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Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #16: Center Back Slat- Part 1

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 01-29-2018 02:24 AM 2405 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 15: Crest Rails Part 16 of Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair series Part 17: Center Back Slat- Part 2 »

After finishing up the crest rails, I move on to the center back slats. I begin by making up the loose tenon stock I will need. After cutting the stock to width, I fine tune the thickness with the drum sander and add the rounded edges with a bullnose bit in the router table.

I start by making a test center slat from poplar. I cut the angled ends and mortises while the stock still has straight edges. To determine the angles for the end cuts, I use a MDF story stick. By cutting the angles on the end of the story stick, I can sneak up on the correct length for the part. Using the side profile template, I mark the story stick to show the outline of the part.

I transfer the angles to the miter saw and trim the ends.

After the end cuts are made, I set up the parts in the Leigh FMT and cut the mortises.

With the mortising complete, I move on to cutting the curves. First I rough cut the inside curve with the bandsaw. My original plan was to pattern sand the curves. I set up the pattern sanding jigs and did a test with my poplar set-up part. The sanding time was excessive, so I decided to go old school and broke out the spoke shaves to perform the preliminary cleanup work, then finished off the part on the belt sander.

Once the curves are complete I tape the cutoffs back in place and band saw the profile. A few strokes with the spoke shave cleans up the edges. A float and some thin files clean up the ‘V’ cut in the bottom. The spoke shaves and floats work well to break the edges.

A quick test shows the center slat fits nicely.

With my poplar test piece completed, I move on to making the real parts. For the actual chair components, I rough out fourteen blanks 9 inches wide then rip 1-3/4 inches off either side.

I make sure to keep the parts carefully labeled to maintain grain alignment for the finished chairs.

I set aside the side slats for now to work on the center slats. Back at the miter saw I cut the angled ends. After cutting one side, I set up a stop block to assure all of the center slats are the same finished length.

With all of the stock cut to length, I’m ready to move to the next step, cutting the mortises and curves.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



16 comments so far

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

5508 posts in 1399 days


#1 posted 01-29-2018 02:39 AM

this just inspires me to do more and be better buddy,thank you for taking the time to do these awesome project tutorials! fantastic work my friend.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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pintodeluxe

5949 posts in 3228 days


#2 posted 01-29-2018 05:07 AM

That must have felt good to get the test slat fit. It’s looking good now!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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EarlS

2862 posts in 2762 days


#3 posted 01-29-2018 12:39 PM

That poplar test piece even looks great as the back splat. Looks like the crest rails turned out good as well. It looks like you have a lot of waste on the curves. Are going to be able to use any of it for smaller pieces?

I’m a bit lost on your reference to using the spoke shave on the curve. Is there a reason you didn’t use template routing to get the final curve and then sand it smooth?

I also see your white lead pencil. I ordered a couple of them after you sent me the details on how to find them. They do a much better job of marking than the white pencil I was using.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View stefang's profile

stefang

16705 posts in 3748 days


#4 posted 01-29-2018 12:43 PM

Wow, these are going to be beautiful chairs, can’t wait to see the final results.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1271 posts in 909 days


#5 posted 01-29-2018 02:44 PM



That poplar test piece even looks great as the back splat. Looks like the crest rails turned out good as well. It looks like you have a lot of waste on the curves. Are going to be able to use any of it for smaller pieces?

I m a bit lost on your reference to using the spoke shave on the curve. Is there a reason you didn t use template routing to get the final curve and then sand it smooth?

I also see your white lead pencil. I ordered a couple of them after you sent me the details on how to find them. They do a much better job of marking than the white pencil I was using.

- EarlS


Im happy with the crest rails. I decided not to post any update after I made them since it was really just ‘I made 14 more just like the first one, and it took a looooooong time’.

A lot of waste is a huge understatement. I’ll try to remember to post a picture of my scrap barrels – they are overflowing, and I’ve already sent a lot through the fireplace already. I doubt I will be able to use much of the cut-off for anything useful. I tend to not keep smaller pieces of material under a few feet long. After many years of hoarding that stuff I finally admitted to myself I would never use it so it went into the fireplace.

This center splat is 5” wide at the bottom, making it too wide to pattern route or pattern shape (at least on my shaper). It is even too wide for the pattern sander setup I made, but at least with that arrangement I could sand most of the shape then flip the part and pattern route the remainder. I did start doing that on the test part but it was just too slow (or maybe I was being impatient) and my bandsaw cut was very close to the line so I just switched to the spokeshaves and sander to clean it up. I may switch back to the pattern sander after I do a few more parts, depends on the results I’m getting.

