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Sanding block V2 Blog

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Blog entry by MikeB_UK posted 07-07-2021 10:42 AM 448 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, I needed another sanding block and decided to simplify the last design and make this one using a wooden screw.

Dug around for some scraps and came up some spalted beech, walnut and ash, I also used a small chunk of beech that isn’t shown here because I forgot i’d need a nut when hunting through scraps.

Roughly cut to length and square everything up.

Glue up what will become the top and bottom.

Rip the ash in 2 and make a screw while waiting for the glue to dry.

Fit the sides to the bottom section.

Make a pilot hole in the top, planning on having a couple of different sized holes, so need to make sure they are both centred.

Drill a hole about ½ inch deep (doesn’t have to be too accurate) and mark the same size circle on a scrap of beech. Used a 1 ¼ inch centre point bit, but again, the size isn’t that important.

Then drill ½ in hole for the screw to go through in the top.

Using a half inch screw so drill a 3/8ths hole in the nut and in the base.

And tap them.

Cut the bolt into a 2inch diameter circle, well, more or less, its just a bit smaller then the width of the top.

Cut a stop along the edge of the bolt for a reference – the thinner side will needs to be slightly longer than the depth of the 1 ¼ inch hole that was cut into the top.

And then chisel the bulk of the waste.

And clean up with a rasp, a lathe would make this so much quicker and easier.

Plane the sides of the top overhang to be about the same width as the sides of the bottom, this gives an indent between the two for your fingers to reference in.

Glue the screw in the bottom.

And flatten the bottom.

Put some sandpaper in and cut the screw and sides to final length.

Glue some cork to the bottom.

Oil up and it’s done.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.



7 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

7954 posts in 1740 days


#1 posted 07-07-2021 11:54 AM

Good detailed build, Mike! And a pretty sanding block!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Notw's profile

Notw

1048 posts in 2912 days


#2 posted 07-07-2021 12:23 PM

I like to put cork on the bottom of mine, gives it a little give in case the paper starts to get clogged

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

580 posts in 2193 days


#3 posted 07-07-2021 12:59 PM

Cheers Dave – the build is detailed so I can use it as a reference when I make the next one :)

Notw, yeah the cork helps, a bit – to unclog the paper I use a small shoe brush

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

18417 posts in 2297 days


#4 posted 07-07-2021 01:43 PM

Excellent work Mike. I need to make something similar for large flat areas.

It’s FAR less sexy but, for smaller and contoured things, I ordered these last year to fill a minimum order for free shipping from Lee Valley and they have turned out to be an absolute must-have now. They’re fantastic for shaping handles and sanding the film off of old plane totes :-)

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

580 posts in 2193 days


#5 posted 07-07-2021 04:31 PM

Cheers Kenny
Yeah, they look useful, and I have a bunch of small scraps lying around, hmmm.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8215 posts in 1732 days


#6 posted 07-07-2021 05:27 PM

Mike that is a tank of a sander, built to last. :-)

Ken I have an older Fein detail tool from way before anyone else made them. It’s a kit model with pretty much all they had back then, and I have several similar shapes to yours. If you like them by hand, you should see how they work with a little electric jigglin going on.

Mine are black solid rubber and have been there and done that, still perfect, not sure what the newer stuff is made from? Kinda looks like cork, which IMO would be a bad thing.

Plus they have a few type of finger/corner sanders.

Plus I like the softer sponges, them and a scalpel make any shape you want them to be.

Plus the ever comfortable, and easily formed Micro Mesh pads, strips, and whatnot. They seem to come out with a new shape every week.

Don’t forget your Rasps, files, and floats. As they are they do a lot of work, but sometimes wrapped in sandpaper they do more. Same for stupid stuff like popsickle sticks, and other small wood scraps you can bandsaw, or shape them with hand tools to make your own sanding do dads.

Can’t remember all the times I’ve thought now how am I gonna sand you. Always something can be used or made to get it done.

-- Think safe, be safe

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

18417 posts in 2297 days


#7 posted 07-07-2021 05:56 PM



...

Mine are black solid rubber and have been there and done that, still perfect, not sure what the newer stuff is made from? Kinda looks like cork, which IMO would be a bad thing.
...

- therealSteveN

The ones I got at LV are hard rubber too SteveN. The large pads are a foam rubber to use as backers for large surfaces. They work well but aren’t anything special. And I’m totally with you on the micro-mesh. Can’t beat that stuff on the lathe!

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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