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Jensen-style Z-Chair #8: Side structure - Getting started

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Blog entry by Ross Leidy posted 05-24-2019 04:30 PM 593 reads 0 times favorited 1 comment Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Rails Part 8 of Jensen-style Z-Chair series Part 9: Dry fit pieces to date »

Once I tweak the design for future chairs, I’ll cut templates on the CNC for the the legs and back stile and use a pattern bit on the the router table to cut them out. For this initial chair, I cut out the pieces directly on the CNC. The one benefit of this is that I can have the CNC cut the mortises as well. But mortising slots could be worked into the templates as well. Since there’s a lot more waste and setup time on the CNC, I wouldn’t want to do this every time.

When cutting out the front legs, I did get some tear-out on one of them at the slight flare at the joint end. It’s a fragile area so next time I’ll shift the joint a little down the leg to eliminate that weak little flare. When cutting the remaining pieces, I changed to a climb cut just in case and had no other machining issues.

The start of the long rear leg/arm support pieces:

Small tabs of wood around the perimeter of each piece keep things from shifting as the final pass cuts through the majority of the outline. Once machining is complete, the tabs are easily cut with a utility knife to free the pieces.

Cutting the mortise in the front leg:

And the mortise on the long side piece that becomes the rear leg:

Test fitting.

You can see the tear-out on the front leg. A lot of it won’t matter because of the round-over. The hole that remains I’ll fill with saw dust and CA glue. Fortunately, it’s in a place that’s not going to be easily seen.

Dry fit the legs and back. If there’s one weak spot on the chair, it’s the mortise for the bottom rear rail. There’s the mortise that’s visible here and the mortise for the back stile. I shifted the joint upwards so the mortises don’t meet, but there a chance that rear leg could snap-off at that point. Whether it does or it doesn’t I’ll learn something. At the very least, I’ll decrease the mortise depth next time. I’t 0.8” deep in the 1” material.



1 comment so far

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1290 posts in 2106 days


#1 posted 05-27-2019 08:26 PM

Wow you are speeding along here. In my experience climb-cutting solves a lot of problems, also regarding accuracy

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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