Those fabric pencils work really well on this darker material, ebony and walnut especially.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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EarlS

2862 posts in 2762 days


#6 posted 01-29-2018 06:36 PM

I know what you mean about hoarding scraps that you have every intention to use. It feels wrong to throw them away or burn them, but a yer’s scraps can be a pretty big pile. That’s why I’m doing the 2018 box swap, to use some of the scraps. I’m also going to go crazy on clocks and any manner of other interesting nic-nacs, at least until I get tired of working with little projects and switch back to big pieces. My goal this spring is to clear out the scraps and also use all of the lumber I’ve been hoarding as well.

I found the I could use my 5” random orbit sander to sand the concave (front) portion of the crest and back rails without things looking too wavy (180/220 grit). I also used it on the convex (back) curve to good effect.

I saw some yellow, red, green, and blue lead for the fabric pencils on Amazon. Might have to try some just for fun.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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TungOil

1271 posts in 909 days


#7 posted 01-30-2018 03:30 AM

Earl- to your question about scrap-

Here the scrap pile so far:

And this pile will have some usable pieces for the side and front apron pieces

Tonight I was able to work through the first center splat in sapele. Here are the cut offs from just one center splat:

I will finish up these parts with the ROS when I’m closer to being ready to assemble everthing.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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EarlS

2862 posts in 2762 days


#8 posted 01-30-2018 12:23 PM

You know you COULD make a few end grain cutting boards with all that scrap and post it in the Projects…... ;-D

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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pottz

5508 posts in 1399 days


#9 posted 01-30-2018 03:50 PM

tung you have more scrap left from one project than most guys have in there total wood supply-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View abie's profile

abie

888 posts in 4185 days


#10 posted 01-30-2018 04:12 PM

A wonderful series with great picts
I don’t make G&G Stuff anymore but should I , this is a great series to bookmark,
TNX

-- Bruce. a mind is like a book it is only useful when open.

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TungOil

1271 posts in 909 days


#11 posted 01-30-2018 04:52 PM



tung you have more scrap left from one project than most guys have in there total wood supply-lol.

- pottz


Unfortunately you are right, I’m tripping over the stuff right now. Need to get the fireplace going …..

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Mean_Dean

6970 posts in 3562 days


#12 posted 01-30-2018 06:43 PM

Looks like you’re making some pretty good progress! I’ve been enjoying this project so far!

As for your scraps, I’d hate to see you burn them. I’ve had some success selling my scraps on Craigslist, as pen-turning blanks, or other small-project pieces. Not only does selling them get them out of your shop, another woodworker gets some nice wood cheaply, and you get a few coins in your pocket to use on future projects.

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

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TungOil

1271 posts in 909 days


#13 posted 01-30-2018 06:51 PM


You know you COULD make a few end grain cutting boards with all that scrap and post it in the Projects…... ;-D

- EarlS


I don’t think I have enough friends to give them away to if I were to use up all that scrap on cutting boards!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1271 posts in 909 days


#14 posted 01-30-2018 06:53 PM



Looks like you re making some pretty good progress! I ve been enjoying this project so far!

As for your scraps, I d hate to see you burn them. I ve had some success selling my scraps on Craigslist, as pen-turning blanks, or other small-project pieces. Not only does selling them get them out of your shop, another woodworker gets some nice wood cheaply, and you get a few coins in your pocket to use on future projects.

- Mean_Dean


Not a bad idea, how big is a typical pen turning blank? I can probably cut about 1,000 of them from my scrap pile…....

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

5508 posts in 1399 days


#15 posted 01-30-2018 06:57 PM

Looks like you re making some pretty good progress! I ve been enjoying this project so far!

As for your scraps, I d hate to see you burn them. I ve had some success selling my scraps on Craigslist, as pen-turning blanks, or other small-project pieces. Not only does selling them get them out of your shop, another woodworker gets some nice wood cheaply, and you get a few coins in your pocket to use on future projects.

- Mean_Dean

Not a bad idea, how big is a typical pen turning blank? I can probably cut about 1,000 of them from my scrap pile…....

- TungOil
</bloc> long-hundreds-ha.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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