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Tripod Floor Lamp #2: Getting started

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Blog entry by Ross Leidy posted 01-07-2020 07:38 PM 697 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Introduction Part 2 of Tripod Floor Lamp series Part 3: Preparing the triangular core for the neck »

The two auction sites referenced in the last entry did not agree on the overall dimensions so I’m eye-balling it. I had some anigre planks lying around that I decided to use for this project. I cut three overly-long strips, drum sanded smooth and ended up with a cross section of 1” x 0.44”. I think the original may have been slightly larger in both directions.

I aimed for the legs to describe a circumference of about 14”. To start figuring out the proportions, I setup 3 blocks on a piece of plywood for each of the legs to rest against. With the tops temporarily clamped together around a couple triangular pieces of solid wood, I bent out the legs at the bottom to rest against the 3 blocks. I kept shifting down the clamping location until I got a curve that looked right. I wasn’t able to step back and take a photo at this point because the legs would immediately jump up off of the blocks.

Once I had the curve I liked, I transferred the leg angle to the T-bevel. This turned out to be almost right at 15-deg off vertical, so I used 15 for all my calculations. The spokes will be at right angles to the legs, and will enter the center hub at 15 degrees off perpendicular.

For the height, I cut all of the legs to 57”.



3 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

13695 posts in 4430 days


#1 posted 01-12-2020 01:44 PM

I guess the grain have to quite the same on all three legs for the curves, so come out the same, if you don’t steam bend, but I can see that it can have it’s own charm.
Always a pleasure to see how you work.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View Ross Leidy's profile

Ross Leidy

311 posts in 3282 days


#2 posted 01-13-2020 06:59 PM

Hi Mads,
Full disclosure:
Actually, when I cut 3 strips for legs off of a perfectly straight anigre plank I’ve had for years, I released some internal stresses in the wood, and two of them were curved. I intended to use the natural curve in my favor, and when dry assembling the 3 legs with the additional induced curve, all 3 legs looked pretty close in curvature. Then I accidentally milled the leg mortise on the wrong side of one of the legs. I decided to still use it to see how it worked out even with the natural curve going in the wrong direction. It wasn’t perfect, but this was a prototype, and the results weren’t too noticeable, so I went with it. I did try a couple times to use a heat gun to soften the lignin and get the natural curve to relax, but no luck with the anigre. I expect that over time, the curves will tend to relax naturally.


I guess the grain have to quite the same on all three legs for the curves, so come out the same, if you don t steam bend, but I can see that it can have it s own charm.
Always a pleasure to see how you work.
Best thoughts,
Mads

- mafe


View mafe's profile

mafe

13695 posts in 4430 days


#3 posted 01-13-2020 11:35 PM

Thanks, yes I could imagine that even on a sinble plank it could be quite different.
I think you are right they will relax, but they will not even out, I thinkā€¦
Interesting.
Smiles.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

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