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Spinnekop (windmill) #8: Kokerbalken

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Blog entry by JobK posted 10-25-2020 11:16 AM 423 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Fitting the parts together Part 8 of Spinnekop (windmill) series Part 9: Korbelen »

To support the tube (koker) and to give strength to the lower part of the windmill there are “kokerbalken” (girders?). They form a bent together with 2 posts and 2 knee braces.


Taking measurements


Making the mortises


Fitting mortis and tenon. They are aligned on the center of the beams


2 done, 2 to go


Chiseling away


All finished with the tube temporary placed on top in stead of placed in the housing



6 comments so far

View Julian's profile

Julian

1605 posts in 3604 days


#1 posted 10-25-2020 05:27 PM

I am very interested in seeing how this turns out. Nicely done.

-- Julian

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3559 posts in 4351 days


#2 posted 10-25-2020 08:05 PM

This is very, very cool. I’ve been following your posts and have decided that you must be a masochist.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1349 posts in 2627 days


#3 posted 10-26-2020 05:14 PM

Just read through this blog series and enjoyed it a lot. Have been to the Nederlands several times and been to similar windmills there.
Difficult and probably rewarding project. Will follow along and look forward to seeing the result.

What I always wonder is how the managed to find the right balance between wind, the swept area of the wings, the gearing, the lenght + the pitch of the screw and so on. Just trial and error or was there some sort of formula?
And what sort of bearing did they use? Here in Denmark a lot of old windmills (used for grinding flour) had bearings made from large blocks of soapstone.

Oh – and thanks for the dutch lesson as well!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View JobK's profile

JobK

22 posts in 1780 days


#4 posted 10-27-2020 08:04 AM



Just read through this blog series and enjoyed it a lot. Have been to the Nederlands several times and been to similar windmills there.
Difficult and probably rewarding project. Will follow along and look forward to seeing the result.

What I always wonder is how the managed to find the right balance between wind, the swept area of the wings, the gearing, the lenght + the pitch of the screw and so on. Just trial and error or was there some sort of formula?
And what sort of bearing did they use? Here in Denmark a lot of old windmills (used for grinding flour) had bearings made from large blocks of soapstone.

Oh – and thanks for the dutch lesson as well!

- kaerlighedsbamsen

It is a difficult project, but that is the fun.

How the size is determent is first off all dependent on how big the area to be pumped is, and how deep. The angle of the screw is more or less the same, the gearing ratio for a screw is always about 1:2. the diameter and length of the screw are the main parameters. Based on those sizes you can make a estimated guess on the dimension of the mill.

Bearing surfaces are usually in bluestone but can also be done in lignum vitae. That is how i will be making the bearings

Thanks for your comment

Job

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1349 posts in 2627 days


#5 posted 10-28-2020 04:39 PM

It is a difficult project, but that is the fun.

How the size is determent is first off all dependent on how big the area to be pumped is, and how deep. The angle of the screw is more or less the same, the gearing ratio for a screw is always about 1:2. the diameter and length of the screw are the main parameters. Based on those sizes you can make a estimated guess on the dimension of the mill.

Bearing surfaces are usually in bluestone but can also be done in lignum vitae. That is how i will be making the bearings

Thanks for your comment

Job

- JobK

Thank you for replying! These construction rules makes the whole calculation a lot less of a guess and more a qualifyed estimate. Smart gyus back then.. The windmills here for flour have a whole range of gear ratios and much more complex construction for clutches, different sizes of grindstones etz.

“Bluestone” appears to be a whole range of minerals when doing a search, does it have a dutch or perhaps german name that is more prezise?

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View JobK's profile

JobK

22 posts in 1780 days


#6 posted 10-28-2020 05:17 PM



It is a difficult project, but that is the fun.

How the size is determent is first off all dependent on how big the area to be pumped is, and how deep. The angle of the screw is more or less the same, the gearing ratio for a screw is always about 1:2. the diameter and length of the screw are the main parameters. Based on those sizes you can make a estimated guess on the dimension of the mill.

Bearing surfaces are usually in bluestone but can also be done in lignum vitae. That is how i will be making the bearings

Thanks for your comment

Job

- JobK

Thank you for replying! These construction rules makes the whole calculation a lot less of a guess and more a qualifyed estimate. Smart gyus back then.. The windmills here for flour have a whole range of gear ratios and much more complex construction for clutches, different sizes of grindstones etz.

“Bluestone” appears to be a whole range of minerals when doing a search, does it have a dutch or perhaps german name that is more prezise?

- kaerlighedsbamsen

In Dutch it’s called hardsteen.
The stone as part off the mill is called “halssteen”
Here some pictures and Dutch info

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