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Workshop by Mike_190930 posted 10-29-2019 09:37 PM 1039 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

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Mike_190930

20 posts in 289 days


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It is an ongoing contest to see who gets permanent ownership of the shop; me or the growing pile of lumber and cuttoffs. The latest round was last Spring. I did a major cleanup intended to evict some wood and create more working space. The wood won.

I have a 400 sq. ft. 2-car garrage (what a quaint description, eh?) that hasn’t held a car in 10 years. Under its roof resides what I humbly consider to be a modest but well equiped shop capable of handling just about any job from toothpics to 8 foot tall bookcases, dressers, tables, and the odd display shelf. It’s taken roughly 5 years to get it to where I only feel compelled to make an improvement once a month or so, instead of the once per day pace of the early years. So now, the obligatory list:

1984 vintage Sears Craftsman 10” table saw with Shop Fox fence and a Wixey fence gauge. (Yes, the Wixey really, really, can allow 0.005” accuracy). An Incra mitre gauge rounds out the add-ons. I also use a Wixey angle gauge to set the blade angle. (Yes, it really really works too, giving me 0.1 degree accuracy). I removed the contractor’s base, and mounted the saw on a wooden cabinet to use the space underneath for storage and sawdust collection. I could mount an outfeed table as well, but always seem to do ok without it.

Hanging off one side of the table saw is a router table supporting a Triton 3 hp plunge router. It shares the fence with the table saw. A shop built add-on to the fence collects the dust.

For shaping raw stock, I use a Powermatic 8” P60A jointer fitted with a Shelix cutter head. This joy takes in curly maple and turns out silky smooth surfaces without the ‘fuzzies’ in high angle grain areas.

The DeWalt DW735 planer fitted with a Shelix head puts a similar surface on the other board face. My only regret is that this 13” planer is only 13” wide, so I end up doing more panel gluing than I would like.

For curves, and generally there are a lot of them in my projects, I use a Jet 14” multispeed bandsaw. It’s 1.5 hp motor lets me re-saw pieces up to 6” tall. While I like it for what it is, some day I will replace it with a larger machine.

The drill press is a garden variety Porter Cable floor standing model, with a shop built table and drawer set below. It’s a drill press, what more can be said? OK, OK, yes, I’ll add a Wixey gauge someday.

Recently acquired, a used Jet JBM-5 mortiser with the Woodsmith x-y shop built table added. The table made operating the machine about 5 times faster for setting each plunge, and a bit more accurate too. Hmm, maybe a couple of Wixey gauges would be useful here too.

There is a Grizzley mini lathe sitting in the corner. While I seldom do any kind of serious turning, I do turn the occasional knob or spindle. Nice to have the capability when I need it. A Porter Cable grinder is nearby for tool sharpening.

On a small portable base sits a Woodriver oscillating spindle sander, and next to it a Porter Cable 6” belt and disc sander combo. They are small, but so far, effective. I haven’t had a job too big for either, and used together I can sand some pretty nice curved furniture parts.

All the above machinery sits on two way lockable wheels, so I can configure the work area for the task at hand during large projects, and just leave things where they are for smaller jobs.

All this stuff is hooked up with a ceiling suspended network of dust collection ducts that feed to a 2.5 hp dust collection system. The cyclone element is a shop built Thein type separator of my design, followed by a 5 micron pleated filter. (Has anyone found a really good way to get rid of all that sawdust?) The dust collector is triggered by a remote current sensor that I placed at the breaker side of the circuit that feeds all the big dust makers in the shop. Yes, I have about 8 motors on one circuit, and yes, they would trip the breaker if I ran even two at a time. But this is a one person shop after all, so I only need one motor at a time, ya? The dust collector runs on its own dedicated circuit.

From the ceiling also hang a couple of 20” cheap window fans with HEPA furnace filters duct taped on the intake side. These do a great job of catching dust that doesn’t get sucked up by the collector, so the shop air stays mountain springtime fresh. OK, not really that good, but a lot better than before.

Also hanging from the ceiling, a Harbor Freight 400 lb electric hoist. This is neceessary to help these old bones do maintenance on some of the machinery (for example, changing a table saw arbor, or setting a machine up on wheels) or maneuvering large heavy projects. Just wish it would stop dripping green gear lube on hot days.

There is a pair of shop built 2’ x 4’ maple topped wheeled assembly benches that can be lashed together to make a 4’ x 4’ or a 2’ x 8’ work surface, and a main 8’ long work bench on the wall. At the end of the work bench, sits a DeWalt vintage 1977 radial arm saw and farther down a more modern DeWalt 12” mitre (chop) saw. These two machines share a level work surface extending down the work bench, so I can cross cut or rip 12’ lumber if needed.

There is a lot of lumber storage in the loft, on wood racks built into the walls, in my wife’s former garden shed, the neighbor’s abandoned panel van, under beds, etc. Well, maybe not that bad, but I’ve never met a board I didn’t like. In fact, if I see a cute little board with some great figure hanging out in some seedy poorly lit lumber bin, well, it just always seems to come home with me. What can I say, I’m weak.

