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Yew Jack Plane

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Blog entry by MikeB_UK posted 01-02-2022 05:18 PM 534 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Yew Jack Plane, Razee style

Well, sort of in between a jack and a smoother TBH.
Square up the blank, going with Yew, which although, technically, a softwood is about as hard as hard maple.

Mark out where the bed and escapement are going to be – Aiming for about a 50 degree angle, but I’ll probably end up a degree or 2 off.

And just have at it with a chisel to remove the waste.

At this point I realised it would be a lot easier to get the angle right if I made some guide blocks.

Arrows marked on them, so I don’t use the wrong one.
And that works a lot better, should have started off using these.
That’s the main hole nearly chopped out, and the iron I ordered hasn’t rurned up yet, so on to the handles.

I’m going to need to cut up and laminate some of this for the tote as I don’t have a block tall enough.

Mark up the shape for the handle.

And cut to shape, use a center point bit for the inside curves.

Shape a tenon on the bottom, this will save having to cut the mortise in the body to the exact depth.

A coping saw for the rest.

And then just clean up with rasps to get to the outline I’m after.

Round everything off, not aiming for symmetry, aiming for something comfortable.
Then smooth off to 120 grit, no point going any higher as I’ll probably refine the shape a little after everything is put together.

The plane iron has turned up, love the fact that you can still order unused irons that have sat in a warehouse for more than 70 years.

And then I got sidetracked with a beer delivery :)

So, back to the plane – mark up the width and cut out the abutment, trying a keyhole saw, but the blade is a little too wide and flexible to work really well.

And chisel out a spot for the chipbreaker screw.

Going to have to widen out the abutment, want a bit more room than I have for the wedge.

Cut the guide line with a hacksaw blade this time (worked a lot better then the keyhole saw) and chisel out the waste.

That’s it for the abutments, so time to mark up where the handle is going to go.

Cut down the back to the required height so the handle is below the iron.

And chop out the mortise to fit the handle.

Onto the wedge, chisel out a slot for the screw.

Plane it down to approximately the right angle.

And shape it a bit to help with ejecting the chips.

That’s about all I need for it to work, so put it together and test it, works well enough to keep going and make it look better.

Bevel and smooth the edges.

And shape the wedge.

I’ve got a bit of pink ivory left over from when I made a pin vice that will be plenty tough enough for a strike button, so chisel out a spot for it and trim to fit.

Glue everything together.
Then just sand it smooth and add a couple of coats of danish oil.
And done, I’ll tweak the escapement a bit as I use it.

Yew was probably not a good idea, it seems a bit too prone to chipping, so this plane will probably get beat to hell fairly quickly, maybe the danish oil will toughen it up enough.
Might have to invest in some plane floats, should make cutting the abutments and tuning up the bed a bit easier.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.



12 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

10248 posts in 2034 days


#1 posted 01-02-2022 06:14 PM

Plane floats are a real nice thing, and they’re easy to resharpen with saw files, too. I’m even pondering making a few extra floats for dovetail smoothing. I currently use a rasp when dovetailing pine, but even though pine is pretty soft, I’ve nearly worn out my smallest rasp.

Looks like a pretty usable plane, and if it gets beat up, well, you can make the next one out of something harder. “Guess this one was just a prototype!”

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1023 posts in 2486 days


#2 posted 01-02-2022 07:10 PM

Cheers dave, if it gets too beat up it becomes a scrub plane.

Everything is a prototype, still figuring out a lot of stuff :)
I tweak pine dovetails with a chisel, never thought about using a rasp.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

10248 posts in 2034 days


#3 posted 01-02-2022 08:21 PM

I find that I never get blowout with a rasp. I often do in pine with a chisel (when trying to pare across end grain).

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3499 posts in 3642 days


#4 posted 01-03-2022 09:55 AM

Beautiful craftsmanship on this, fantastic tool.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1023 posts in 2486 days


#5 posted 01-03-2022 07:54 PM

Cheers Oldtool

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4541 days


#6 posted 01-05-2022 01:57 AM

You must called it: Smooth Jack then!
I think that will be a good name for it.

Lovely work!

Such a joy to see your work flow and the tools you use.
Love that infill you use making it also!

Beautiful old irons.

You can always give it a new sole, if needed.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1023 posts in 2486 days


#7 posted 01-05-2022 12:23 PM

Cheers Mads

The infil isn’t in the same class as your A5, but works well.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4541 days


#8 posted 01-05-2022 01:49 PM

It looks wonderful, is there a makers name on it?

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1023 posts in 2486 days


#9 posted 01-05-2022 05:39 PM

The iron is Thomas Wales & Sons.
No markings on the body, so that coupled with the shape probably means it’s just a copy of a Mathieson.

It had this user made adjuster in it when I got it that didn’t adjust the iron at all, so that coupled with the general state of it was how it was cheap enough for me to get it :)
It’s a nice little user if you adjust it with a hammer though.


-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4541 days


#10 posted 01-05-2022 08:37 PM

It looks like a lovely plane, I really like it.
Lots of soul and life in that one.
Plenty of iron left also.

I agree it looks like a home made version, but a well made one.

How does it function that’s what’s important at the end, can you set it up for some fine shavings?
I love the weight of these planes, also why I recommend people buying a 4,5 Stanly in stead of 4, if they can, it is just so much better to work with.

One of my favorite planes are much like yours, a gift from my wonderful friend Jamie, a Spiers of Ayr plane I use it a lot and I have no problem with adjusting with a hammer, in fact it was just until I learned how to use a plane I had a problem with that.
I think most people are afraid of the adjusting when they are beginners, but in fact as we learn to adjust we also learn to understand.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1023 posts in 2486 days


#11 posted 01-05-2022 10:03 PM

Works great Mads, it’s pretty much my go-to smoother for anything with awkward grain.

Lovely plane that Jamie gave you.

Hammer adjustment is great when you get the hang of it, probably enough of a learning curve to put people off though – and hitting a preceision tool to adjust it is strange enough to keep people away ;)

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4541 days


#12 posted 01-05-2022 11:34 PM

Smiles hitting a preceision tool to adjust it is strange enough to keep people away ;) I can agree with that one, even after getting used to it.
Yes I am a lucky monkey, that Jamie spoiled me, hope Covid will soon be history, so I can go and visit him again.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

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