LumberJocks

Wood Types and Properties

  • Advertise with us
Blog series by Paul Sellers updated 05-17-2011 11:10 PM 4 parts 12041 reads 19 comments total

Part 1: Know your wood #1-Cherry

05-13-2011 10:43 PM by Paul Sellers | 5 comments »

Most people only talk about grain at the most superficial level of how it looks. We woodworkers enter the fibres. We tease the cells apart with the chisel’s edge and search for weaknesses and strengths in the species. We want to know these intimate details so we can exemplify the strengths and protect the weak from harm. I thought that it might help to give my personal insights into the different woods that I have worked with for almost five decades. Most of them are common enough, ...

Read this entry »


Part 2: Know your wood #2-Beech

05-14-2011 05:38 PM by Paul Sellers | 3 comments »

Beech trees grow abundantly throughout the temperate zones of Europe, Asia and North America. The wood is of very even denseness throughout the grain because of its relatively small pores evenly distributed through both the early and late growth of each growth cycle (annual ring). My first mallet was made from beech and most mallets for three hundred years would have come from the beech tree. Though that is the case, and beech is a hard wood, I find beech just a little too soft for making...

Read this entry »


Part 3: Know your wood #3-Oak

05-16-2011 12:19 AM by Paul Sellers | 10 comments »

Oak leaves have a unique and distinctive leaf shape Oak trees grow on each of the five continents and cultures at every level have relied on the wood and acorn, the tannic acid and the bark throughout the millennia. Great ships with oak bows and rudders crisscrossed the globe.  Massive barns and manorial homes came from the stems and crooks of full-grown oaks in every county. It would be impossible to catalogue the provision we have from the ancestry of the common oak.  Oak works...

Read this entry »


Part 4: Know your wood #4-Oak (red)

05-17-2011 11:10 PM by Paul Sellers | 1 comment »

More on oak I first worked with red oak in the Texas Hill Country back in 1987. At least that was the first time I knew of red oak as distinct from English oak. Whereas I love English and European oaks American red oak is not my favourite wood to work with and it’s not the prettiest, but it’s used ¬†extensively for kitchen and bathroom cabinets throughout the USA and many European countries too. Red oak is known for its hard and heavy heartwood that has substantial strength ...

Read this entry »



DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com