There is a wall of hand tools: saws, chisels, files, mallets and hammers, planes, measureing tools, etc. I won’t list the power hand tools except to say, thank heaven for lithium-ion batteries. The work bench drawers are stuffed with hand tools, circular saws, routers (can’t have too many), and the walls festooned with all manner of wood clamps (can’t have too many). There is a small pancake air compressor coupled to a shop-wide piping system with couplers conveniently located at key places. Mostly it is used for the rare pneumatic staple or nail, more often for blowing sawdust off a machine.

Most of the shop is lit with flourescent tubes, but I’ve begun upgrading to LED trough lamps. Gotta tell ya, the LEDs really brighten up my fading vision and make detailed work much more pleasant.

Oh, and coming soon, the Woodsmith CNC router. Hope to add this by Thanksgiving (this Thanksgiving, 2019, but thanks for asking). If you’ve gotten this far, and still want more punishment, then check out my blog here on Lumberjocks for that build.

-- Huh? Whadaya mean it ain't "measure once cut twice"?


12 comments so far

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

9951 posts in 1765 days


#1 posted 10-29-2019 10:02 PM

well mike thats a great detailed list of what youve got but we do show and tell here,so we gotta see it buddy-lol.
i agree on the led’s i changed every bulb in my house and shop to those,much brighter and 1/3 the energy use.hey welcome to lumber jocks,and dont forget some pic’s :)

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View GR8HUNTER's profile (online now)

GR8HUNTER

7591 posts in 1493 days


#2 posted 10-29-2019 10:43 PM

pictures or it DID NOT HAPPEN :<)) Welcome 2 LJ’s

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Mike_190930's profile

Mike_190930

20 posts in 289 days


#3 posted 10-29-2019 11:04 PM



pictures or it DID NOT HAPPEN :<)) Welcome 2 LJ s

- GR8HUNTER

OK friends, I get it. Pics to come in a day or two …

-- Huh? Whadaya mean it ain't "measure once cut twice"?

View moke's profile

moke

1558 posts in 3557 days


#4 posted 10-30-2019 04:54 PM

Very nice shop Mike, the organization is awesome. I very much believe in that, if you can’t find it, it’s worthless.
You have spent a lot of time building tables, cabinets and stands and it shows, nice job, great tools, and even nicer shop, thanks for showing..

-- Mike

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118066 posts in 4358 days


#5 posted 10-30-2019 05:16 PM

I like it, a very nice shop well organized plus lots of nice shop built details,very well done.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View GR8HUNTER's profile (online now)

GR8HUNTER

7591 posts in 1493 days


#6 posted 10-30-2019 06:11 PM

thanks for the pics you do have a GREAT SHOP :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

9951 posts in 1765 days


#7 posted 10-30-2019 06:44 PM

yeah now thats what im talkin about.greats shop space,love the RAS,every well equipped shop should have one.thanks for the pic’s mike.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1637 posts in 2417 days


#8 posted 10-31-2019 04:28 PM

What a great shop. I looks like it has a great vibe too. One of those places that just feels right.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

934 posts in 2365 days


#9 posted 10-31-2019 05:00 PM

This shop is simply fantastic. A great job of designing and setting up all the parts and pieces. Definitely agree that it gives off the right vibe in the photos.

Did you leave the typical garage doors in place, or close off the former entry wall? I can’t quite tell about that feature of the layout from the pics posted.

Thanks,

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Mike_190930's profile

Mike_190930

20 posts in 289 days


#10 posted 10-31-2019 05:45 PM


Did you leave the typical garage doors in place, or close off the former entry wall? I can t quite tell about that feature of the layout from the pics posted.

Thanks,

- jimintx

Hi Jim,

I left the tilt-up door in place (it’s the dark plywood behind the drill press). The machine power is cabled at the top edge so when the door opens, all the cables hang down; when closed they drape to the back of the machines. I have the jointer, planer, and table saw positioned so that extra long stock can feed from the driveway when the door is open.

Best,

Mike

-- Huh? Whadaya mean it ain't "measure once cut twice"?

View mike02719's profile

mike02719

245 posts in 4567 days


#11 posted 10-31-2019 08:08 PM

Great shop! How ever did you find the time to do all this? You tool bases and work benches are terrific. Can’t wait to see pics of your work.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

View mikeacg's profile

mikeacg

1543 posts in 1838 days


#12 posted 11-01-2019 10:31 AM

Welcome to the party Mike! You sure did a lot with your limited space and I admire your organizational skills (my shop… not so much!).
Looking forward to seeing your projects and I’ll be watching your CNC Blog (I’ve never tried to build one but I have 4 machines at this time so if you ever need help, just ask).

Mike

-- Mike, A Yooper with a drawl, http://www.artcentergraphics.com

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