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Finishing Tips #1: Blotch Control (Homemade) Water Base Pre-Stain Conditioner

03-24-2011 07:45 AM by pjones46 | 46 comments »

I have been working on a project in Cherry and before I finished the desks I decided to try out some of the General Finishes Dye stain but on the scrap test pieces the blotching was driving me nuts. I came to this site and tried all the suggestions until I came across the discussion proclaiming that Charles Neil’s pre stain conditioner was the way to go. Bought some, tried it and still had minor blotching but it works well. Watching his video he said it was a water based PVA enhanced produ...

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View TungOil's profile

Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #25: Crest Rail Final Shaping

07-11-2018 12:30 AM by TungOil | 18 comments »

In February I was in Pasadena and took the opportunity to visit the Huntington Library Museum, which houses many Greene & Greene pieces. The museum holds one of the living room chairs from the Gamble House and that gave me a good opportunity to study an original up close. The crest rail is beautifully shaped with a lot of rounding and shaping evident. Here is a close up of the crest rail on the original. It will not be possible to create the dramatically swept back profile seen ab...

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View PPK's profile

Morris Chair #4: Upholstery - Seat

04-27-2017 04:18 PM by PPK | 6 comments »

First off, all credit is due fellow Lumber Jock pintodeluxe, who’s tutorial I copied many ideas from. Thanks Pinto! I built a frame from Hickory. I chose hickory, because it is really tough stuff. The frame gets a lot of tension from the webbing pulling on it, getting sat on, etc. It turned out well, and there was zero discernable deflection after I stretched the webbing over it. I used half lap joints, and added corner blocks to make it even stronger. Next, I start...

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View Brad's profile

Filling the guts of your Dutch tool chest #7: Spacer and Drawers

07-26-2014 09:26 PM by Brad | 4 comments »

The last few items are optional and aren’t nearly as difficult to position and dimension. Top-section Fixture: pencil holder/spacerThe plane divider lattice for the jointer includes a large gap in front of it. So to fill this space, and to keep the plane from sliding back and forth like a dinner bowl in the galley of a ship in high seas, I made a spacer. But rather than simply cutting a piece of ½” thick stock for it, and wasting the space, I decided to make a holder for pens, tweezers bru...

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View BritBoxmaker's profile

The EZ mitre technique

07-26-2010 10:55 PM by BritBoxmaker | 80 comments »

Hello all. Well I seem to have whet the appetite a bit so here goes for a ‘novel’ technique for making mitred boxes. Its a bit like making a box out of paper, like they showed you at school, using a ‘net’. Only in 3D, with wood and a tablesaw (not sissors). Well first comes the board Its made from alternating strips of Maple and Rosewood of varying thickness. I won’t bore you with the details on how to make it suffice to say that all the corners must b...

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View GaryK's profile

How to flock a box without flocking.

06-06-2008 04:03 AM by GaryK | 18 comments »

Got an empty box that needs some kind of lining. How about fabric? I have never used flocking to line the inside of a box before so I can tell you if it’s any easier the my method. I do know that my method gives you an unlimited choice of colors and patterns of fabric. Also you get as many chances to do it right as you want. If you don’t like it just rip it out and start over. You all might remember this box from the build something without glue or fastener compitition?We...

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View HillbillyShooter's profile

Thoughts on Using Aniline Dye to “Pop” Curly Maple Veneer

03-08-2014 01:04 AM by HillbillyShooter | 10 comments »

“Popping” curly maple is something I’ve wanted to try for some time, so I decided to test it on drawer fronts for a slant cabinet I built last year. My buddies at O-P Hardwood were out of curly maple so I ended up using curly maple veneer. The aniline dye I chose was W.D. Lockwood Early American Maple Yellow from Tools for Working Wood. There are great instructions for the preparation and use of this dye on the web site. The main two things I’d emphasize are: (1) use hot, distilled wat...

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View pintodeluxe's profile

Stickley #369 Morris Chair #1: Leg Laminations and Angled Tenons

02-24-2014 09:27 PM by pintodeluxe | 6 comments »

Here is the project at hand, a slant arm Morris Chair. I am working off plans from the Popular Woodworking April 2011 issue, which I recommend you buy. The Author is Robert Lang. He posted a free diagram to Sketchup, but with this detailed of a project, you will want to order the back issue. My techniques differ from Robert’s methods significantly, so I will try to elaborate along the way. -----I like to start by laminating the legs for quartersawn figure on all four sides. ...

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View BigRedKnothead's profile

Shop Made Screwdrivers Without a Lathe

01-28-2014 08:17 PM by BigRedKnothead | 33 comments »

A couple of LJs have done this already, but they all used a lathe. The only part of a shop made screwdriver handle that needs to be round is the “tenon” in order to fit a proper ferrule. I had the notion that a tapered plug cutter could be used, and I was right. With that obstacle conquered, and a batch of screwdriver shanks from Lee Valley Tools, I went about making my custom screwdrivers. There are pictures of each step, so that should help. I made several extra handles and t...

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View Porosky's profile

Drunken Cutting Boards #2: Smooth Flowing Drunken Checker board

09-21-2009 03:49 AM by Porosky | 15 comments »

So having read part #1 I’ll complete the second variation of the Drunken checker board pattern. The process is basically the same except for one critical part and is as follows. Start again by taping two blanks together. This time In stead of making opposing S cuts I’ll follow the S pattern with each cut. (I get a little sloppy, but it works out OK). Follow the Part #1 procedure. CRITICAL PART! This step creates the difference between the pattern in part one ...

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