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Blog entry by LeeRoyMan posted 02-02-2020 08:34 PM 598 reads 0 times favorited 29 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m building a coffee table for a client:

I have the two ovals made and will veneer the sides after I get the cuts made for the Brass Plate Legs.

The area I’m seeking opinions on are the cuts for the brass legs. They need to be 3/8” x 4 wide and cut all the way through the 3” thick sides.

My first attempt was to use my radial arm saw.

This cut all the way through the sides but left me with the blade radius and the end that I would have to clean up.
My problem here is that I have to make 2 cuts to get the 3/8” wide (16” blade with a 3/16” wide kerf)
Since there are no square edges and I have 8 slots to cut, and everything has to be true for the brass legs to line up. I’m thinking keeping everything straight and consistent will be a problem for me.
(I still had to use a hand saw to cut out the rest of the build up edge but the cut did make it all the way down the side.)

So I came up with a second method, using a jig and a router with a 3/8” bit.

With this method I was able to keep everything true,
except I still need to match the cuts going down the sides. The edge I’m cutting through (The Buildup) is 2” wide.

So what I am seeking are any ideas on a method to cut the remainder of the cuts going down the sides without messing up the top cut and staying true down the sides.

Any ideas?

TIA



29 comments so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

5367 posts in 1270 days


#1 posted 02-02-2020 08:50 PM

You can’t use a longer router bit? Maybe go at it from both sides if need be.

If you saw it, it seems to me that the important thing is to keep the teeth of the saw below the surface so you don’t risk marring it. Maybe an oscillating tool with a saw attachment. Since you’re veneering the sides after the fact, it won’t matter if you’re a hair off on the vertical edge.

Like one of these:

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

815 posts in 407 days


#2 posted 02-02-2020 09:05 PM

I thought about lowering my bit and making a few passes, that would have got me closer,
(but I didn’t, lazy I guess)
I don’t have a longer bit, but now that I have moved my jigs it looks like plan B is in order. Or buy a 3/8 with the bearing. Need to be able to cut 2”

The oscillating tool is not a bad idea. Like you say, if I’m off I could repair or patch whatever I needed to before veneering the side. For that matter it might be just as easy to cut a block out and glue pieces back in leaving the space?

I might just go at it with my Japanese saw?

View sras's profile

sras

5341 posts in 3810 days


#3 posted 02-02-2020 09:37 PM

The thing I would do is practice a technique or two on a different piece until I felt comfortable.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 335 days


#4 posted 02-03-2020 05:04 AM

Which Japanese saw do you have? The standard Ryoba typically has teeth on both sides that might mar the veneer edge. A dove tail (Dozuki) would be my go to for this.

If it were me, with my limited knowledge, I’d be using the router set as deep as I can cut. Then my japanese dovetail from the top using the side of the groove as a guide. Then along the face using my already established cut and finally same process from the bottom. But I’d find a way to mess that up some how and cut it crooked. Just my 2 cents if it helps light any bulbs.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

815 posts in 407 days


#5 posted 02-03-2020 02:29 PM



Which Japanese saw do you have? The standard Ryoba typically has teeth on both sides that might mar the veneer edge. A dove tail (Dozuki) would be my go to for this.

- sansoo22

Thanks for the reply,
I have a cheapie 2 sided saw. It cuts pretty good though.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

815 posts in 407 days


#6 posted 02-03-2020 02:31 PM

I think I have figured another way that will work best for me.
I’ll post the results when I get a chance to do it.
I have to work out in the field today so it will be later, maybe tomorrow.
Stay tuned (for anybody interested, which seems to be not many…lol)

View pottz's profile

pottz

8482 posts in 1665 days


#7 posted 02-03-2020 05:59 PM

hey bud i didn’t have an idea for ya but im interested in what you come up with.gonna be a cool table.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5367 posts in 1270 days


#8 posted 02-03-2020 06:27 PM


Stay tuned (for anybody interested, which seems to be not many…lol)

- LeeRoyMan

The extreme level of excitement I’m feeling counts for at least 50 more interested parties.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2639 posts in 1284 days


#9 posted 02-03-2020 08:16 PM

Don’t know if this is made in a 3/8” width but this is a 1/2” width that is 2.5” long. If there is no 3/8” width can you make the inserts 1/2” thick?

Or use a 3/8” spiral bit and (if the jig is accurate) flip the board over and cut from both sides? You could then use a 1/4” chisel to square the pockets.

Or…make a custom jig/sled to stand the tops vertically, clamp the tops together and pass over a table saw blade then you’d have flat bottoms. Something like this dovetail/spline jig only square vs 45 degrees. Maybe with a 3/8” dado blade?

Where there’s a will there’s a way.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

815 posts in 407 days


#10 posted 02-04-2020 12:20 AM

Thanks for checking in Pottz!

Andy, thanks for chiming in and giving it a lot of thought. The long router bit is exactly what I was thinking, although I hadn’t gotten to the method of use yet. I hadn’t thought of jigs on the table saw, but using the table saw is what I finally decided.

So, before the excitement gives Rich a heart attack, here is what I did.

The solution was so easy when it hit me.

On the table saw I drew the width of the kerf lines all the way down the off feed table
and also in front of the saw blade. This will keep my tops all true to 90 degrees with each other so I won’t have to worry about the slots being crooked.

Then all I had to do was put the cut to lines on the tops to the kerf lines drawn on the table saw. Raise the blade, rinse and repeat for the other side and the slot matched up perfectly.

I don’t know why I used tape for the front kerf lines, I should have just put in my zero clearance throat plate.
I will change it to do the rest of my cuts..

Thanks for reading.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2639 posts in 1284 days


#11 posted 02-04-2020 12:30 AM

Beautimus!

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Rich's profile

Rich

5367 posts in 1270 days


#12 posted 02-04-2020 04:56 PM

I’d have never thought about raising the blade. Seriously brilliant. I guess that’s why you’re LeeRoy the Man and I’m not.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 335 days


#13 posted 02-04-2020 05:07 PM

Brilliant idea. Some times it just takes a moment away to come up with an awesome idea.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3449 posts in 1903 days


#14 posted 02-04-2020 06:28 PM

Good solution!

I would have ganged the pieces together then clamped them to a TS sled referenced against the fence for sure. Of course if I could cut the slots before making the parts oval, that would be even easier.

The Brass/walnut combo should look sweet!

View pottz's profile

pottz

8482 posts in 1665 days


#15 posted 02-04-2020 11:40 PM

i knew youd figure it out thats why i didn’t want to stress my self too much figuring it out-LOL.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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