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1880s Counter #10: Top, Trim-out, and Infrastructure

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Blog entry by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 02-11-2020 11:54 PM 1201 reads 0 times favorited 43 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: What's the Latest on the Top? Part 10 of 1880s Counter series no next part

Lots of content added to comments section of last blog entry, but I’ll catch everyone up on progress. Specifically, the top has been cut to final width, planed with various smoothers (4, 4 1/2, 1), and edged with stock that matches the stuff originally found around the top. I decided to paint said edging, as the original was.

Then it was placed on the counter carcase at Dad’s shop; AND IT FIT! :-)

Today it was about cutting and applying the large original beading profile that is part of the base build-up. I made additional large bead with the nosing plane.

The final bottom skirt board sits proud of the corner stiles by 1/2”. For that, and to start on what will be my back cabinet buildout, I opted for some 2×4 infrastructure.

Next time, I’ll work that framing along each end cap, and (hopefully) complete the bottom skirt board mitering / install.

In the meantime, the piece is looking quite good to my eye.

As always, thanks for looking!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -



43 comments so far

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theoldfart

11119 posts in 3083 days


#1 posted 02-12-2020 12:12 AM

Oh my! It sure is easy on the eyes Smitty. Real nice workmanship on the nosing.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#2 posted 02-12-2020 12:18 AM

Thx Kevin! Yeah, cutting five of those 7/8” inside mitre pieces on the G-P was lots of fun. Thank goodness for a bit of wax and WD-40 to get it moving smoothly. Also need to tighten the king bolt to eliminate some play in the box. But all went very well. And, had the 51/52 shoot board to clean up wherever needed.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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theoldfart

11119 posts in 3083 days


#3 posted 02-12-2020 12:47 AM

Wooden noser or the 45?

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#4 posted 02-12-2020 12:49 AM

Mr. Crannell’s nosing plane.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View Don W's profile

Don W

19478 posts in 3199 days


#5 posted 02-12-2020 01:04 AM

You’ve definitely had some good ones, but you’ve outdone yourself on this one.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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theoldfart

11119 posts in 3083 days


#6 posted 02-12-2020 01:06 AM

What he said.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#7 posted 02-12-2020 02:03 AM

Thanks very much, Don Yoda. It does seem like an extension of all the stuff I’ve done to this point, just on a bigger scale. Building out the backside is going to be fun, already looking forward to doing that with some drawers and open shelves.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#8 posted 02-12-2020 03:20 AM

I’m needing to make a bunch of bevel cuts in the 1×6 skirt board stock, and want to do it by hand. Any alternatives out there vs. making a deep mitrebox?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4557 posts in 1214 days


#9 posted 02-12-2020 03:35 AM

A miter jack / donkey ear? Or am I misunderstanding which way you’re wanting to cut? You don’t need a scie à recaler to cut on one. A tenoning saw can also do the trick.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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sras

5307 posts in 3761 days


#10 posted 02-12-2020 03:42 AM

This is looking really good. I’m already looking forward to the next chapter!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#11 posted 02-12-2020 03:46 AM

Good questions.

RE: your mitre jack: “I clamped a piece of ½”x6” poplar in the jaws, got out my jack plane (pretty sure the jacks aren’t related) and started removing wood.”

Now, clamp a piece of 7/8” x 6” x 59” long into the jaws. Also, I need a piece that’s 7/8” thick by 6” wide and 7/8” long.

Does the donkey ear simply get clamped to long stock as it sits on the bench? Is that how house carpenters cut bevels on long pieces of 10” baseboard a century ago (for example)?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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Dave Polaschek

4557 posts in 1214 days


#12 posted 02-12-2020 04:25 AM

Does the donkey ear simply get clamped to long stock as it sits on the bench? Is that how house carpenters cut bevels on long pieces of 10” baseboard a century ago (for example)?

The donkey ear is clamped to the bench (or held in a face vise), and the stock is clamped (or screwed) to it, in my experience. It’s one of the ways you’d cut a long bevel on a piece of baseboard. I haven’t seen one more than a couple feet long, but I can’t think of a reason you couldn’t make one longer (assuming you can keep the top rail from flexing).

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#13 posted 02-12-2020 05:09 AM

Thx Steve, glad you’re enjoying!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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theoldfart

11119 posts in 3083 days


#14 posted 02-12-2020 05:26 AM

Smitty, remember that jointer fence you sold me a few years ago? :-)

It’s perfect for this task.

Edit: what direction is the cut cross cut or rip?

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16434 posts in 3250 days


#15 posted 02-12-2020 05:32 AM

Here’s a shot of skirt board with the 45 crosscut I’m talking about. Without rot, the board is about 6” high.Easy cut for a SCMS…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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