LumberJocks

Yew Rounding Plane

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by MikeB_UK posted 12-14-2021 08:57 PM 680 reads 3 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Yew Rounding Plane – 3/4”
Needs to be some hard, tight grained wood – Yew in this case, technically a softwood, but slightly harder than hard maple on the Janka scale, so should work fine..
And a cheap spokeshave blade (8 of them + a spokeshave for £13)

Square up the blank.

Drill a 3/4” hole to match the dowel size it’s going to make.

And then ream out the hole on one side to make a cone shape. Not having a tapered reamer I’ve made do with a step drill bit and cleaned up the ridges with a rasp and file.

According to the internet I need a bed of about 20 degrees, so out with the high tech tools.

And then just hog out wood until I’ve just cleared the top of the hole enough to fit the spokeshave iron.
Chiseling out the gap instead of cutting it out to leave myself a ridge on the side to line the iron up with as it will only have 1 fixing point instead of 2 so need a way to stop it spinning round (If not I’ll have to try to use something similar to a spokeshave adjuster for depth).

A screw and washer should be enough to hold it in place firmly, the edge of the bed will keep the iron parallel.

Sharpen up the iron.

Hack of a bit of wood and make a rough hexagon.

And test it out, it works, sort of. Makes a very rough dowel that looks as if it was chewed into shape, and the shavings clog up the mouth. Needs a slight redesign.

Reshaped the back to create better chip clearance and reshaped the blade and it works a lot better, I’ll shape the iron a bit more later, but I think I can call it a success.

Onto making it look pretty and adding a couple of handles
Cut to size and drill and tap some holes to take a 3/4” threaded rod.

Use some of the rest of the blank to make a couple of handles.
Make them octagonal.

And use the rounding plane to shape the ends. Handles just friction fit in.


-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.



17 comments so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17824 posts in 4071 days


#1 posted 12-14-2021 08:59 PM

Love the process pics, and the tools used. Not to mention the final product and blog. Great job!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View DevinT's profile

DevinT

3057 posts in 419 days


#2 posted 12-14-2021 09:06 PM

Holy batman!

I’ve often thought there has to be a better way to create the escapement than the way I’ve seen people do it and I have no idea why I never thought to chuck a step drill bit (which I exclusively use for drilling plexi and steel), into a hand brace and plunge into wood.

Brilliant!

Bravo! That looks fantastic and I applaud your ingenuity—I’ve never seen that done before. I’m totally using that next time I need to make a conical bore in wood.

-- Devin, SF, CA

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

10253 posts in 2035 days


#3 posted 12-14-2021 09:18 PM

I’ve tried a rounding plane before, but only got as far as the “Makes a very rough dowel that looks as if it was chewed into shape, and the shavings clog up the mouth. Needs a slight redesign.” part and never came back to make it work right. Well done, Mike!

Didn’t see what the reshaping of the blade part was. Any possibility of seeing before and after photos of the iron?

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1024 posts in 2488 days


#4 posted 12-14-2021 10:57 PM

Cheers Smitty.

Thanks Devin, only problem with the step drill is having to smooth out the ridges after, only took a couple of minutes or so with a rasp though.

Dave, the trick seemed to be to make sure there were no pointy edges and follow the the cone to exit hole shape.
Shape before was just as it came, flat.
After is, so far, a camber on the entrance side and an angled exit with a camber so the wood can’t catch on anything.
I’ve got a stack of the irons so side by side before & after

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

10253 posts in 2035 days


#5 posted 12-15-2021 01:16 AM

Ahh, got it. I can see where the sharp corners could cause a problem. Might need to revisit mine when I stumble across it next.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4542 days


#6 posted 12-15-2021 01:26 AM

Super nice rounding plane and wonderful easy to follow blog, thank you.
Beautiful plane you used to make the hexagon shape, enjoy to watch your tools.
Now I feel inspired to make more of them… Smiles. (I have made a couple).
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1024 posts in 2488 days


#7 posted 12-15-2021 09:43 AM

Thanks Mads, you’ve made more than a couple of tools ;)

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4542 days


#8 posted 12-15-2021 01:34 PM

Smiles, yes, but only a couple of round overs.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

21686 posts in 2591 days


#9 posted 12-15-2021 02:57 PM

Very nice work Mike. I don’t need a rounding plane but I sure enjoy seeing how you made yours :-)

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1024 posts in 2488 days


#10 posted 12-15-2021 03:54 PM

Cheers Kenny, well it was cheaper than building a lathe :-)

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View DevinT's profile

DevinT

3057 posts in 419 days


#11 posted 12-15-2021 06:08 PM

Reminds me of this item on the bay

-- Devin, SF, CA

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1024 posts in 2488 days


#12 posted 12-15-2021 09:33 PM



Reminds me of this item on the bay

- DevinT


Yep, same thing – I wanted some of those irons with the double cut out but couldn’t find any – would have simplified the build some.

You can get rounding planes new as well, Ray Iles makes them over here & there are some metal equivalents around.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View DevinT's profile

DevinT

3057 posts in 419 days


#13 posted 12-15-2021 09:56 PM


Reminds me of this item on the bay

- DevinT

Yep, same thing – I wanted some of those irons with the double cut out but couldn t find any – would have simplified the build some.

You can get rounding planes new as well, Ray Iles makes them over here & there are some metal equivalents around.

- MikeB_UK

You could try a blade for the Stanley 67 universal spokeshave.

Here is one with slots

Some of the blades for the Stanley No 67 had holes instead of slots, but the one above has open-ended slots.

-- Devin, SF, CA

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4542 days


#14 posted 12-15-2021 10:19 PM

Devin,

Here some info.

I made a blog on the subject:
https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/49857

Also a really simple quick version, where you just use a handplane:
https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131956

Hope it can help,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1024 posts in 2488 days


#15 posted 12-15-2021 10:26 PM



You could try a blade for the Stanley 67 universal spokeshave.

Here is one with slots

Some of the blades for the Stanley No 67 had holes instead of slots, but the one above has open-ended slots.

- DevinT


Expensive – I could buy a Ray Iles one for that :)

Think I’ll stick with the normal spokeshave iron for now, might try and work out how to add the depth adjustment screws if I have any issues.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com