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"Parasitic" floor lamp #7: Turret revisited

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Blog entry by Ross Leidy posted 09-05-2021 03:51 PM 469 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Turret/Arm assembly Part 7 of "Parasitic" floor lamp series Part 8: Light box and louver shaping »

After moving the temporarily-assembled lamp to where it might finally reside, I could get a better view of its proportions and see if any adjustments were needed before proceeding. With a taped-together light box sitting on top, my wife and I gave it the critical eye. This was a useful exercise, because she noted that the turret height looked a little short with the light box in-place. I reluctantly had to agree. So, I built a new turret cap.

In order to get the additional cap thickness, I had to make it in two pieces – one the visible disk, and the other the inset disk with the pocket for the bearing race.

Then glued together:

And a deeper counterbore on top to accept the t-nut.

This gave me about 5/8” or so additional height for the turret.

And a preview with the light box in place.



11 comments so far

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1375 posts in 2934 days


#1 posted 09-05-2021 05:54 PM

Definitely better proprotions now with the box on top. Your wife has a good eye

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5761 posts in 2443 days


#2 posted 09-05-2021 06:19 PM

I think a typical design approach is that converging curves/angles should visually intersect at some feature.
In this case I see the intersection of the legs hitting the top surface of the light box. Without the extra height you added, they’d intersect above.

For some reason This just looks “right”.

Besides, the Martian walkers need necks 8^)

View Ron Stewart's profile

Ron Stewart

328 posts in 3724 days


#3 posted 09-06-2021 03:12 PM

This is a fascinating project, Ross. I love projects that are a combination of woodworking, engineering, and art, and this one ticks all three boxes.

I’m curious to see how you’re going to wire up the bulb socket(s). “Turret” implies rotation, and I’ve been wondering if you were going to route the wiring through the turret or use some type of rotating contacts. I guess I’ll just have to wait for a future installment to see…

-- Ron Stewart

View JOINAZ's profile

JOINAZ

2 posts in 31 days


#4 posted 09-06-2021 03:18 PM

Wow, well done!

View Ross Leidy's profile

Ross Leidy

281 posts in 3162 days


#5 posted 09-07-2021 01:03 PM



Definitely better proprotions now with the box on top. Your wife has a good eye

- kaerlighedsbamsen


I agree on both points.

View Ross Leidy's profile

Ross Leidy

281 posts in 3162 days


#6 posted 09-07-2021 01:09 PM



I think a typical design approach is that converging curves/angles should visually intersect at some feature.
In this case I see the intersection of the legs hitting the top surface of the light box. Without the extra height you added, they d intersect above.

For some reason This just looks “right”.

Besides, the Martian walkers need necks 8^)

- splintergroup

Nice tip on the design heuristic. I will keep that in my toolbox.

I agree on the longer neck. It’s more appropriate for that alien look.

View Ross Leidy's profile

Ross Leidy

281 posts in 3162 days


#7 posted 09-07-2021 01:21 PM



This is a fascinating project, Ross. I love projects that are a combination of woodworking, engineering, and art, and this one ticks all three boxes.

I’m curious to see how you’re going to wire up the bulb socket(s). “Turret” implies rotation, and I’ve been wondering if you were going to route the wiring through the turret or use some type of rotating contacts. I guess I’ll just have to wait for a future installment to see…

- Ron Stewart


Thanks, Ron. Definitely no rotating contacts, although that’s an interesting thought. I plan to take the simple approach and route the wiring out of the back panel like the original. I would like to somehow hide the cord along the back side of a leg so it’s not just dangling straight down. I haven’t yet worked-out how to best accomplish that.

Here’s the only picture I’ve been able to find of the back side of the light box. I do like the idea of having some openings for patterned light to shine back on the wall. I may do something other than slots, though.

View Ron Stewart's profile

Ron Stewart

328 posts in 3724 days


#8 posted 09-07-2021 10:56 PM

After I posted my comment, I looked at your first post again and realized that the light source is effectively a rear-positioned, front-facing light panel. I was erroneously thinking of a central bulb (or small line of bulbs) with the wiring going through the turret (even though you hadn’t drilled a hole for wiring). I get it now—the rotating louvers won’t allow that.

It would be cool to route the wiring through one of the legs, but it too late for that (unless you can acquire a five-foot self-tunneling SmartBit). I’ve wondered about cutting an over-wide leg in half, routing a half-depth channel inside each half (along with entry/exit channels near the ends), and gluing the halves back together. I’m sure you already thought of something like that, though.

-- Ron Stewart

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8297 posts in 1802 days


#9 posted 09-08-2021 02:16 AM

Hmm. Alternately, lose the cord. There’s an LED light panel I saw that’ll run on its internal batteries for eight hours, which seems like a long enough run time, if you don’t mind plugging it in to recharge now and again.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Ross Leidy's profile

Ross Leidy

281 posts in 3162 days


#10 posted 09-08-2021 01:50 PM



After I posted my comment, I looked at your first post again and realized that the light source is effectively a rear-positioned, front-facing light panel. I was erroneously thinking of a central bulb (or small line of bulbs) with the wiring going through the turret (even though you hadn’t drilled a hole for wiring). I get it now—the rotating louvers won’t allow that.

It would be cool to route the wiring through one of the legs, but it too late for that (unless you can acquire a five-foot self-tunneling SmartBit). I’ve wondered about cutting an over-wide leg in half, routing a half-depth channel inside each half (along with entry/exit channels near the ends), and gluing the halves back together. I’m sure you already thought of something like that, though.

- Ron Stewart

The lamp is going to be pretty top-heavy, and the legs already have some flex to them, especially near the ends as they taper down to 1/2” x 1/2” cross-section. I didn’t prioritize hiding the cord for this project, but if I were to do this again, I would consider partially splitting a leg and routing a channel in the two halves. I would probably need to use some other type of wood (or straighter grain wood or laminatations) that would be intrinsically stiffer than what I’ve got now.

The light source will be LED, which I’ll show in detail in a future post.

View Ross Leidy's profile

Ross Leidy

281 posts in 3162 days


#11 posted 09-08-2021 01:53 PM



Hmm. Alternately, lose the cord. There’s an LED light panel I saw that’ll run on its internal batteries for eight hours, which seems like a long enough run time, if you don’t mind plugging it in to recharge now and again.

- Dave Polaschek

That would work, but I’m not a big fan of having to replace batteries. I’ve got some battery-operated motion sensors for home automation, and I really don’t like having to swap batteries every few months. I’ll just deal with the cord one way or another. :)

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