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Shaper Origin Notes #4: Onboard Design Example

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Blog entry by Rich posted 11-16-2020 09:12 PM 335 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: The Shaper Workstation arrived Part 4 of Shaper Origin Notes series no next part

The Shaper Origin has a useful onscreen design mode to create basic shapes. It also has capability to support extensions, such as onscreen design of box joints and text. I’m sure more extensions will be coming along in the future.

This a simple example of drawing a bow tie shape that will allow cutting of both the insert, and cutting an opening for it on the surface of whatever you wish to insert it into.

A few things you’ll notice. When cutting the opening for the insert, the inside corners will be of the same radius as the bit. You’ll either need to clean those up, or round off the corners of the bow tie insert. With a more robust solution using vector design software, you could add a radius to those corners in the design so that the bow tie insert itself would have perfect corners and fit right in to the opening.

Startup screen – This is the screen the Origin boots up in.

Pen mode – Here, I’ve entered the Create screen and selected the Pen Tool to draw the bow tie shape with. The grid spacing has been set to 1/4”, and the pen tool will snap to that grid to set the points.

As you can see, there are other options for circles (which also does ovals), rectangles, and extensions for text and box joints.

Add point – The first point has been added, and I’m moving the tool up for the next point in the bow tie shape.

Drawing bow tie – Continuing to add points to create the shape.

Completing bow tie – Adding the final point and completing the shape.

Shape added – Here you can see the shape added and shown in its location in the workspace. Note the Copy option. With it, you can make a copy of that shape and paste it in other locations in the workspace. You don’t have to draw the shape for each one.

Line mode – When Cut is selected, it initially shows the line mode. In this mode, the tool will follow the line with the center of the bit centered on the line. That’s not what we want.

Cut type selection – By selecting the On Line option at the left of the screen, you’re presented with options for other cut types.

Outside cut – This is the cut mode you would use to cut out the bow tie insert from thin stock.

Inside cut – This mode will be the first choice to make the opening for the insert to go into. You can see how the bit radius shows in the corners of the cut display. It is an accurate indication of the cut, and switching to a smaller radius bit will make those corners sharper.

Pocket cut – Finally, the pocket cut mode allows you to clear out the rest of the opening for the insert. In use, the screen will show the cut area you’ve completed to give you a clear visual indication of what areas still need to be completed.

Here are a couple of shots to show how the cut progress is displayed onscreen.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner



6 comments so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

12296 posts in 1900 days


#1 posted 11-16-2020 10:21 PM

i gotta stop watching this thread,my will power to keep from buying expensive tools is not good-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1287 posts in 570 days


#2 posted 11-17-2020 03:34 AM

If I didn’t have a bunch of house projects to do like upgrade the electrical and put all new windows in I would own one of these. The simple things like using well known vector stroke controls and translating them to how it cuts is freaking awesome.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6155 posts in 1505 days


#3 posted 11-17-2020 03:51 AM


If I didn t have a bunch of house projects to do like upgrade the electrical and put all new windows in I would own one of these. The simple things like using well known vector stroke controls and translating them to how it cuts is freaking awesome.

- sansoo22

Yeah, dude, you’d hit the ground running. I’ve been a Photoshop guy for years, but vector concepts took some time to digest.

The concept of a closed shape was new to me. If you draw a rectangle with four lines, it looks like a rectangle on the screen. But when it gets to the Shaper, it’s four lines. You can’t cut inside or outside of that.

I figured it out pretty quickly, but it wasn’t intuitive right out of the box.

I’m glad you’re following along. Feel free to ask questions and offer input on what you know.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6624 posts in 3325 days


#4 posted 11-17-2020 05:00 AM

I am here, following along. Thinking of how I am going to finance this….. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1287 posts in 570 days


#5 posted 11-17-2020 05:02 AM

The closed shape is probably the hardest one to overcome. It’s all about points and joining them to get your shape. Another concept that gets overlooked for beginners is the hugely advantageous “snap to grid”, “flip”, and “join” features.

We can start with a basic shape. Its not technically a shape if you look at the stroke on it. We are missing one line but we want to duplicate this half and join the two.

In Illustrator we can do “Ctrl+C” to copy and then “Ctrl+F” to paste in place. So we make a copy and paste it on top the original. Then we use the “flip” feature to reverse this on the vertical axis.

Using snap to grid we can simply select our other triangle half and move it over until it lines up. But you can see from the zoom on the bottom point we still don’t have a true shape or that tip of the triangle wouldn’t be all wonky.

The last step is to select both our halves and use the “join” feature in the Pathfinder and presto magico we have a complete shape.

This was a really rudimentary example and most likely things you figured out already but thought it might help others. A lot of times in vectors we focus on drawing the whole thing when something simple like draw half, copy/paste. and flip gets a more accurate result. Much like making paper hearts as a child. Fold the paper in half and cut out half the heart. Open it up and magically both halves are identical.

View pottz's profile

pottz

12296 posts in 1900 days


#6 posted 11-17-2020 05:03 AM



I am here, following along. Thinking of how I am going to finance this….. LOL

- woodbutcherbynight


gunny if ya have some left over throw me a bone,id like a new toy myself-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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