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Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #21: Side Rails and Front Legs-Part 2

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 05-01-2018 01:37 AM 2939 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 20: Side Rails and Front Legs-Part 1 Part 21 of Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair series Part 22: Lower Stretchers »

With the side rail mortises complete, I move on to cutting the front rails and mortises. The Leigh FMT makes quick work of the remaining mortises. Next I trace the cloud lifts onto the side and front rails, rough cut the parts on the bandsaw and clean them up with a spiral pattern router bit.

The side rails are matching pairs resawn from 8/4 stock, so I keep them together as I work.

A quick test fit shows everything fits together nicely.

Next steps: Complete the lower stretcher components.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



6 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3428 posts in 2955 days


#1 posted 05-01-2018 02:03 AM

Your profile is the “We Love to Work the Wood” on the front page of LJ.

I can see the lower right stretcher with the cloud lift in the last picture. Looks like they are getting close to being built. I’m guessing you have loads of square ebony plugs ready to install once you mortise the holes?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1102 days


#2 posted 05-02-2018 01:51 AM

That lower stretcher you see is on the prototype chair that I made at the Marc Adams class in the fall, but the rest will look the same of course. Unfortunately, I have just a handful of ebony plugs left over, so I will need to go into ‘plug production’ mode again soon to crank out a batch. Fortunately this chair has relatively few plugs, so there will not be that many to make.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1612 posts in 4166 days


#3 posted 05-02-2018 03:15 PM

Are you going to use the method that Darrell Peart describes in his book on how to make pillowed plugs?

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1372 posts in 1102 days


#4 posted 05-02-2018 04:38 PM



Are you going to use the method that Darrell Peart describes in his book on how to make pillowed plugs?

- CaptainSkully


I have used Darrell’s ‘mouse pad’ method.. I also messed with William Eng’s method of using a hand drill. Both work well, but a little tedious.

On my dining table build I moved to chucking my square ebony stock in a 4 jaw chuck on the lathe and shaping the pillow with a file. I then sand the end of the plug with sanding sponges of progressively finer grits, all in the lathe. I will also skip the polishing step this time as i saw no difference in the appearance of the plugs when spraying lacquer.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View James E McIntyre's profile (online now)

James E McIntyre

571 posts in 1899 days


#5 posted 05-02-2018 05:06 PM

Great work. Can’t wait to see it completed.

-- James E McIntyre

View EläväPuu's profile

EläväPuu

33 posts in 1888 days


#6 posted 01-10-2020 05:54 AM

I’ve also experimented with both methods and settled on a compromise. Darrell mentions the height of the plugs as being super short, which means any overruns on pillowing requires excess height to keep it above the surface. Finishing the plugs off the workpiece is therefore work intensive and risky. Instead, I do light pillowing by hand to 360 grit, install and finish to smoothness in place with tape masking. The trick is using Abralon pads – in my case on a Mirka DEROS 2.5 with a little hand finessing – to truly blend each plug. Original G&G pieces look like the plugs were finished in place also, however I’m sure that can’t be the case for everything. Still, doing so seems to be a step in the right direction towards the flowing naturalistic feel of the originals. Similar to yourself Tung, I’ve pored over countless photos analysing the curvatures that routing on its own doesn’t come close to replicating. One has to bear in mind the sort of workflow, tooling and machinery available to the Hall Bros. in their mill back then….it certainly highlights how many modern reproductions of G&G pieces fall short of the mark in terms of the feel and form, which to my mind are key. Props for taking time to absorb this! It shows.

-- "What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence"

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