LumberJocks

Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table

  • Advertise with us
Blog series by Ron Stewart updated 12-28-2016 11:17 PM 4 parts 3388 reads 2 comments total

Part 1: Introduction

12-28-2016 04:22 PM by Ron Stewart | 2 comments »

This series of blog posts outlines some of the construction details of my Hexagonal Cocktail Table project. As I mentioned in the project description, this table is a reproduction of a commercially available table. The original has a metal frame and legs. My table is all wood and MDF, and attaching the slender legs to the relatively thin table top proved to be quite a challenge. I’ll cover that more in a later post. Earlier this year, I retired from my position as a software engin...

Read this entry »


Part 2: The Top Assembly

12-28-2016 06:49 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

The top assembly is a three-layer sandwich approximately 1 1/8” thick. The bottom layer is 1/2” thick MDF hexagon. I had never cut a hexagon before, so I searched the web and found the excellent article Cutting Hexagons on a Table Saw by Don Snyder (a fellow LumberJock who goes by StLouisWoodworker) to use as a starting point. The large size of my hexagon (23 3/4” across the flats) made it difficult to follow the article to the letter, but I did the best I could. The ...

Read this entry »


Part 3: Legs

12-28-2016 10:31 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

The table’s legs are tall and thin, with a diamond shaped cross section. The outward-facing edges are beveled to 120 degrees to match the angles of the top hexagon’s vertex angles. After puzzling over how to cut those angles, I found a simple solution: make each leg from two triangular prisms, each with a right-triangular cross section. Then I could cut each leg half with a single 30 degree rip on the table saw. I was able to cut all of the leg parts from a 3.5” wide x 0....

Read this entry »


Part 4: Final Steps: Top Trim, Shelf, and Finish

12-28-2016 11:17 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

Top Trim The top assembly “sandwich” is trimmed by 1/8” thick poplar slats that rest on the outer edges of the leg tenons. This trim and the legs form what is a metal frame on the original table. I cut the trim from the same board I used for the legs. I attached it much like a trim carpenter installs base or crown moulding. I temporarily placed the top backer/triangles subassembly on the base, used a miter saw to cut the first piece (nibbling away until it was exactly ...

Read this entry »



DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com