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Workshop operational tips. #18: Scrollsaw Ease for Arthritic Knuckles...

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Blog entry by LittleBlackDuck posted 02-15-2020 10:31 AM 683 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 17: Cleaning a Cleaner. Part 18 of Workshop operational tips. series no next part

Boys and Girls,

Another plagiarised idea expanded, though I cannot find the offering, I believe Steve Good had a hand in it somewhere.

I was sick and tired of having arthur gnaw at my knuckles every time I tried to swing my Excalibur (scroll saw) in a deftly duel with a lance (piece of wood).

I initially purchased a set of these round knobs for my Excalibur scroll saw,

to facilitate my grip, only to find them not that much better than the original ones for the final tightening of the knobs.

I resorted to my favourite sandbox and designed these knob fasteners in SketchUp and 3D printed them,

They proved to be an improvement, but I kept popping blades so I can only assume my pansy grip was not manly enough to wield the mighty Excalibur.

Back to the drawing board, I finalised on this design to accommodate the round knobs,

and when the scrolling task was done, I had to reach for the tool and some spinach to undo my previous over exuberance of the twists.

Never prepared to let moss grow under my shoes (only fungus between the toes), I thought that if this gizmo worked so well with my round knobs, they should work equally well with the original…
DOH! What a moron, the round knob tool did not fit the elongated original one so I had to redesign it to fit,

voila… worked like a charm… and just to prove I’m ambidextrous (well at least two handed) I put each of the fasteners at opposite ends of the tool

so I would now have to decide which end to use… life was not meant to be easy.

The following is a link to the scaled PDF for the Excalibur that can be printed and scrolled (or band sawed followed by heaps of sanding… you choose) for the fasteners.

The holes in the fastener parts are for dowel alignment to prevent slippage during glue up as I laser cut mine (x2) from 6mm MDF and laminate. Carry the dowels into the ends of the grip for strength.

The grip can be either a large dowel or a lathe reject-spindle. A few (actually more than a few) longitudinal bandsaw marks will ensure a herculean grip while tightening… and hope for a repeat feat of strength when loosening.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD



6 comments so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6827 posts in 2885 days


#1 posted 02-15-2020 12:45 PM

I know its always 5 O’Clock somewhere and it looks like new blade time as well

the mighty Excalibur yet another great tool brand sadly bitten the dust

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY0WxgSXdEE

-- Regards Rob

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4525 posts in 2669 days


#2 posted 02-15-2020 10:28 PM

You have to be careful as you can damage blade clamps by over tightening. Large handles make it easy to over tighten.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1972 posts in 3694 days


#3 posted 02-16-2020 05:06 PM

I do agree that a large handle like the one youʻve made can put excessive torque on the blade clamp. Even with the small one that Iʻve made I have to be careful to not over torque the blade clamp.

You could make a small 2-sided one like this one with the 2 shapes on either side. Itʻs the extended wings on the tool that helps with getting a grip and tightening the blade clamp.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View LittleBlackDuck's profile (online now)

LittleBlackDuck

3898 posts in 1501 days


#4 posted 02-16-2020 10:56 PM


You have to be careful as you can damage blade clamps by over tightening.
- Redoak49

I do agree that a large handle like the one youʻve made can put excessive torque on the blade clamp.
- tyvekboy

Gent, two statements I can’t dispute… well I can, but then one of us 3 would be lying…

I have found that my “little” gismo, is always on hand (at the JS) and a tad easier to control than the pliers I used to use. With the circular resign, it’s easy to snug up and then do a few ° turn… with trial and error (until you stop popping blades…ensure you pull up prior to the 359° rotation mark…) take a mental note of the +° turn and use that as the benchmark…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View mafe's profile

mafe

12527 posts in 3770 days


#5 posted 02-25-2020 08:56 AM

Thats a really fine idea.
My fingers are slowly going in that direction, it runs in the family.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile (online now)

LittleBlackDuck

3898 posts in 1501 days


#6 posted 02-25-2020 02:11 PM



Thats a really fine idea…..
- mafe

Thanks mafe... but please take heed of others’ advice above in not overdoing the tightening… I probably should have mentioned it as you can get incredible pressure with the gizmo.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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